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  • #31
    I've been eating sardines almost every day during the week. This morning I had squid in their own ink. I put the sardines (or squid) on top of my salad.
    Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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    • #32
      Canned sardines in water are a key component of my diet, their nutrient profile is outstanding. Have them for snacks an lunches regularly.
      Recent Blog: http://www.peakperformanceradio.net/...y-john-saville

      https://www.facebook.com/PaleoJourne...?ref=bookmarks

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      • #33
        FierceHunter was right about one thing
        F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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        • #34
          "
          Organ Meats

          Organ meats, such as liver, heart and kidney, are very high in purines. Beef liver, for example, contains more than 286 mg of purine in 100 g and beef kidney contains more than 230 mg in an equal amount. In comparison, a low purine food such as cooked rice provides only 6 mg of purines per 100 g.

          Oily Fish

          Certain types of fish and seafood are also very rich in purines. Oily fish, such as sardines, anchovies, salmon and mackerel are good examples. A 100 g serving of sardines contains almost 350 mg of purines and an equal amount of salmon provides 250 mg. Some shellfish such as clams are moderately rich in purines; 100 g of clams contains about 135 mg of purines.

          Read more: What Foods Will Cause A Uric Acid Buildup? | LIVESTRONG.COM
          "

          I eat beef liver, beef heart, sardines, and salmon almost everyday.
          Should I be worried ?!
          Young self-caring Paleo-eater from France.
          (So please forgive the strange way I tend to express myself in your beautiful language )

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          • #35
            You should only liver about once per week. It's so high in vitamin A it can become toxic.

            In his book, The Fat Switch, dr believes its purine rich foods like krill that triggers whales to gain weight for their seasonal migrations. Paleolithicly fructose from fruit and honey has been the primary switch that increase uric acid leading to seasonal fat storage. IMO, and having read a lot about this diet, The Fat Switch is a must read. I'm expecting Mark to do a blog post on it sometime
            Would I be putting a grain-feed cow on a fad diet if I took it out of the feedlot and put it on pasture eating the grass nature intended?

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Healthy realist View Post
              Got some good info here! So to sum it up sardines are a good choice, just be sure can is bpa free and not in soy bean oil. And if I can afford it on occasion get the fresh ones Thanks! Having a quick go to food makes life so much easier!
              A lot of important information has been left out of this discussion. First, "sardine" is a vague term that encompasses a variety of different fish. There are two main styles of tinned sardines. The tiny "Brisling" style, which come from the North Atlantic and are usually layered in the can, and the larger Mediterranean style, which usually come three to a can. I prefer the Mediterranean style, as do most true sardine aficionados. The most prized sardines are sourced from Portugal, followed closely behind by Spain/South of France with Morocco being held in considerably lower regard. If I were to eat Brisling style sardines, I'd probably want them sourced from Scandinavia.

              Tinned sardines traditionally come with bones and skin on, but you can find boneless, skinless varieties as well. These should be avoided as the skin and bones provide a massive nutritional boost that you don't want to miss out on. Tinned sardines are cooked in a variety of liquids. Avoid the acidic ones like tomato and lemon because of the BPA issues. Extra Virgin Olive oil is your best bet, followed by Natural Spring Water. My primary source for Sardines is Vital Choice, an online purveyor of quality seafood. They sell Portuguese Sardines in Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil that come in special BPA free ceramic "tins". Slightly more expensive than what you buy at the store, but worth it in my view and bear in mind these ceramic "tins" are actually a little bigger than real tins so you are getting more product too. When I run out of them and have to buy in stores, I look for Portuguese sourced options first. My local go to brand at the Supermarket is Palacio de Oriente, which is from Spain. Note that high end Health chains like Whole Foods and Fresh Market actually have pretty awful, overpriced sardine selections. In my area, local European Specialty shops, Latin Bodegas, and regular Supermarkets all have better selections. Finally, somebody up thread noted Bella Sardines. I bought these once. They are "smoked" which not only turned me off from a taste standpoint, but when I looked at the ingredients, I noticed "natural smoke flavor" in the list. I don't even know what that is. Fresh Sardines are great, but more commonly found in Iberia and Italy than over here in America.
              Last edited by JWBooth; 10-05-2012, 10:27 PM.

