Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Jerking your metabolism around

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Jerking your metabolism around

    There's a lot on the forum at the moment about the effect of long-term low carbing on metabolism versus re-feeding days which are supposed to kickstart your metabolism again. I was wondering if anyone has links to scientific findings on all this? The yo-yoing makes sense to me on one level, but is it really good to keep 'shocking' the system?
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

  • #2
    I'd think it's more in line with human history to not eat the exact same amount of calories day in and day out- nature has short, medium and long term cycles of food availability.
    Lifting Journal

    Comment


    • #3
      Here's a link to a Leangains article on this topic (though it's focused a little more on having a bigger 'cheat'/feast day, but he also mentions calorie/carb refeeding as a more regular thing):

      Cheat Day Strategies For A Hedonist | Intermittent fasting diet for fat loss, muscle gain and health

      From personal experience, when I go through a period of time, say 1-3 weeks of eating super low carb, then i have a big carb day, the next day I am less bloated and have dropped weight. My body likes consistency, but not routine (that seems like a contradiction, I know.) If I feed it consistently good food, and periodically alter some small aspect of what I'm doing, say eat 3 meals a day whenn I normally eat two, or have some extra carbs and lower fat, or eat my dinner 2-3 hours later than I normally would, somehow my body seems to function better. Eating the same thing in the same way day after day really has a negative affect on my mood.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for the link BestB - great article! I also found one from Mark: Carb Refeeding and Weight Loss | Mark's Daily Apple
        "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

        In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

        - Ray Peat

        Comment


        • #5
          YogaBare, I read the article you posted - it was good, and seems to get down to the point quickly. One thing that confuses me is why Mark seems so against carb refeeds for more overweight people...clearly there are lots of folks on this forum who have a lot of at still to loss and don't function well being low carb (under 50g). I think carb refeeds can be really valuable for everyone on the spectrum, but that's my $0.02

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Apex Predator View Post
            I'd think it's more in line with human history to not eat the exact same amount of calories day in and day out- nature has short, medium and long term cycles of food availability.
            What he said. Imo most of the time, the best question to ask oneself when in doubt is "What would our hunter-gatherer ancestors have done?"

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by BestBetter View Post
              YogaBare, I read the article you posted - it was good, and seems to get down to the point quickly. One thing that confuses me is why Mark seems so against carb refeeds for more overweight people...clearly there are lots of folks on this forum who have a lot of at still to loss and don't function well being low carb (under 50g). I think carb refeeds can be really valuable for everyone on the spectrum, but that's my $0.02
              I think it has to do with leptin levels. If you are lean and eating low carb your leptin gets depleted quite quickly. A refeed boosts leptin and balances your appetite and metabolism. An overweight person doesn't have the same leptin depletion issues, therefore a refeed is not necessary. Probably helps from a psychological perspective though. I just had my first "cheat day" in a month (lots of nuts, a pint of mascarpone and strawberry ice cream (OMG), and a bag of chocolate-covered hazelnuts) and I have to say - I feel great! I think knowing you can splurge every now and again keeps you motivated. I read an article on that too...
              "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

              In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

              - Ray Peat

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by NobleSavage View Post
                What he said. Imo most of the time, the best question to ask oneself when in doubt is "What would our hunter-gatherer ancestors have done?"
                What I'm going to say will be pretty controversial for this site... but the one aspect of this life style that doesn't resonate with me is the referral to "what our ancestors did". I find it purely speculative. The reality is that we can't know for sure what our ancestors did! I prefer to go with the scientific research - there's a a lot of it.
                "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

                In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

                - Ray Peat

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm not calorie cycling much this summer, every day is an eat day.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by fiercehunter View Post
                    I'm not calorie cycling much this summer, every day is an eat day.
                    Is that working for you? Are you at a maintenance stage?
                    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

                    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

                    - Ray Peat

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by YogaBare View Post
                      There's a lot on the forum at the moment about the effect of long-term low carbing on metabolism versus re-feeding days which are supposed to kickstart your metabolism again. I was wondering if anyone has links to scientific findings on all this? The yo-yoing makes sense to me on one level, but is it really good to keep 'shocking' the system?
                      A lot of that stuff is from the body-building community. I consider it kind of useless for an average Jane like myself. I will have sweet potatoes for lunch after sprinting in the hopes that maybe I won't get the jimmy legs or whatever, but I don't specifically try to do anything in particular with food and "jerking my metabolism around". I just eat real food. I happen to like meat and fish so I eat a lot of that, but I also like sweet potatoes and eat a lot of those.
                      Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by NobleSavage View Post
                        Imo most of the time, the best question to ask oneself when in doubt is "What would our hunter-gatherer ancestors have done?"
                        They would have invented farming and stopped hunting & gathering.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                          A lot of that stuff is from the body-building community. I consider it kind of useless for an average Jane like myself.
                          Good point.
                          "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

                          In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

                          - Ray Peat

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Having lost alot of weight (175 pounds) on low carb without refeeds or cheating, they may not really be needed until you get down to a leaner body weight. What helped me lose the weight and keep it off is routine and knowing what I can eat and cannot eat to stick at it, not cause cravings or cycles of cheating/binging/getting back on the diet, and knowing what I can eat and stay content (high fat, variety of veggies, etc.).

                            As I've gotten under 30% body fat here, I've started seeing the signs (plateau, fatigue, less energy for work outs, sleep problems) that I need to tweak what I'm doing to keep losing weight, such as IF, carb cycling and refeeds, and it's likely because I have less leptin-generating fat and it's gonna take some convincing to tell my body that it's okay to get rid of the remaining hard-to-lose fat. Only now have I started considering these things as the fat-loss mostly chugged along okay until recently. And I'm taking it slow trying these changes to see how I do with them.

                            As long as you're losing weight and your eating is good, keep doing what you're doing. If you hit a wall, you'll know it and that may be a sign to try different things such as the refeed.

                            And read Mark's post about it and some of the comments in reply to it, it sums it up quite nicely.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Apex Predator View Post
                              I'd think it's more in line with human history to not eat the exact same amount of calories day in and day out- nature has short, medium and long term cycles of food availability.
                              I agree with this. If there were serious detrimental effects to short-term fluctuations in food type and quantity, the human race would not be around today. The body is well-adapted to handle short-term variations in food quantity and quality; it's long-term issues(starvation, severe overfeeding, food quality/nutritional deficiencies) that really have the potential to wreak havoc on the body, not daily fluctuations.
                              Last edited by jsa23; 06-10-2012, 06:31 AM.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X