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  • #16
    Originally posted by Artichoke View Post
    You made me curious so I called the manufacturer but the Quality Control person is on vacation this week so I will call next week as I was told she can tell me exactly where the dripping comes from in Uk and how it's made.
    Any response? I see many versions of this is supermarket but I am not interested if it is processed, thanks

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    • #17
      Originally posted by JonnyH View Post
      Hi
      So how does the beef dripping in the link below look as a good fat source to cook with or just eat?

      living in the ice age: Britannia Beef Dripping

      It’s very cheap in our supermarket, my only concern is whether the fat is from grain fed cattle, if it is then is it still ok?
      I thought it’s the fat from non-organic meat that is bad for us.

      Any thoughts on this?

      Thanks
      The Britannia looks a bit white. AFAIK, beef dripping from real grass-fed animals is yellowish in colour, because of the carotenoids in it. Is grain-fed fat a problem and why? Depends who you ask, I guess. One take on it:

      Splendor From the Grass - Weston A Price Foundation

      Less intensively farmed is always better. AFAIK, Britain is better than the U.S. in that respect, and you can always buy organic, which should be cleaner but will cost more.


      Anyway, possible alternatives -- you are paying more for all these, though:

      Beef Dripping - 400g | Laverstoke Park Farm | Laverstoke Park Farm

      Devon Rose Beef | Offal & Fats | Devon Tender Beef Dripping

      Rother Valley Organics : Free Range Organic Produce Direct from the Farm


      I guess hardcore primals would render fat themselves at home.

      EDIT:

      Oh, I'd missed that: Devon Rose sells beef suet. Suet is the fat from round the kidneys and loins, and traditionally the most prized of all.

      http://www.devonrose.com/shop/beef/o...this-link.html
      Last edited by Lewis; 07-15-2012, 02:55 AM.

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      • #18
        I have just located this place online. Looks like I will be making my first purchase :-)

        York Foods | Since 1935

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        • #19
          Originally posted by TARNIP View Post
          I have just located this place online. Looks like I will be making my first purchase :-)

          York Foods | Since 1935
          Now that is cool. :-)


          This looks good, too:

          Pork Lard is made from selected fat from within a prime Australian swine
          York Foods | Since 1935

          Just the thing to fry eggs in.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Misabi View Post
            Just an FYI folks, rendered beef fat is called tallow, pig fat is lard, dripping would be what you would have if you had a hunk of meat roasting on a rack in the oven and caught the dripping meat juices and fat in a tray below.

            I couldn't imagine buying 'drippings' from a store. Where the heck would it come from? Restaurant waste, like biodiesel grease?? Industrial food production assembly lines??

            After poking around a bit online, it seems that packaged dripping is more like tallow. Rendered, refined, etc. Not like homemade drippings from cooking meat. Maybe people just don't like the idea of buying tallow, so it's sold as homey old-fashioned drippings.
            Last edited by JBailey; 07-15-2012, 05:58 AM.
            Seven Trees Farm - diversified subsistence farming on 1.25 acres.

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            • #21
              Check out the "Dog Crunchies" on the same site:
              York Foods | Since 1935
              I'm pretty sure thats the by product once the lard has been rendered from the fat tissue,
              I've always wanted to know what the nutrient content is as I keep a small container in the fridge and nibble on them occassionally, they're a little bit lardy, but I like them.

              Not too bad apparantly:
              "Doggy Crunchie contains about 47% protein and about 42 % fat, 17.2% is monounsaturated fat (the same as in olive oil) and 5.4% polyunsaturated fat. The remaining 20% is saturated fat. Doggy Crunchies contain less than 1% carbohydrate."

              My yield is usually around 80% lard & 20% crunchies when I do a batch.
              "There are no short cuts to enlightenment, the journey is the destination, you have to walk this path alone"

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              • #22
                Originally posted by JBailey View Post
                I couldn't imagine buying 'drippings' from a store. Where the heck would it come from? Restaurant waste, like biodiesel grease?? Industrial food production assembly lines??

