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  • #31
    Originally posted by kml View Post
    How can one possibly structure a binge? Binge - for me this means eating without any control applied. If you are able to plan your overeating, like buying specific food for it or even plan the timing of this, you are clearly in control.
    I do not think that everybodes binges - as you said before it is a lifestyle and not a diet. Hence letting go once in a while, applying the 20% does not mean binging it just means that one is not obsessive about food all the time

    I suppose it depends on your definition of binge. I associate binge with basically eating non paleo (i.e. letting go for a meal). As I say, I usually structure this to after I workout which will generally be after a kettlebell class and a run for me. I can sometimes binge on potatoes or chips after a tough workout. I have seen no negative impact on my fat loss doing this personally.

    To get to this point where I can control my eating as eluded to here, the 24 fasting method was valuable to me in training my brain and practising self discipline. I currently do the leangains protocol at the moment which i find quite easy to follow.
    2010 - 5,11 and 101KG

    2012 - 5,11 and 77KG

    Train hard, eat well and love life

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by MarissaLinnea View Post
      Eating a Primal diet high in fat AND binging is not going to get me where I want to be physically.
      This is a very important question that you must answer: Why do you think The Primal Blueprint is a high fat diet?

      It's not. There is no macronutrient profile for a Paleo/Primal lifestyle. Your body does not care if it runs on fat or carbs. The key is getting them from real, whole food sources. A sweet potato isn't less healthy than a steak. Mark has a personal preference and pushes the agenda that fat is the preferred fuel for the body. Maybe that works for him psychologically, and it may be healthy for diabetics and the severely overweight with major glucose issues, but for the average, reasonably healthy person, it's totally inaccurate. This is a VERY interesting page you should read:


      Paleolithic Era

      -2,600,000 Lower Paleolithic (first stone tools)
      -1,900,000 Homo rudolfensis (staples: leaves, seeds, tubers opportunistic: fruits, large insects, small vertebrates)
      -1,900,000 Homo erectus (staples: fruit, meat opportunistic: small vertebrates, insects)
      -1,830,000 Homo habilis (staples: fruit, leaves, herbs opportunistic: meat from large vertebrates)
      -1,810,000 Homo georgicus (staples: tubers, roots, seeds, herbs, opportunistic: fruit, meat)
      -1,600,000 Homo ergaster (staples: meat, small vertebrates, tubers, fruits, seeds, nuts, insects)
      -700,000 Homo antecessor (staples: herbs, seeds, tubers, roots seasonal: nuts, fruits, mushrooms, meat)
      -600,000 Homo rhodensiensis (80% plant sources, 20% animal sources)
      -420,000 Homo pekinensis (staples: herbs, seeds, nuts, roots, tubers seasonal: meat, fruit, berries)
      -400,000 Homo heidelbergensis (80% plant sources, 20% animal sources)
      -250,000 Middle Paleolithic (stone scrapers, points, backed knives, etc.)
      -200,000 Homo sapiens (modern human species)
      -175,000 Homo neanderthalensis (staples: large game, bone marrow, cannibalism opportunistic: plants)
      -40,000 Upper Paleolithic (musical instruments, blade tools, spear-throwers, bows and arrows)
      -10,000 (BCE) End of Pleistocene

      Neolithic Era

      -9,500 (BCE) Earliest Agriculture
      -8,800 (BCE) Earliest archaeological evidence of harvested emmer wheat
      -7800 (BCE) Earliest archaeological evidence of harvested eikorn wheat
      -7500 (BCE) Domestication of Maize/Corn
      -7000 (BCE) Neolithic Agricultural Revolution (emmer wheat, einkorn wheat, barley, lentil, pea, chickpea, bitter vetch, flax)
      -7000 (BCE) Humans breed durum (pasta) wheat by artificial selection of emmer wheat
      -7000 (BCE) Average human height shrinks by 5 to 6″ (An Edible History of Humanity)


      http://evolvify.com/paleo-diet-timeline/

      If you actually look through human history and you believe this article is accurate, you'll see humans subsisted for a much longer time on fruits, tubers and very small game than ruminant meat and fats. We lacked the technology until fairly recently to kill large game! I'm not saying fats are unhealthy - animal fats are clearly VERY healthy sources of nutrition - but this whole carb-fear stuff has to stop. We have been eating starchy roots, tubers and fruit for a lot longer than we've been eating beef. Starches are so crucial in the human diet that we produce amylase to break down starch in our saliva - food's first contact with the body. We begin digesting starch before we begin digesting meat! THAT is how important glucose is to our bodies.

