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Being Primal with a newborn

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  • Being Primal with a newborn

    Hi all,
    Sorry if this isn't exactly all about nutrition but, let's be honest, this thread sees the most traffic and I need the advice. I send a shortened version of this to Mark for a Monday Musing topic but I kinda need some advice sooner that that.

    I am a new father. My wife and I had our first daughter yesterday. We should be heading home today and I'm not sure how to approach would used to be my normal routine. So my question is: do you all have any advice on diet, sleep, and exercise for new primal dads?

    Sleep is obviously pretty much non-existent right now - what is the best approach to maximize the little sleep I'm getting?

    Diet seems pretty clear. However, I know we'll be getting a lot of non-primal food delivered in the coming weeks. I plan to buy a little more at the store in case I need to whip something up for myself cause what was brought is unable to be primally tweaked. Any other advice?

    And then working out. I know that sleep is a huge part of the recovery process and I'm not getting much of it. Plus, being tired, I'm sure there is a higher risk of injury. I usually do CrossFit style workouts 3x a week. Better to take a week or so off or should I keep at it? Maybe just do lighter workouts?

    Thanks all!
    Strength and Honor

  • #2
    I think you should focus this time on your wife as she has a ton of recovery to do and the first baby is a HUGE learning curve! Just eat primal, sleep when you can sleep...
    Check out my blog on nature and nurture!
    http://thewoodsygal.com/

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    • #3
      Well, I'm a mom, so my perspective is a little different. I have a 2 year old and a 5 month old.

      ASfar as working out goes, the lack of sleep stresses your body. Working out stresses your body. Right now, I'd say rest trumps working out. The more you can be there for your wife the less stressed she'll be and the less stressed you'll be. My husband was barely around. It's tough. If you MUST work out, make them even moreshort and simple than normal. For example, while your wife nurses on one side, do push-ups, tabata squats, and other body weight exercises. Make it fast, like 5 minutes.

      Eating well will be your biggest help, as well as your wife's, sans sleep. I notice the most patience and overall lack of exhaustion when I keep my eating on track. I'd take an hour and make some food you know you can count on. 1 hour a week making food can get you through most of the week. Grill some burgers, make a few sweet potatoes, chop lettuce, throw a beef roast in the crockpot, etc. Forget recipes. Just make easy protein, easy veg, easy nutrient dense carbs (sweet potato).

      Do you have an exercise ball? If not, get one. I've found the ball to be effective in soothing crying babies. Hold the baby, sit on the ball and bounce to infinium. Movement helps soothe and relax babies. My first had GERD....bad. The ball was a life saver. We couldn't ever be still. I could only eat meals while bouncing on the ball. The second one doesn't have GERD, but we still use it and it works wonders for us.

      Good luck. Each stage has pros and cons.

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      • #4
        At this point you should be concentrating on what you can do for your wife and child. I'll give you the benefit of the doubt and assume you have those figured out already.

        And you'll NEVER have your "normal routine" again.

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        • #5
          Ummm---go take care of your wife. Make sure she has what she needs. For exercise, plop the baby in a sling or Moby and take it for nice long walks so your wife can sleep/shower/eat. Don't worry about sleep, you'll sleep in a few years.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Ransom View Post

            Sleep is obviously pretty much non-existent right now - what is the best approach to maximize the little sleep I'm getting?
            Not obviously. Read The Continuum Concept and other books about how primitive cultures raise their children. The baby should be with the mother most of the time with lots of skin-to-skin contact, including when the mother is sleeping, with access to her breast. Babies in this situation tend to be calm and quiet. Our modern practise of segregating a newborn to sleep is actually cruel to the child. The child is literally traumatized every night. They don't "cry themselves to sleep" all the time, either. When a lone, crying child goes silent, he is usually still awake for a while. It's a protective mechanism that's activated to help protect him from wild animals when he knows he's been abandoned by his parents.

            In short, co-sleep with your baby and you will all get your rest.
            You lousy kids! Get off my savannah!

