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Supplements. Are they really necessary?

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  • #16
    Thank You for the input, we have not tried that much,
    And she does take it all at nite, I will talk to her about
    Increasing and splitting the dose. When we ate crap she was fine
    So it is extremely frustrating to clean up you diet & then have
    Migraines!

    Thanks Again

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    • #17
      Has she maybe added in a new food that she could have an intolerance to?
      Durp.

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      • #18
        I strongly recommend prudent supplementation given the fact that certain nutrition just isn't available today like it would have been in the paleolithic era. The most obvious example being vitamin D since most people aren't shirtless and outside in the sun all day anymore. Here is what I take, daily:

        vitamin D
        magnesium/zinc/calcium hybrid
        multivitamin with no iron

        People rave about fish oil to balance omega3/6 ratios... but i would simply recommend limiting o6 intake to almost nothing and eating a fresh piece of fish once or twice a week. Polyunsaturated fat in general is highly unstable, including isolated o3, and research does show that short term o3 supplementation can help certain biomarkers, but has it's own liabilities over the long run.

        AKA, don't pound the soybean oil dressing and say lol omega 3 pill will neutralize this.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by RitaRose View Post
          I think how much supplementation you take, and whether you do at all, is going to depend on your specific issues, how much your body has healed and the quality of the food you're able to get. But I would do my best to get the majority of nutrients from good food and just fill in any gaps with a little supplementation.
          I think this says it very well. If you need magnesium for your headaches, or a multi while you are traveling for work or some D in the depths of winter in some really cold place, great. I don't think, however, that everybody is deficient in everything the way some supplement peddlers would have you believe. Read those ads with large quantities of iodized salt.

          I have taken supplements for specific issues/times in my life like a multi during chemo and extra D and calcium to rebuild bone density afterwards. Now I don't take any supps at all and feel great.

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          • #20
            Timely thread, I just logged on to search magnesium/potassiun because I remembered them mentioned for leg cramps.

            After a year & half of virtually 100% Primal and otherwise feeling completely awesome I'm starting to get some really bad leg cramps at night. It's disrupting my sleep and I have to get up & walk around before they'll go away. THIS ANNOYS ME.

            I eat only local, grassfed meat and plenty of it, offal included. Tons of veggies and BAS - did that even before Primal. Local eggs from pastured hens and about 30% local, raw goats milk. The rest of my milk, cream and & comes from the grocery, non-organic 'cause that's all I can get locally. This is ranch country, no dairy cows for now, although that could change soon (fingers & toes crossed).

            Marks' Damage Control vitamins are tempting because I trust the source but the price is a bit more than my budget will allow. Not saying they aren't worth it, just can't afford it right now. Guess I'll start with some magnesium & see if that helps & experiment from there.

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            • #21
              Pickles?

              I've been plagued with restless legs, especially my knees. Just as I start to go to sleep, my knee muscles will jump and wake me. Magnesium maleate helped. I just bought the one that looked right at the health food co-op. I took it before bed. Though it seemed to work best with 5htp and aspirin, so who knows which it was or was it the combo? Then I ran out of the mag and the jumping knee returned. But I had read in the NYTimes that pickle juice was actually proven to work for leg cramps so I would swig a little of that and it would calm down.

              Last night for my 4 th of July supper I had (organic!) hot dogs. Rather than a bun I had potato chips and pickles. They were homemade( not by me) okra pickles. They were so good I ate a quarter of the pint jar. No problems at all with the knee, slept like a puppy.

              Can pickles be considered a supplement? Rather, a necessary food. Can they even be paleo? Anyway, I am not giving them up, and may make sure I have them at night for dinner or snack. I'll see if they continue to help me sleep.

              Most of my life I have considered supplements to be expensive and not needed. When I was injured and run down in April, I asked around, and people were astonished I didn't take anything. So I took their suggestions and got vitamin c, b-12, a multi, magnesium. No vit D; I am outside every day. Had cod liver oil, a good quality one. I forget to take it most of the time. I do eat salmon, sardines, mackerel and pickled herring. Now that I am healthy again, my diet is organic, paleo, grass-fed, home raised, I forget to take the supplements, and may not replenish them. They are so expensive. As one of you said earlier, I feel it is more important to spend the money on good quality food. Which is often very expensive!!

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