      The reason why you are binging is your body wants glucose. Your body craves it. Your brain NEEDS it. Even on a ketogenic diet, your brain is running on glucose - it's devouring your lean muscle mass to get it. We are omnivores - we should be eating animal flesh, fruits, tubers and vegetables. The reason why you are probably binging is your brain has been socialized to associate glucose = sugar, so when your brain wants glucose, you're thinking of chocolate, cake, pasta and candy. The key to real success is to reprogram your brain. When you want cake and cookies, eat sweet potatoes and fruit. A bowl of white rice will CRUSH a pizza and ice cream craving. Your body just wants the carbs. You've just been brainwashed over decades to binge on the bad stuff. Over time, I have reprogrammed my subconscious. I have never binged on cake or ice cream. I have never craved pasta or bread. I do, however, crave potatoes and apples. And I eat them, so I never eat more than 1 or 2. I listen to what I want.

      If you start incorporating starches and fruits into your diet regularly, the binges will go away. Moderate fat/moderate carb/moderate protein IMO is the ideal diet. When you eat a little bit of everything, you eliminate the binges best. Stop elimination-dieting: low fat is crap, low carb is crap. Eat what you crave. If you ignore your carb cravings and stay needlessly low carb, this will just keep happening. Just make sure you eat primal carbs.
      Last edited by ChocoTaco369; 06-14-2012, 08:10 AM.
      Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

      Comment


      • #33
        I binge from time to time, maybe once or twice per month. That's why intermittent fasting works so well for me. If I have a major binge, then it's not going to really set me back since I probably haven't eaten all day anyway. I think it's healthy to go all out sometimes, at least from a mental perspective. However, it's probably not good if you are binging a few times per week.

        We are wired to binge and take in a ton of calories for survival purposes. Because of our easy lives these days, we have to keep it under control. It's tough, but you can do it.

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by john_e_turner_ii View Post
          I binge from time to time, maybe once or twice per month. That's why intermittent fasting works so well for me. If I have a major binge, then it's not going to really set me back since I probably haven't eaten all day anyway. I think it's healthy to go all out sometimes, at least from a mental perspective. However, it's probably not good if you are binging a few times per week.

          We are wired to binge and take in a ton of calories for survival purposes. Because of our easy lives these days, we have to keep it under control. It's tough, but you can do it.
          I look at it from an evolutionary perspective. Food storage is a modern creation, so for 99% of humanity, breakfast was probably a rarity. It likely took hours to find a significant food source, meaning IF'ing through breakfast was probably the norm. Also, since man didn't know when his or her next meal would come, it was probably commonplace to eat as much as you could. Look at animals - they stalk their prey for hours, hunt, gorge, then fall asleep. That's how I base my meals on - infrequent, large feeds, and I push most of my calories near bedtime. 600 calorie lunches and 1,500-2,000 calorie dinners are my norm.

          Whether or not that's the ideal way to eat is debatable, but even if smaller, more frequent meals work better for you in terms of sustainability, I still believe it's healthy for us all to occasionally go for awhile on no food at all and feel prolonged hunger, and I believe it's healthy on occasion for us to truly stuff ourselves uncomfortably.
          Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by Leida View Post
            Stick to it, and it will go away. The more you say "no", the easier it becomes. It takes months, rather than days. One more trick that works is delaying the treat eating, by either eating something good for you but not associated with pleasure before hand (a can of tuna, a tbsp of coconut oil, whatever else that you know is good, but not exactly exciting) or setting a 'cool down' time before eating a treat (I will eat it. Later. If I still want to.)

