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Huffington Post article on the High-Protein and Low Carbohydrate Diet

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  • Huffington Post article on the High-Protein and Low Carbohydrate Diet



    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kathy-freston/a-high-protein-diet-wont_b_492203.html


    They have an interview with Dean Ornish of www.pmri.org


    He cites a few articles such as "A look at the Low-Carbohydrate Diet" by Steven R. Smith, M.D. (n engl j med 361;23 2009). He references this article in explaining


    "that high-protein, low-carbohydrate diets accelerate atherosclerosis (blockage in arteries) through mechanisms other than traditional risk factors such as changes in cholesterol and triglycerides."


    I downloaded this article and it seems that they came to this conclusion by conducting studies studies on mice. I don't know how much we as people relate to mice. But that seems a bit odd.


    Smith's article did cite an article called "A Randomized Trial of a Low-Carbohydrate Diet for Obesity" by Gary D. Foster et al. (N Engl J Med 2003;348:2082-90). This study actually used a fair amount of people. Here is their summarized conclusion.


    "The low-carbohydrate diet produced a greater weight loss (absolute difference, approximately 4 percent) than did the conventional diet for the first six months, but the differences were not significant at one year. The low-carbohydrate diet was associated with a greater

    improvement in some risk factors for coronary heart disease. Adherence was poor and attrition was high in both groups. Longer and larger studies are required to determine the long-term safety and efficacy of low-carbohydrate, high-protein, high-fat diets."


    What is missing from these studies is exercise in their test subjects. If Primal Blueprinters didn't follow the general guidelines for play or exercising, how would our increased fat and protein intake affect us?


    Oh, and I have all of these articles available if anyone is interesting, just send me an message.


  • #2
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    Why are they talking about adherence if it was on rats?

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    • #3
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      Mice are pretty much herbivores, meat is not naturally a significant part of their diet so they aren't equipped to handle high-protein/high-fat at all. Rats are fairly close to humans dietary-wise. (What's a good diet for a human is generally a good diet for a rat)

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      • #4
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        "Mice are common experimental animals in biology and psychology primarily because they are mammals, and also because they share a high degree of homology with humans. They are the most commonly used mammalian model organism, more common than rats. The mouse genome has been sequenced, and virtually all mouse genes have human homologs."


        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mouse#Laboratory_mice

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        • #5
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          Also, isn't the high protein/low carb diet they cite also low fat?

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          • #6
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            Is taking a mouse genetically modified to have a heart attack, giving it food designed to give it a heart attack, concluding that the mice and therefore humans will die of a heart attack science?

            Don't be a paleotard...

            http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...oxidation.html

            http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...torage-qa.html

            http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/fat...rn-fat-qa.html

            http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...-you-need.html

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            • #7
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              if i remember correctly ornish preaches low fat and low carb... so a "kimkins" like approach i would think... rats do not relate disgestively to humans much at all.. they handle fructose a LOT better than human subjects(maybe why they say we should get 5 fruits a day?). as well, what is the PUFA intake in these mice as that alone will cause worse results and also how high was the omega 6? their sun exposure? their hormonal balance?


              there is so much to take into account when studies are done that i generally disregard all of them unless someone like Perter at Hyperlipid fully analyzes them, at which point it is usually way over my head anyways

              Get on my Level
              http://malpaz.wordpress.com/

              Comment


              • #8
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                The opening salvo concerned me, "plant-based diet is both preventive and healing, whereas a diet high in animal protein is destructive to our health. And now it's become abundantly evident that a high protein diet is not only making us sick, but it also makes us fat."


                I have issues when people make really broad sweeping, and in this case pretty forceful, statements rather than simply stating the facts / research they have to present and let the reader come to their own conclusion. When the article does actually mentions studies, it is in the form of "studies show" or "a study at this important sounding place shows" but provides no details of the studies methodology, etc. As a contrast, this article http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE6224UV20100304 in which they tell you the methodology of the experiment and tell you the findings "may suggest".


                Now Zerhyn actually went through the trouble of digging deeper, something I think the author of the article should have done and presented to the reader. What she really should have said was "studies on mice suggest that" and let the reader draw their own conclusions. But as it's been said plenty of times in this forum, there is a political agenda with many vegetarian activists that can cloud objectivity.


                I guess the lesson to take away from this is for people following a paleo path to not get bogged down in dogma the same way the the veggie folks often can, or too enamored with any particular person.

                Apathy is tyranny's greatest ally.

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                • #9
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                  MalPaz, your Hyperlipid reference reminded me that I hadn't been over there in a while. So much good stuff (the parts I can understand, or pretend to understand, at least). His post from March 10 also has a great set of illustrations that serve as a pretty handy explanation of how a high-carb diet can lead to hyperinsulinaemia and obesity:


                  http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.c...-official.html

                  Check out my blog here.

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