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Cold Water for Fat Loss, Muscle Recovery, and Increased Metabolism Thread

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  • Why take a cold bath if you could pay $135 for a shot instead?

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    • Originally posted by Sabine View Post
      Why take a cold bath if you could pay $135 for a shot instead?
      Partly because $135 is hard for seniors to come by, but by the same token, cold baths are difficult for people with mobility problems. Cold showers would scare me into a heart attack, most likely, but face dunks and ice packs are possible. A little CT is better than none. I'd probably need a dozen shots to annoy my white fat enough to leave. Heheh

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      • A dozen shots- even better.
        It reminds me of the video showing a scientist explaining his investigation into a low-carb diet for epilepsy treatment. At the end, he says in all seriousness when the interviewer asks him if he recommends this diet to epileptics, (paraphrase) "Oh, no. We don't want anyone to use the diet. We want to make a pill that produces the effects."
        I couldn't decide whether to cry or laugh.
        Unless someone can make money off it, it seems it is not worth it. How sad.

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        • Originally posted by gopintos View Post
          Okay, so why is it... I have been noticing that after I remove an ice pack from my back, shoulder blade area, that even though the skin is cool to the touch, (actually I dont think it is cool to the touch anymore) that just sitting here I have a warm sensation in that area (shoulder blade area). I am sitting here with the ceiling fan on and slightly chilled elsewhere, but in that area it feels like I have a heating pad on. I figure it has something to do with over stimulation of some sort, but it feels pretty good. Like a great big warm & fuzzy.
          Ok, another observation. I have been busy doing this and that, mostly in my kitchen, like squats to unload dishwasher, etc. and I just sat down here at my puter to take a little break, and that area between my shoulder blades, that I cold pack at night, is warm. A warm sensation. Really warm. No other area is warm. Weird, huh?
          Last edited by gopintos; 09-06-2012, 05:54 AM.
          65lbs gone and counting!!

          Fat 2 Fit - One Woman's Journey

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          • Originally posted by ljbprrfmof View Post
            Thanks. I will be doing a shower for ease of egressing. My new tub is much better for getting out, but is still a struggle.


            You are looking good quelsen. CT seems to agree with you a lot. About how many pounds have you lost?
            unfortunately that is extremely difficult to quantify, assuming you are asking as a result of CT directly.

            I can say that I have reduced 60 pounds since june 14 2012. however CT is only part of that equation.

            I can say that CT helps. it helps reduce inflammation, forces apoptosis, and changes cellular density for the better, it flushes estrogen out of the body and increases muscle strength.
            Optimum Health powered by Actualized Self-Knowledge.

            Predator not Prey
            Paleo Ketogenic Lifestyle

            CW 315 | SW 506
            Current Jeans 46 | Starting Jeans 66


            Contact me: quelsen@gmail.com

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            • Originally posted by quelsen View Post
              I can say that I have reduced 60 pounds since june 14 2012.
              ?? Since June of 2012??? WOW!!
              65lbs gone and counting!!

              Fat 2 Fit - One Woman's Journey

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              • Originally posted by gopintos View Post
                ?? Since June of 2012??? WOW!!
                thanks, i feel compelled to say that this is a lot of luck and a lot of being an asshole.

                that is how i characterize myself, an asshole.

                i didnt plan well for my trip to myrtle beach and found that on the return trip i had nothing to eat and dinner didnt last me

                I didnt eat until we got back into town 10 hours later... i would rather die than eat poison.... period... there is no middle ground
                Optimum Health powered by Actualized Self-Knowledge.

                Predator not Prey
                Paleo Ketogenic Lifestyle

                CW 315 | SW 506
                Current Jeans 46 | Starting Jeans 66


                Contact me: quelsen@gmail.com

                Comment


                • Originally posted by quelsen View Post
                  thanks, i feel compelled to say that this is a lot of luck and a lot of being an asshole.
                  that is how i characterize myself, an asshole.
                  i didnt plan well for my trip to myrtle beach and found that on the return trip i had nothing to eat and dinner didnt last me
                  I didnt eat until we got back into town 10 hours later... i would rather die than eat poison.... period... there is no middle ground
                  That's not being an asshole. That's being strong with courage in your convictions.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by gopintos View Post
                    Ok, another observation...that area between my shoulder blades, that I cold pack at night, is warm. A warm sensation. Really warm. No other area is warm. Weird, huh?
                    I notice this, too. Maybe it means our BAT is working!