            Yep, that is my case too. Unfortunately, only curable by removing fruit from diet and supplementation with 5 HTP.
            I will try these tips and look into 5 HTP. I have no idea what that is but I will google it. I know the more I say "no", the stronger I will get and the easier the cravings will be to deal with. I just have to get myself back into that mindset like I was before. And I really don't know what to do about fruit at this point. Since I'm having a tendancy to binge on it, my thought is that I should eliminate it for at least a few months until I get this thing under control. But I don't even know if that's the right thing to do either.

            Originally posted by emmie View Post
            The best help I've gotten is from the book Brain Over Binge. The author is a recovered bulimic, but her advice works for anyone who binges or has episodes of compulsive overeating.

            She explains the physiology that 'causes' the urge to binge as well as why it often can't be resisted and offers a technique for aborting the binge that I've found helpful.
            I will check out the book, thank you!

            Originally posted by Forgotmylastusername View Post
            I just keep my binges structured and periodic. I make them very low fat high carb so I at least get some benefits from them and refill some glycogen. For me, It's a good psychological break to have a good binge and it kills my desire to regularly binge on other foods like chocolate.
            My binges can not be structured. If I could structure my binges, they wouldn't be binges at all. The reason it's a binge (to me anyway) is because I feel as though I am eating without any sense of control. I binge on sweets and candy and a lot of times it's driven by emotional things.

            Originally posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
            This is a very important question that you must answer: Why do you think The Primal Blueprint is a high fat diet?

            If you actually look through human history and you believe this article is accurate, you'll see humans subsisted for a much longer time on fruits, tubers and very small game than ruminant meat and fats. We lacked the technology until fairly recently to kill large game! I'm not saying fats are unhealthy - animal fats are clearly VERY healthy sources of nutrition - but this whole carb-fear stuff has to stop. We have been eating starchy roots, tubers and fruit for a lot longer than we've been eating beef. Starches are so crucial in the human diet that we produce amylase to break down starch in our saliva - food's first contact with the body. We begin digesting starch before we begin digesting meat! THAT is how important glucose is to our bodies.

            The reason why you are binging is your body wants glucose. Your body craves it. Your brain NEEDS it. Even on a ketogenic diet, your brain is running on glucose - it's devouring your lean muscle mass to get it. We are omnivores - we should be eating animal flesh, fruits, tubers and vegetables. The reason why you are probably binging is your brain has been socialized to associate glucose = sugar, so when your brain wants glucose, you're thinking of chocolate, cake, pasta and candy. The key to real success is to reprogram your brain. When you want cake and cookies, eat sweet potatoes and fruit. A bowl of white rice will CRUSH a pizza and ice cream craving. Your body just wants the carbs. You've just been brainwashed over decades to binge on the bad stuff. Over time, I have reprogrammed my subconscious. I have never binged on cake or ice cream. I have never craved pasta or bread. I do, however, crave potatoes and apples. And I eat them, so I never eat more than 1 or 2. I listen to what I want.

            If you start incorporating starches and fruits into your diet regularly, the binges will go away. Moderate fat/moderate carb/moderate protein IMO is the ideal diet. When you eat a little bit of everything, you eliminate the binges best. Stop elimination-dieting: low fat is crap, low carb is crap. Eat what you crave. If you ignore your carb cravings and stay needlessly low carb, this will just keep happening. Just make sure you eat primal carbs.
            I feel as though I do incorporate starches, veggies and fruits into my diet, every single day. I have been having a whole sweet potato at lunch, letting myself have unlimited access to fruits and also having a couple servings of veggies with my dinner every night. I was at a point where I was going to limit fruits and all veggies, but I changed my mind on it and added in a little more servings of fruit.

