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Do I need extra fat if I am already fat?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Michaeljwjr View Post
    I am still according to my BMI (33.74) obese. I am wondering if for my diet I really need to incorporate extra fat into my diet or is my own fat enough provided I am consuming the requisite Protein and Nutrition part.

    Should I add coconut oil, animal skin, or anything else, or can I cut out all the extra animal fat and maintain the protein and nutrition?

    It really depends on your goals. You will lose weight very quickly if you just eat protein and vegetables. This diet is called a protein sparing modified fast and is basically the best way to lose weight quickly and without health risks. The problem is that the diet is super restrictive, bland, and can make you feel sluggish and just all around bad (some people feel great on it though...depends on the person). I personally wouldn't suggest it as it was far too intense for me and actually caused me to binge.

    I would suggest you figure out your maintenance calories, subtract maybe 500-1000 depending on how strict/how fast you want to lose the weight, eat enough protein and get enough veggies and fruit in to make sure you are getting your vitamins, and fill in the rest of your calories with whatever keeps you sane and least likely to fall off the wagon. That is the best way to lose weight. If you are not losing weight or not losing it quickly enough, cut calories by a couple hundred calories and adjust from there. Pretty simple...it just takes discipline to stick to it.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Gravyboat View Post
      This.

      Also, BMI is a crock of shit, so don't bother with that.
      For most people BMI is a good indicator of where they are health wise. Obviously there are super athletes that are super muscular and are "obese" according to the BMI scale and there are skinny fat people that are "normal" on the BMI but have a large body fat percentage, but these people are few and far between. For most people, the BMI is just fine.

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      • #18
        My husband qualifies as "overweight" currently, and was "obese" when we had to do BMI to come to this country.

        But, our doctor included a note with the BMI asserting that DH was in great shape, with less than 15% body fat (he didn't do a calculation, he just looked at him. He also wrote "And is built like a brick sh*thouse" on our immigration health form. LOL I loved that guy.

        Since he lost muscle coming here (recovering from injuries and focusing on body weight, mobility, etc to heal those injuries), and also fat (he's down below 10% fb currently, his BMI went down to the "overweight" category. Still, he's not at all 'overweight' in any way that would be unhealthy (it being all sexy muscle).

        At a certain point, I think that focusing on your body fat percentage is more effective than weight or BMI. but you may not be at that point yet, and that's cool.

        I think it's fine if you want to decrease the amount of fat that you are consuming. Why wouldn't it be?

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        • #19
          I just occasionally work out my percentages, and as long as Im getting around 60% of my daily calories from fat, I don't fiddle with it. I love the fat, and yes it does make you full, but isnt that the point? Im a woman, so I need more fat than you possibly... Nothing will make me give up my high fat, adequate protein limited carbs way of eating!

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          • #20
            My own experience was, fat loss didn't quite kick off until I upped my fat intake significantly.

            I just can't eat much when fat is a big percentage of my diet, and it keeps me so full that I can only eat once a day.

            Now if I need to really lean out for summer or something, it's pretty easy. I just eat less protein and more fat, which ends up to be less calories overall and feeling full all the time. Fat is pretty yummy too.

            Doesn't get easier than that.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by jimhensen View Post
              For most people BMI is a good indicator of where they are health wise. Obviously there are super athletes that are super muscular and are "obese" according to the BMI scale and there are skinny fat people that are "normal" on the BMI but have a large body fat percentage, but these people are few and far between. For most people, the BMI is just fine.
              I disagree. I am hardly a super-athlete, but despite having a healthy build, I am considered well into obese on BMI(~225@5'10"). My BF is fairly low(visible abs), but I'm not really hugely muscular(I don't lift for hypertrohpy)- I just have a big frame. My father is much the same way, though he carries a bit more fat. Both of us are among the healthiest people you will ever meet. On the other hand, I see skinny-fats everywhere- many Americans have virtually no muscle, so if they have a small frame, they can be carrying a whole bunch of fat without being out of the normal catagory for BMI.

              Also, remember that the lowest risk catagory of BMI is "overweight"(probably where I am, adjusting for frame):Excess deaths associated with underweight, overweight, ... [JAMA. 2005] - PubMed - NCBI
              Lifting Journal

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Apex Predator View Post
                I disagree. I am hardly a super-athlete, but despite having a healthy build, I am considered well into obese on BMI(~225@5'10"). My BF is fairly low(visible abs), but I'm not really hugely muscular(I don't lift for hypertrohpy)- I just have a big frame. My father is much the same way, though he carries a bit more fat. Both of us are among the healthiest people you will ever meet. On the other hand, I see skinny-fats everywhere- many Americans have virtually no muscle, so if they have a small frame, they can be carrying a whole bunch of fat without being out of the normal catagory for BMI.

                Also, remember that the lowest risk catagory of BMI is "overweight"(probably where I am, adjusting for frame):Excess deaths associated with underweight, overweight, ... [JAMA. 2005] - PubMed - NCBI
                I totally agree with you and think what jimhensen posted about BMI is one of the most stupid things I've been able to read on this forum. Most teenagers and young adults you meet in the street will have a fairly normal BMI. However most of them will eat in a very unhealthy way, will have a body fat percentage that will be on the higher side...Etc
                Young self-caring Paleo-eater from France.
                (So please forgive the strange way I tend to express myself in your beautiful language )

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by chickenbackside View Post
                  My own experience was, fat loss didn't quite kick off until I upped my fat intake significantly.

                  I just can't eat much when fat is a big percentage of my diet, and it keeps me so full that I can only eat once a day.

                  Now if I need to really lean out for summer or something, it's pretty easy. I just eat less protein and more fat, which ends up to be less calories overall and feeling full all the time. Fat is pretty yummy too.

                  Doesn't get easier than that.
                  This is interesting because my experience is the exact opposite. For me fat loss didn't happen until I dialed back the fat intake and upped the lean protein.

                  For me, overeating on fat is the easiest thing in the world. I could eats sticks of butter and still want more with butter on top. But if I have a nice lean cut of beef like flank steak that I have to chew, I feel like I have really eaten something and am satisfied with far fewer calories.

                  Not saying you are wrong. Just that we are different.

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                  • #24
                    And another experience, here! I went very high-fat to get my system convinced it was safe to use it for fuel. It worked! I lost about ten pounds, nice and slowly. Months later, I reduced the fat and increased the protein, and have continued to reshape my body. Now that I've had it, I know what it feels like to be satisfied - and for me, that's protein. And a lot of it. Very often 1000 calories of protein a day. Fat is next, by caloric density, and then greens and sweet potatoes, avocados, eggs and the rest.

                    But, yes, I lost weight and gained muscle when I dialed back the fat and increased protein.
                    Crohn's, doing SCD

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                    • #25
                      According to me, no you don't need to add extra fat. You only need to follow a proper diet plan and also do a regular exercise in case you are obese. Try to cut down on your carbs as well as fats intake. Drink lots of water as suggested by many dieticians.

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