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            • #7
              Babymoon. Eat as well as you can, but give preference to easy stuff, like a plate of browned ground beef, a roast chicken, or eggs and some steamed or fresh veggies (spend extra money on pre-chopped if you have to or chop in batches). For exercise try to spend time out of doors with your baby rather than in a gym. Rotate sleep with your lady. And, don't be afraid of bottles and formula. The whole breastfeeding thing is far too pushy and far too cruel. It's still 5 years behind me, but I am still traumatized by it. protect your wife from it!
              Last edited by Leida; 06-11-2012, 08:32 AM.
              My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
              When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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              • #8
                How you can spit out a good primal diet for parents and then in the next breath, advise them to feed their newborn a sub-standard, non-primal food is beyond logic.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Grumpycakes View Post
                  Not obviously. Read The Continuum Concept and other books about how primitive cultures raise their children. The baby should be with the mother most of the time with lots of skin-to-skin contact, including when the mother is sleeping, with access to her breast. Babies in this situation tend to be calm and quiet. Our modern practise of segregating a newborn to sleep is actually cruel to the child. The child is literally traumatized every night. They don't "cry themselves to sleep" all the time, either. When a lone, crying child goes silent, he is usually still awake for a while. It's a protective mechanism that's activated to help protect him from wild animals when he knows he's been abandoned by his parents.

                  In short, co-sleep with your baby and you will all get your rest.
                  Not necessarily. The babe is tiny and can easily be taught to sleep by itself. It isn't cruel not to sleep with the infant: babies can and do suffocate in bed with their parents. Me, I break CW and put the kid on its tummy, since all three of mine were raised at a time when we were told that babies on their back would choke. Babies on their backs don't sleep, so of course they don't get SIDS.....

                  Some children do well with cosleeping, but many do not. Babies aren't a little bundle of nothing, and each one is different. One approach is to lay the infant, even or especially tiny, down and wait a few minutes to see if they settle. Swaddling is also useful. This way, they learn to put themselves to sleep, and even if they end up in bed with you later in the night, they have a really good skill. Also, learn to wait about 5 minutes--seriously, use a timer!--before picking up the baby and fussing over it. Most breastfed babies don't need to eat more than once every two hours and for about 20 minutes at a time. After that, try a pacifier.

                  Modern parenting seems to revolve around creating a competition to be the most frazzled and self-sacrificing person possible. Any hit that you have it together causes people to state that you aren't caring for the baby.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by bionicsamm View Post
                    How you can spit out a good primal diet for parents and then in the next breath, advise them to feed their newborn a sub-standard, non-primal food is beyond logic.
                    Because the studies don't support the nonsense currently spouted about breastfeeding. I nursed three---and if I had as much trouble as some of the women I know, I would have cheerfully fed formula. Mom needs sleep and to be other things than a human cow.

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                    • #11
                      Babies can and do suffocate in cribs too.

                      Co-sleeping will 100% get your wife more sleep. You know that feeling when you have to get out of a warm bed to pee in the middle of the night? The same feeling comes up when you have to get up and go to a crib to get your baby to nurse it. At least
                      with co-sleeping, you roll over, pop a nipple in the baby's mouth, get a latch and go back to sleep

                      Both my children co-slept, at the same time, until they decided to move into their own beds (at 3 years and 15 months.) Neither have ever had a problem sleeping on their own, they both sleep well now (at 11 and 9 years of age.)

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                      • #12
                        And my thread has officially been hijacked. Wonderful. My opinions, while I'm here: Breastfeeding is great so far and my wife is enjoying it. As for co-sleep, I prefer not to smother my baby.

                        Thanks all for the advice on what I actually asked for it on. I will get the best sleep I can and will eat as well as I can keeping it simple. I may do some short workouts at home but will mostly plan to be there for my wife and child. Thanks all!
                        Strength and Honor

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                        • #13
                          Ransom, the point is that it's no longer about you. It's all about your baby. If your baby is well-rested, then you will be well-rested.

                          I prefer not to smother my baby
                          Literally or figuratively? Neither will happen.
                          You lousy kids! Get off my savannah!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by bionicsamm View Post
                            Babies can and do suffocate in cribs too.

                            Co-sleeping will 100% get your wife more sleep. You know that feeling when you have to get out of a warm bed to pee in the middle of the night? The same feeling comes up when you have to get up and go to a crib to get your baby to nurse it. At least
                            with co-sleeping, you roll over, pop a nipple in the baby's mouth, get a latch and go back to sleep

                            Both my children co-slept, at the same time, until they decided to move into their own beds (at 3 years and 15 months.) Neither have ever had a problem sleeping on their own, they both sleep well now (at 11 and 9 years of age.)
                            Holy carp, three years old and still in your bed? One of us would have died----either I would've killed the kid or myself. NOT a high-touch person. At all. And I need to sleep......

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                            • #15
                              I got lots of sleep (considering the circumstances), that's the point LOL!

                              Next you'll ask how I managed a sex-life, like the only place to get laid is in your bed

                              And Grumpycakes, I'm probably going to hell for it, but I actually agree with you on this!

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