            As far as Primal being a high fat diet, it's always been my understanding that one of the main components of going Primal was that fat needed to be a big part of the diet. And it makes sense to me, especially coming off of a very high carb SAD, because the fat keeps me feeling full instead of having that gut wrenching hunger I used to have every 2-3 hours. I have no idea if I am currently eating too little, moderate, or too much fat. But I will say that combined with the binges, it's making me gain and I don't want that.

            If I can get control of the binges, then what I am eating for my meals should be no problem. I don't eat poorly otherwise, I don't go crazy and eat a ton of unnecessary fat or anything. I would say the extent of my adding fat would be the couple tablespoons of coconut oil that I have with my coffee in the morning, but I like the taste of it and it helps to keep me full. Other than that, I would say my fat intake is probably in the moderate range, but again I'm not sure of that.

            So considering my binges can start with fruits, do you think it would be best to limit or eliminate fruits for now and just focus on eating meats/veggies and roots/tubers? I just desperately want to break this cycle and get back to where I was when i first started. I was so focused and totally in the zone and I messed it all up by having birthday cake. It's been a downward spiral since then.

            Comment


            • #36
              I would follow Leida's advice on this before ChacoTaco's. She's got experience that is more similar to yours. Fruit is not necessary for good health. You can add it in later if it doesn't work to eliminate it.
              Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

              Comment


              • #37
                Marissa-
                Your binges may start with fruit because you may be like me; anything with a sweet taste will set me off on an eating frenzy.

                As you've noted, many of the posters here don't understand a true 'binge'--which cannot be 'structured' because by definition the individual is out of control and eating totally compulsively.

                If fruit is one of your 'triggers,' I'd suggest eliminating it. I love fruit, but I know I simply can't eat it without uncontrollable urges to eat. I also have a metabolic dysfunction that makes me very sensitive to carbs, and that may be the reason I can't eat fruit. But the urge to binge is very complex and begins in our own brains, which is the major problem. That 'little voice' that's encouraging you to eat the fruit--or the candy, etc., is your own voice, and it's very seductive.

                By being aware of the problem, I've managed some degree of control--but I'm not 100% 'cured' and doubt that I'll ever be. It's a continual challenge.

                I wish you well in your efforts to deal with it.

                Comment


                • #38
                  I will try these tips and look into 5 HTP. I have no idea what that is but I will google it. I know the more I say "no", the stronger I will get and the easier the cravings will be to deal with. I just have to get myself back into that mindset like I was before. And I really don't know what to do about fruit at this point. Since I'm having a tendancy to binge on it, my thought is that I should eliminate it for at least a few months until I get this thing under control. But I don't even know if that's the right thing to do either.
                  Marissa, an easy way to identify if you have a sugar dependency is to eliminate all sugar and sweet flavors, natural or unnatural for 2 weeks. If you feel withdrawal, get depressed, shaky, and feel you NEED A FIX, you get angry with people eating sweets, you feel like hoarding the sweets, etc, it is a sign of abnormal sugar dependency. If you on the other hand do not even notice it, you are good.

                  It is also important to understand if you are simply hungry, and trying to get full and going for the 'easy grab' or you are dependent and your brain chem is impacted. Have easy non-sweet high protein foods or veggies easily available at all time. Pack larabars at the farthest darkest corner of the highest shelf. When the need strikes, will you chomp down a can of sardines with fresh greens or a red pepper with raw cheese or sliced turnip? Or would you grab that footstool, and drop a box of tissues on your head, and still get the larabar (for me it was dried cranberries)? Those were the moments when I got clued in that I have a sugar problem.

                  5 HTP is a tyrophan... whatever supplement that stabilizes serotonine, reducing mood-brain chemistry drive to self-medicate with sweets. Sweets naturally increase serotonine. There are 2 mechanisms of 'getting the blues.' One is cortisol deficiency. Primal fixes it for people - they eat fats and proteins and veggies and emerge happy and victorious. But if you are serotonine deficient dropping sugar and grains causes further deficiency, and you start irritably and hopelessly foraging till you break down and go into a spree of fruit, more fruit, a bit more fruit, a square of dark chocolate, a graham cracker...