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              • #37
                In his book, The Fat Switch, dr believes its purine rich foods like krill that triggers whales to gain weight for their seasonal migrations. Paleolithicly fructose from fruit and honey has been the primary switch that increase uric acid leading to seasonal fat storage. IMO, and having read a lot about this diet, The Fat Switch is a must read. I'm expecting Mark to do a blog post on it sometime
                Thankfully, this is all hogwash. I basically eat purine-dense foods as a staple. Oysters, liver, you name it - like every other day, or at least twice a week. My abs popped out last week better than ever and I've never had any issues wth uric acid build up. So either you're wrong or I'm made of unicorn pieces.
                Crohn's, doing SCD

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                • #38
                  Yup I expect that purine-rich foods are only a problem for those consuming unnatural and non-seasonal quantities of fructose. Anyone doing so is clearly not primal.
                  F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Knifegill View Post
                    Thankfully, this is all hogwash. I basically eat purine-dense foods as a staple. Oysters, liver, you name it - like every other day, or at least twice a week. My abs popped out last week better than ever and I've never had any issues wth uric acid build up. So either you're wrong or I'm made of unicorn pieces.
                    How do you know it's all hogwash? What is your expertise to make that claim? You aren't challenging me. You are challenging a lab research team out of the University of Colorado. Johnson is a kidney specialist in charge of the renal and hypertension department. RICHARD J JOHNSON, M.D. | Academics | University of Colorado Denver If you're saying he's wrong then back it up with some facts as to why.

                    Here's the Mercola interview with Johnson: Dr. Richard Johnson: How Fructose Turns On Your Fat Switch Refute the claims he makes.

                    What I'm seeing is how Johnson's research opinions flows into Lustig's research opinions on fructose The Skinny on Obesity - UCTV Prime - YouTube

                    What's in his book they have submitted to peer review medical journals: "richard j johnson" metabolic syndrome - Google Scholar
                    Would I be putting a grain-feed cow on a fad diet if I took it out of the feedlot and put it on pasture eating the grass nature intended?

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                    • #40
                      You can easily look up gout and find articles that say fructose plays a role. It's a fat man's disease and people get fat not by eating delicious liver and fish but by eating refined carbohydrates and drinking beer.

                      Also you can eat liver more than once a week. It won't hurt you. Usually you will get tired of liver when you've had enough. Ever notice how all that advice out there usually is the exact opposite of what you should do?

                      I did not know the smaller Brisling sardines were the lesser kind. They are usually more expensive. I bought some of every kind to try this week. I am bummed to see the squid in ink are also in sunflower oil. I wonder why there is so much more variety of tinned fish at the Mexican market? Are there any good Latin recipes for sardines?
                      Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                      • #41
                        My advice on eating liver about once per week comes from Matt Lalonde. Since he eats Paleo and is phd biochemist I'm going his advice. Different animals have different concentration of Vitamin A. Inuits will http://www.livestrong.com/article/26...-uric-acid/not eat any polar bear liver because one meal of will make a person sick. PBs have the highest concentration vitamin A of animal animal

                        What Johnson thinks is how elevated uric acid leads to insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome. So for purine foods it depends on how much you are eating
                        Last edited by Scott F; 10-06-2012, 04:30 PM.
                        Would I be putting a grain-feed cow on a fad diet if I took it out of the feedlot and put it on pasture eating the grass nature intended?

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                        • #42
                          how about sardines in mustard sauce?

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                          • #43
                            Polar bear liver is not cow's liver. I challenge you to eat too much cow's liver. You will get tired of it long before you overdose on Vitamin A.

                            Sardines in mustard sauce are delicious!
                            Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                            • #44
                              68 grams of beef liver is has over 400% the daily needs. As a hunter Grok was not eating much liver weekly
                              Would I be putting a grain-feed cow on a fad diet if I took it out of the feedlot and put it on pasture eating the grass nature intended?

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                              • #45
                                I've regularly consumed 10,000% of my RDA of vitamin A in one meal and it did nothing bad. I often eat a pound of liver at a time, beef or chicken. I am the evidence you are looking for. I seek out and religiously eat purine-dense food, and have been doing so for three years. Have lost 45 pounds, suffered no ailments - at all, other than a sniffle here and there, and once I ate some bad beef heart and had to barf - and feel like a million bucks. You want proof? I can double my oyster and liver intake for you. I see no reason not to.
                                Crohn's, doing SCD

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