                After poking around a bit online, it seems that packaged dripping is more like tallow. Rendered, refined, etc. Not like homemade drippings from cooking meat.
                it's just a name that's as it is because of its etymology. The fat dripped when beef was cooked in front of an open fire. Hence the name "dripping" for beef fat. Almost no-one cooks meat in front of an open fire (although people -- again for historical reasons -- call meats cooked in an oven "roast" rather than "baked").

                It's just a traditional name -- much as one might refer to a woman as a "lady". Etymologically, the word "lady" is connected with bread: it means "loaf-giver". But no-one nowadays expects that a woman will give you bread just because you refer to her as "lady".

                Current U.S. usage seems to accept "tallow" as name for high-quality beef fat, but whether that's a recent language change or something that might also have been so in other English-speaking societies in the past I really don't know. Historically, tallow seems, as far as i can tell, to have been used for more nondescript fats -- the sort of thing you might use for greasing a boat, an axle, or a church bell, or send for candle-making.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Lewis View Post
                  it's just a name that's as it is because of its etymology. The fat dripped when beef was cooked in front of an open fire. Hence the name "dripping" for beef fat. Almost no-one cooks meat in front of an open fire (although people -- again for historical reasons -- call meats cooked in an oven "roast" rather than "baked").

                  It's just a traditional name -- much as one might refer to a woman as a "lady". Etymologically, the word "lady" is connected with bread: it means "loaf-giver". But no-one nowadays expects that a woman will give you bread just because you refer to her as "lady".

                  Current U.S. usage seems to accept "tallow" as name for high-quality beef fat, but whether that's a recent language change or something that might also have been so in other English-speaking societies in the past I really don't know. Historically, tallow seems, as far as i can tell, to have been used for more nondescript fats -- the sort of thing you might use for greasing a boat, an axle, or a church bell, or send for candle-making.
                  Also, nondescript fats used to be called "slush" in the 18th and 19th century UK navy - used for greasing pulleys and things. Tallow candles in mediaeval Britain were often dried rushes dipped in mutton fat - beef fat (dripping in the UK) and lard (pork fat in the UK) would have been too useful in the kitchen to make candles from.

                  Houses must have smelled pretty unusual when the candles were lit - bet they had trouble stopping dogs and rats and mice getting at them! Perhaps that's why there are so many nice antique wall hanging candle boxes about!

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                  • #24
                    Slush was the cooks privilege, and they often sold slush to augment their official pay.

                    Tallow candles were also very 'melty'. Warm weather would cause them to droop and drip while burning. Rushlights were made from all kinds of saved fat, pre and post- cooking, so that must have been kind of gross.

                    Since I raise and cook my own meat, I've done quite a bit of research on historical uses of fat. The dripping thing is weird though, since what is sold in stores prepackaged isn't really dripping at all. But I guess calling it that invokes all kinds of fond memories for people who grew up using real dripping. I think Americans got side-tracked with chemical crap like margarine & shortening and don't have much folk memory of real fat cookery.
                    Seven Trees Farm - diversified subsistence farming on 1.25 acres.

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                    • #25
                      Haven't heard back from Nortech Foods abt the Britannia dripping. However thanks to Lewis' great research, I can buy the Laverstoke Park Farm dripping from Jody Scheckter's cows and because I'm a Friend of the Soil Association, get 10% off my order to boot First I have to eat some of my freezer stash though.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Artichoke View Post
                        Haven't heard back from Nortech Foods abt the Britannia dripping. However thanks to Lewis' great research, I can buy the Laverstoke Park Farm dripping from Jody Scheckter's cows and because I'm a Friend of the Soil Association, get 10% off my order to boot First I have to eat some of my freezer stash though.

                        Any updates on the Britannia Dripping?

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