                  Once you drop fruit, if you have a sugar problem, you will also notice that you get full on less food and stay fuller longer, and the nature of your hunger will change from dizzy-disoriented and passive to active and aggressive. You will be able to do stuff when you are hungry, not feel like you are about to pass out.

                  Well, that's what it was for me. I did no fruit for 40 days, but tried to put it back, starting with low sugar berries, but binges returned in a couple of weeks, and I started to get hungrier and hungrier again. I managed to stop before I passed the dark chocolate stage. I will try adding fruit again, and see again if I am Okay this time around. i do not limit veggies or root veggies. In the beginning i even avoided sweet potato because that bud was triggering despite great nutritional profile.
                  Last edited by Leida; 06-14-2012, 12:33 PM.
                  My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
                  When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Leida View Post
                    Marissa, an easy way to identify if you have a sugar dependency is to eliminate all sugar and sweet flavors, natural or unnatural for 2 weeks. If you feel withdrawal, get depressed, shaky, and feel you NEED A FIX, you get angry with people eating sweets, you feel like hoarding the sweets, etc, it is a sign of abnormal sugar dependency. If you on the other hand do not even notice it, you are good.

                    It is also important to understand if you are simply hungry, and trying to get full and going for the 'easy grab' or you are dependent and your brain chem is impacted. Have easy non-sweet high protein foods or veggies easily available at all time. Pack larabars at the farthest darkest corner of the highest shelf. When the need strikes, will you chomp down a can of sardines with fresh greens or a red pepper with raw cheese or sliced turnip? Or would you grab that footstool, and drop a box of tissues on your head, and still get the larabar (for me it was dried cranberries)? Those were the moments when I got clued in that I have a sugar problem.

                    5 HTP is a tyrophan... whatever supplement that stabilizes serotonine, reducing mood-brain chemistry drive to self-medicate with sweets. Sweets naturally increase serotonine. There are 2 mechanisms of 'getting the blues.' One is cortisol deficiency. Primal fixes it for people - they eat fats and proteins and veggies and emerge happy and victorious. But if you are serotonine deficient dropping sugar and grains causes further deficiency, and you start irritably and hopelessly foraging till you break down and go into a spree of fruit, more fruit, a bit more fruit, a square of dark chocolate, a graham cracker...

                    Once you drop fruit, if you have a sugar problem, you will also notice that you get full on less food and stay fuller longer, and the nature of your hunger will change from dizzy-disoriented and passive to active and aggressive. You will be able to do stuff when you are hungry, not feel like you are about to pass out.

                    Well, that's what it was for me. I did no fruit for 40 days, but tried to put it back, starting with low sugar berries, but binges returned in a couple of weeks, and I started to get hungrier and hungrier again. I managed to stop before I passed the dark chocolate stage. I will try adding fruit again, and see again if I am Okay this time around. i do not limit veggies or root veggies. In the beginning i even avoided sweet potato because that bud was triggering despite great nutritional profile.
                    I can tell you right now without a doubt, I have sugar dependency. When I first went Primal, my carb flu was HORRIBLE but if I can get through it one time, I know I can get through this.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Yes, you can. It might take a few tries, you will have to learn a lot about yourself, but you can.
                      My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
                      When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Marissa, you can do it, it will take willpower at first, just like you've done before, but then it gets so easy. When you think you're about to "cheat" remind yourself that you'll have to start over and is it really worth it?? If you keep healthy snacks ready to grab, you will fight the urge to eat and overeat the wrong foods. I know you can do it, dammit; I'm fired up for you

                        I have so much more energy on meats, nuts, veggies and some fruit. I sleep extremely good, I wake up proud that I stuck with it the day before, and I only started this in April when I bought Mark's book and found all of these healthy peeps.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Leida View Post
                          Marissa, an easy way to identify if you have a sugar dependency is to eliminate all sugar and sweet flavors, natural or unnatural for 2 weeks. If you feel withdrawal, get depressed, shaky, and feel you NEED A FIX, you get angry with people eating sweets, you feel like hoarding the sweets, etc, it is a sign of abnormal sugar dependency. If you on the other hand do not even notice it, you are good.

