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Coconut milk solidified why?

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  • Coconut milk solidified why?

    I bought coconut milk about a
    Month ago and kept it in my cupboard.

    I went to use it the other day and opened the can and it wasn't liquid anymore.

    Am I supposed to not keep it in the panty?

    Did I do something wrong?

  • #2
    did you try shaking it? how cold is your house? i keep mine in the pantry and never had an issue.
    As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

    – Ernest Hemingway

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    • #3
      Was the entire contents of the can solidified, or just a thick top layer?

      If you just had a thick top layer, that is supposed to be that way. That top layer is the coconut cream - the fatty portion, just like cow's milk cream separates from the milk upon standing as long as the cow's milk hasn't been homogenized.

      You can whip this top layer of coconut milkfat just like you would make fresh whipped cream - chill and whip until fluffy. It is totally yummy.

      If the entire can was solidified, I think you got a spoiled product. Try another can.

      Coconut milk in cans is stable at cupboard temperatures. Sometimes folks do put theirs in the fridge so as to have a more solid layer of coconut milkfat that is easier to separate from the liquid portion.

      If you do not want separated coconut milk liquid and milkfat, leave your cans in the cupboard (warmer there) and just shake each can before opening.
      I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

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      • #4
        Hmm I don't know of the whole can was I saw the top and threw it out. I'll buy more and see. My house isn't cold at all. It's 74 during the day when we aren't home and 70 at night

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        • #5
          That just means you have nice fatty coconut milk! Yum!

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          • #6
            Yeah, anything below 75 will likely keep it more solid than liquid, especially if it falls to around 70 at night.

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            • #7
              that happened to me before and it was an old can, I presume.
              Check out my blog on nature and nurture!
              http://thewoodsygal.com/

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              • #8
                That means that you have the good stuff. There are two varieties of coconut milk I can buy and one stays thin and liquidy at room temperature, while the other is 2/3 solid with 1/3 of liquid 'whey' at the bottom. I only buy the 'solid' one now.
                Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

                Griff's cholesterol primer
                5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
                Winterbike: What I eat every day is what other people eat to treat themselves.
                TQP: I find for me that nutrition is much more important than what I do in the gym.
                bloodorchid is always right

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                • #9
                  Ok so when a recipe calls for coconut milk do I just use the solid part on the recipe? Do I have to melt it or anything? I went to use it in an egg bake so assumed I would need it to be liquid to mix it

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                  • #10
                    I believe on the label for Coconut Manna it says it starts to soften at 73 degrees. It's probably cooler than that in your pantry. I prefer my coconut milk to harden so I can pour out the watery stuff and use only the creamy stuff.
                    Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jmosery View Post
                      Ok so when a recipe calls for coconut milk do I just use the solid part on the recipe? Do I have to melt it or anything? I went to use it in an egg bake so assumed I would need it to be liquid to mix it
                      If I'm putting it in a satay I mix it all up together. If I'm making a creamy dessert I exclude the whey (and use it in something else).
                      Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

                      Griff's cholesterol primer
                      5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
                      Winterbike: What I eat every day is what other people eat to treat themselves.
                      TQP: I find for me that nutrition is much more important than what I do in the gym.
                      bloodorchid is always right

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jmosery View Post
                        Ok so when a recipe calls for coconut milk do I just use the solid part on the recipe? Do I have to melt it or anything? I went to use it in an egg bake so assumed I would need it to be liquid to mix it
                        Nah - no "melting" (unless you somehow found your can in the freezer...). Just cook with it a bit - you will get the hang of it quickly. I wish I could give much more specific advice, but I don't know what an "egg bake" is, although I can imagine.

                        Also - read the labels on the different coconut milk cans. Some are "lite" coconut milk (= thinner fatty layer and more liquid). If the can does not say "lite" it will be the regular, more fatty coconut milk. (USA stores)

                        sbhikes mentioned coconut "manna" - I just saw that in my health food store, but I have no experience with that, other than to say that it was in a glass jar, was solid at room temperature, and upon reading the label, has the actual coconut meat in it. Coconut milk is an extract of the coconut meat.
                        I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

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                        • #13
                          Heh... I always keep a can of coconut milk tucked into the refrigerator just so that it will be separated and firm enough to spoon the white part out easily whenever I want it.
                          “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
                          ~Friedrich Nietzsche
                          And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.

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                          • #14
                            Also just one small tip, make sure you're not picking up coconut cream which is sweetened. I wondered one time why my entire can was solid when that never happened before, turns out I had grabbed some coconut cream out of the pantry that I didn't even know we had. It was one sweet curry we had that night. Doesn't sound like that's what happened, just fair warning in the future if you end up with a completely solid can.

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                            • #15
                              In the winter my cans solidify, nothing to do with spoilage, I keep the house in the 60's. I just warm it up a bit in some water on the stove and shake before opening. Anything below 75f and at least some fat will separate out. The old gas stove w/ pilot was a good place to store it and the coconut butter to keep it soft. All electric now
                              Wheat is the new tobacco. Spread the word.

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