                    Originally posted by quelsen View Post
                    unfortunately that is extremely difficult to quantify, assuming you are asking as a result of CT directly.
                    I know what you mean, I am doing so much, it's hard to say what is attributed to CT, seasonal eating, avoiding blue light after dark, and not eating sugar, grain or vegetable oils...

                    Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
                    That's not being an asshole. That's being strong with courage in your convictions.
                    Paleobird- you're an asshole! (That's gonna be the new compliment around here)

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                    • This thread triggered a long dormant memory from many years ago. I read a book about a Great White Tracker (who is likely still kicking) somewhere in mainland USA. AS a kid growing up next to some Indians (that's what he called them - now they're natives), he was semi-adopted by his best friend's grandfather. Grandfather taught him the old ways of tracking, the art of invisibility, etc. But the part relevant to this discussion is how the old man taught him not to fear the cold, but embrace it. When he was about 10, Grandfather took the boys out on a nippy snowy day in winter, then asked them to remove all their clothing save for underpants. I'm not sure if they kept their boots on, kinda think they did. The upshot was that this skinny freezing kid shivered for a bit, then suddenly he tossed his friend into a snowbank, then was tossed himself, and then they laughed and played all the way back to Grandfather's house. After that incident, he never dressed again in heavy clothes. He bragged that while others are bundled to the hilt, he's out in a single layer flannel shirt, sometimes with the collar opened. I never took note of any other benefits, but I'm sure there were some. In this case, his adaptation took a matter of minutes or hours, not days or weeks. Makes us look wimpy, doesn't it? ;-)

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                      • I have begun some CT things, myself.

                        I have found the cold shower thing to work for me if I start with a warm-ish shower, then after a few minutes start slowing adjusting the temp down... wait for it to feel "warm" on my skin, then adjust down again. I got it down to straight cold water, most of it hitting me square in the upper back area, after about 10 minutes. Then, I just hunkered in and let it pour over me for another 10 or so (I need to set a timer, I think. Or, get a clock where I can see it in the shower).

                        I've done one cold bath. I think I caused a muscle spasm in my back trying that... it was really, really difficult to get myself to lay back in the water, and my muscles refused to relax. I'll keep doing the showers until I get more used to it before I do a bath again.

                        I've also been putting an ice pack on my belly, while watching movies at night. For about an hour. I get really pink under it. What I really need is a whole body ice outfit, to target ALL the fat. *grin*

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                        • Originally posted by RaeVynn View Post
                          What I really need is a whole body ice outfit, to target ALL the fat. *grin*
                          www.coolfatburner.com

                          $60 or look it over and make your own!

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                          • I've been thinking a lot lately about this cooling glove they are working on at Stanford Stanford researchers' cooling glove 'better than steroids'

                            In the article it states, "...networks of veins, known as AVAs (arteriovenous anastomoses) seem exclusively devoted to rapid temperature management. They don't supply nutrition to the skin, and they have highly variable blood flow, ranging from negligible in cold weather to as much as 60 percent of total cardiac output during hot weather or exercise.

                            In humans, AVAs show up in several places, including the face and feet, but the researchers' glove targets our most prominent radiator structures – in the palms of our hands.

                            The newest version of the device is a rigid plastic mitt, attached by a hose to what looks like a portable cooler. When Grahn sticks his hand in the airtight glove, the device creates a slight vacuum. The veins in the palm expand, drawing blood into the AVAs, where it is rapidly cooled by water circulating through the glove's plastic lining.

                            The method is more convenient than, say, full-body submersion in ice water, and avoids the pitfalls of other rapid palm-cooling strategies. Because blood flow to the AVAs can be nearly shut off in cold weather, making the hand too cold will have almost no effect on core temperature. Cooling, Grahn says, is therefore a delicate balance.