                          It is also important to understand if you are simply hungry, and trying to get full and going for the 'easy grab' or you are dependent and your brain chem is impacted. Have easy non-sweet high protein foods or veggies easily available at all time. Pack larabars at the farthest darkest corner of the highest shelf. When the need strikes, will you chomp down a can of sardines with fresh greens or a red pepper with raw cheese or sliced turnip? Or would you grab that footstool, and drop a box of tissues on your head, and still get the larabar (for me it was dried cranberries)? Those were the moments when I got clued in that I have a sugar problem.

                          5 HTP is a tyrophan... whatever supplement that stabilizes serotonine, reducing mood-brain chemistry drive to self-medicate with sweets. Sweets naturally increase serotonine. There are 2 mechanisms of 'getting the blues.' One is cortisol deficiency. Primal fixes it for people - they eat fats and proteins and veggies and emerge happy and victorious. But if you are serotonine deficient dropping sugar and grains causes further deficiency, and you start irritably and hopelessly foraging till you break down and go into a spree of fruit, more fruit, a bit more fruit, a square of dark chocolate, a graham cracker...

                          Once you drop fruit, if you have a sugar problem, you will also notice that you get full on less food and stay fuller longer, and the nature of your hunger will change from dizzy-disoriented and passive to active and aggressive. You will be able to do stuff when you are hungry, not feel like you are about to pass out.

                          Well, that's what it was for me. I did no fruit for 40 days, but tried to put it back, starting with low sugar berries, but binges returned in a couple of weeks, and I started to get hungrier and hungrier again. I managed to stop before I passed the dark chocolate stage. I will try adding fruit again, and see again if I am Okay this time around. i do not limit veggies or root veggies. In the beginning i even avoided sweet potato because that bud was triggering despite great nutritional profile.
                          This is A+ information. Thank you so much for sharing that. I was totally like the bolded part even before I gave up the sugar. The footstool and bonking my head thing, too. It was a triumph the day that I took all the hoarded tootsie rolls out of my desk drawer and left them in the breakroom. I didn't do that until I was sure that primal worked.

                          I read that vegans tend to go on massive sugar binges because their diet is so low in the building blocks for serotonin. That's one thing that made me understand better why eating primal works so well. By eating enough meat and animal fats I was getting the building blocks for healthy neurotransmitters. No wonder I felt so happy.

                          I keep a stack of sardines and canned salmon on my desk now. If I'm hungry enough to eat sardines, I'm hungry.
                          Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            i didn't read through this whole thread, but i used to binge and have had great results with primal eating. i always thought it was an emotional thing and even sought counselling for it. for ME, it didn't really seem to help the binge eating. what did help was to jump back on track with the diet as soon as possible following a binge. that's always the most difficult part, isn't it? as well as dealing with the guilt and self-judgement that ensues.

                            i'm not the most aware person, so it was a shock to me when i thought to consider, "hey...i haven't binged in months!" it was a huge feeling of accomplishment, but it happened when i took the focus off of my binges and stopped thinking/stressing about them. i have had control of my binges for about a year now (completely primal for two yrs.) other things that helped me:

                            -REALLY upping the fat. i mean, significantly. it helped to stabilize my moods and kept me truly satiated. there are plenty of threads on here about watching the calories, but i feel like that is a useful secondary step. if you suffer from binges, work on that first so that you aren't feeling deprived (*key)

                            -i always had a vague time-frame for when i expected to see results and decreases in the desire to binge. i expected my results to be similar to what i've read on this forum. well, i must be a slow learner because it took me a helluva lot longer to experience control over binges than most. i continued to be patient, and finally noticed some improvements. my meals slowly got larger and less frequent. i remember that after binges i would feel so remoreseful that i would be weary of eating high fats at my next meal. this was a dangerous cycle. it's the fats that kept me full. i had to forgive the binge, dismiss the guilt, move on and consume plenty of eggs, bacon and butter .