                            "You have to stay above the local vasoconstriction threshold," said Grahn. "And what do you get if you go under? You get a cold hand."


                            OK. Me again. Now, taking into account these AVA's in our hands, here we have a built-in mechanism for interacting with the environment. Maybe cold showers and ice baths are not needed, maybe just cooling the hands will suffice. Remember being a kid and taking off your gloves so you could make a nice, hard snowball to pelt your buddy with? I think this winter I will be experimenting with cold hands a little. Maybe if anybody else wants to get into this CT thing easier than cold showers, just try handling ice or soaking hands in ice water.

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                            • This study looks at AVA and cold response: Thermal responses to whole-body cooling in air with special reference to arteriovenous anastomoses in fingers - Vanggaard - 2012 - Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging - Wiley Online Library

                              The arteriovenous anastomoses (AVAs) in the distal parts of the extremities play a significant role in the heat exchange with the environment. The aim of the study was to examine the thermal responses to whole-body cooling in air, and especially the behaviour of finger skin temperature (Tf, rich in AVAs). Eight young men sat in minimal clothing at 32C air temperature (Ta), which was then lowered gradually to 13C in 100 min. In the beginning of cooling, Tf was high and fluctuating, and then suddenly exhibited a rapid fall, while temperatures in other skin sites fell fairly linearly along decreasing Ta to the end of cooling. During the period from start to the rapid fall in Tf, rectal temperature decreased from 374C (SD 02) to 372C (02), mean skin temperature (Tsk) from 346C (05) to 312C (20) and whole-body thermal sensation from ‘slightly warm/warm’ to ‘slightly cool/cold’. The start of the steep fall in Tf varied considerably between individuals in terms of time (2–75 min), Ta (167–320C) and Tsk (288–347C). On the other hand, the range of Tf at that point was narrower (321–358C). The findings stress the importance of taking into account the distal skin temperatures in thermoregulatory studies in addition to the ordinarily used more proximal and central skin sites. Also, it might be advisable to start such experiments with relatively high and fluctuating Tf to guarantee that the thermal state of the subject is well defined.

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                              • And this one: Influence of Cold Water Immersion on Limb and Cutaneous Blood Flow at Rest

                                Background: Cold water immersion reduces exercise-induced muscle damage. Benefits may partly arise from a decline in limb blood flow; however, no study has comprehensively investigated the influence of different degrees of cooling undertaken via cold water immersion on limb blood flow responses.

                                Purpose: To determine the influence of cold (8C) and cool (22C) water immersion on lower limb and cutaneous blood flow.

                                Study Design: Controlled laboratory study.

                                Methods: Nine men were placed in a semireclined position and lowered into 8C or 22C water to the iliac crest for two 5-minute periods interspersed with 2 minutes of nonimmersion. Rectal and thigh skin temperature, deep and superficial muscle temperature, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, thigh cutaneous blood velocity (laser Doppler), and superficial femoral artery blood flow (duplex ultrasound) were measured during immersion and for 30 minutes after immersion. Indices of vascular conductance were calculated (flux and blood flow/mean arterial pressure).

                                Results: Reductions in rectal temperature (8C, 0.2 0.1C; 22C, 0.1 0.1C) and thigh skin temperature (8C, 6.2 0.5C; 22C, 3.2 0.2C) were greater in 8C water than in 22C (P < .01). Femoral artery conductance was reduced to a similar extent immediately after immersion (~30%) and 30 minutes after immersion (~40%) under both conditions (P < .01). In contrast, there was less thigh cutaneous vasoconstriction during and after immersion in 8C water compared with 22C (P = .01).

                                Conclusion: These data suggest that immersion at both temperatures resulted in similar whole limb blood flow but, paradoxically, more blood was distributed to the skin in the colder water. This suggests that colder temperatures may be associated with reduced muscle blood flow, which could provide an explanation for the benefits of cold water immersion in alleviating exercise-induced muscle damage in sports and athletic contexts.

                                Clinical Relevance: Colder water temperatures may be more effective in the treatment of exercise-induced muscle damage and injury rehabilitation because of greater reductions in muscle blood flow

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