                            -caffeine can be dangerous in the beginning. i cut it out for awhile and have reintroduced it now that my food cravings are under control.

                            -IF helped considerably once my binges were down to a once-monthlyish place. again, i jumped into that too quickly in the beginning and completely set myself up for failure.

                            good luck to you. i know how frustrating the process is. be patient with and kind to yourself (and your body!) i sometimes tell my body that i love it out loud. i'm a little crazy like that, but it totally helps!
                            this wounded bear is gonna find ALL the answers...health, reveal thyself!!

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by JudyCr View Post
                              Marissa, you can do it, it will take willpower at first, just like you've done before, but then it gets so easy. When you think you're about to "cheat" remind yourself that you'll have to start over and is it really worth it?? If you keep healthy snacks ready to grab, you will fight the urge to eat and overeat the wrong foods. I know you can do it, dammit; I'm fired up for you

                              I have so much more energy on meats, nuts, veggies and some fruit. I sleep extremely good, I wake up proud that I stuck with it the day before, and I only started this in April when I bought Mark's book and found all of these healthy peeps.
                              Thanks girl, I appreciate that!

                              Originally posted by yogashmoga View Post
                              i didn't read through this whole thread, but i used to binge and have had great results with primal eating. i always thought it was an emotional thing and even sought counselling for it. for ME, it didn't really seem to help the binge eating. what did help was to jump back on track with the diet as soon as possible following a binge. that's always the most difficult part, isn't it? as well as dealing with the guilt and self-judgement that ensues.

                              i'm not the most aware person, so it was a shock to me when i thought to consider, "hey...i haven't binged in months!" it was a huge feeling of accomplishment, but it happened when i took the focus off of my binges and stopped thinking/stressing about them. i have had control of my binges for about a year now (completely primal for two yrs.) other things that helped me:

                              -REALLY upping the fat. i mean, significantly. it helped to stabilize my moods and kept me truly satiated. there are plenty of threads on here about watching the calories, but i feel like that is a useful secondary step. if you suffer from binges, work on that first so that you aren't feeling deprived (*key)

                              -i always had a vague time-frame for when i expected to see results and decreases in the desire to binge. i expected my results to be similar to what i've read on this forum. well, i must be a slow learner because it took me a helluva lot longer to experience control over binges than most. i continued to be patient, and finally noticed some improvements. my meals slowly got larger and less frequent. i remember that after binges i would feel so remoreseful that i would be weary of eating high fats at my next meal. this was a dangerous cycle. it's the fats that kept me full. i had to forgive the binge, dismiss the guilt, move on and consume plenty of eggs, bacon and butter .

                              -caffeine can be dangerous in the beginning. i cut it out for awhile and have reintroduced it now that my food cravings are under control.

                              -IF helped considerably once my binges were down to a once-monthlyish place. again, i jumped into that too quickly in the beginning and completely set myself up for failure.

                              good luck to you. i know how frustrating the process is. be patient with and kind to yourself (and your body!) i sometimes tell my body that i love it out loud. i'm a little crazy like that, but it totally helps!
                              You are absolutely right. The guilt I feel after binging is so horrible. I'm a bit of a mess emotionally today, not to mention I'm dragging ass from my "sugar hangover" and feel pretty icky physically. My brain is all fogged out, body is puffy....I'm just doing the best I can to stop thinking about the binge and forgive myself for it. It's so very hard though!

                              I was considering upping my fat, but it scares me! I've already gained a bit from the binges and I don't want it to get any worse.

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                              • #45
                                In my own experience, extreme and frequent binges are psychological. There is something else going on, a reason that a person feels the need to punish themselves and beat themselves up. And food is the weapon. Again, my experience.

                                Now, I can have every past "trigger" food in the house, and I don't binge. I can take a taste and that's it, it holds no power anymore. I'm in control. And I like being more powerful than a box of cookies
                                Ask a Forensic Artist

                                "There is no limit to what a man can do or where he can go if he doesn't mind who gets the credit." ~Ronald Reagan

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