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Cold Water for Fat Loss, Muscle Recovery, and Increased Metabolism Thread

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  • I've been using CT for about 1.5 months now (ice baths, cold showers, ice packs) and for the first time in my life my basal body temperature is above 98! It used to be chronically low (on average 96.7 at waking, 97.2 - 97.6 during the day).

    It's now averaging 98.1. Fingers crossed that I can coax it up to 98.6 and maintain it there even when winter comes around.

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    • Originally posted by BestBetter View Post
      I've been using CT for about 1.5 months now (ice baths, cold showers, ice packs) and for the first time in my life my basal body temperature is above 98! It used to be chronically low (on average 96.7 at waking, 97.2 - 97.6 during the day).

      It's now averaging 98.1. Fingers crossed that I can coax it up to 98.6 and maintain it there even when winter comes around.
      I experienced the same thing. I would guess that CT is similar to the sugar loading that Danny Roddy is talking about--increases cellular activity and in turn body temp.

      I have been avoiding much CT this summer, eating lots of seasonal fruits, but plan on going full-bore ketogenic and lots of CT starting in October. I think my metabolism is right on track with this plan, I have felt great this summer and not gaining weight despite eating lots of carbs and sugar from fruit. I try to get 30 minutes of full sun (shirtless) everyday, have a great tan and hopefully lots of Vit D. I have a full set of labs scheduled for Sep 25th.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by ricks View Post
        In the 1980s, while continuing his research on the effects of Whole Body Cryotherapy, Dr.Yamaguchi and his associates came to the conclusion that rapid short-term freezing of the skin’s surface to a temperature of approximately 30F while inside the cryosauna has a more beneficial effect on the human body than its gradual cooling while immersed in an ice bath, where the lowest temperature possible is approximately 41F.

        As a result of Dr. Yamaguchi’s research, along with several other medical professionals around the world, modern medicine is able to understand what happens to the body when inside the cryosauna and what the ultimate benefits may be.
        Cryo-USA >> Origins
        personal experience calls bullshit on this description at cryousa
        Optimum Health powered by Actualized Self-Knowledge.

        Predator not Prey
        Paleo Ketogenic Lifestyle

        CW 315 | SW 506
        Current Jeans 46 | Starting Jeans 66


        Contact me: quelsen@gmail.com

        Comment


        • I really can't understand why people who have never tried CT are so quick to dismiss it. It's really starting to irritate me. I can understand that a lot of people might not WANT to do it, because hey, it involves some serious mind over matter, but no one ever said they should. It's not like CT fans are posting on every thread that CT is the cure for every ailment, like a particular iodine person i have in mind...

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          • Originally posted by BestBetter View Post
            I really can't understand why people who have never tried CT are so quick to dismiss it. It's really starting to irritate me. I can understand that a lot of people might not WANT to do it, because hey, it involves some serious mind over matter, but no one ever said they should. It's not like CT fans are posting on every thread that CT is the cure for every ailment, like a particular iodine person i have in mind...
            I got really tired of trying to convince people to do it. I don't have to defend crap, it works, it's repeatable, it works for everybody. Basically, CT is my master tweak to paleo that keeps me right where I want to be. Here's another 'hack' for ya'all: When you get in a cold bathtub, take a small swig of sesame oil and swish it around your teeth and gums for 20 minutes or so, then spit it out in the trashcan (or sink if you don't care about your pipes getting oily). I'll let you figure out what that's all about--hint, it's called 'oil pulling'.

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            • Originally posted by otzi View Post
              I got really tired of trying to convince people to do it. I don't have to defend crap, it works, it's repeatable, it works for everybody. Basically, CT is my master tweak to paleo that keeps me right where I want to be. Here's another 'hack' for ya'all: When you get in a cold bathtub, take a small swig of sesame oil and swish it around your teeth and gums for 20 minutes or so, then spit it out in the trashcan (or sink if you don't care about your pipes getting oily). I'll let you figure out what that's all about--hint, it's called 'oil pulling'.
              I do it with water, salty water, but why seasame oil. i have used coconut
              Optimum Health powered by Actualized Self-Knowledge.

              Predator not Prey
              Paleo Ketogenic Lifestyle

              CW 315 | SW 506
              Current Jeans 46 | Starting Jeans 66


              Contact me: quelsen@gmail.com

              Comment


              • Originally posted by quelsen View Post
                I do it with water, salty water, but why seasame oil. i have used coconut
                Sesame oil was the original oil used for this, so it's what I use. It has some 'magical' properties from the sesamin and sesamol, two chemicals found in sesame oil. Please research if you like, but let's not turn this into an oil-pulling thread, I think there are a few of those out there already. In closing, the mouth has leptin sensors, flooding these receptors with sesame oil activates the leptin pathways. Additionally, oral health is directly related to whole-body health. Healthy teeth and gums are a must for overall health.

                From Wikipedia:

                Vitamins and minerals
                Sesame oil is a source of vitamin E.[15] Vitamin E is an antioxidant and has been correlated with lowering cholesterol levels.[16] Sesame oil also contains magnesium, copper, calcium, iron, zinc, and vitamin B6. Copper provides relief for rheumatoid arthritis. Magnesium supports vascular and respiratory health. Calcium helps prevent colon cancer, osteoporosis, migraine, and PMS. Zinc promotes bone health.

                Besides being rich in vitamin E, there is insufficient research on the medicinal properties of sesame oil. However, the following claims have been made.

                [edit] Blood pressure
                Sesame oil has a high percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids[17] (omega-6 fatty acids)—but it is unique in that it keeps at room temperature. This is because it contains two naturally occurring preservatives, sesamol and sesamin. (Normally, only oils predominately composed of the omega-9 monounsaturated oil, like olive oil, keep at room temperature.)

                It has been suggested that due to the presence of high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in sesame oil, it may help to control blood pressure. It could be used in cooking in place of other edible oils and to help reduce high blood pressure and lower the amount of medication needed to control hypertension.[18]

                The effect of the oil on blood pressure may be due to polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and the compound sesamin, a lignan present in sesame oil. There is evidence suggesting that both compounds reduce blood pressure in hypertensive rats. Sesame lignans also inhibit the synthesis and absorption of cholesterol in these rats.

                [edit] Oil pulling
                Sesame oil is one of the few oils recommended for use in oil pulling.[19] (Sunflower oil is the other oil recommended.)

                [edit] General claims
                While not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, sesame oil is reputed to have a number of therapeutic uses.

                It is suggested that regular topical application and/or consumption of sesame oil should mitigate effects[20] of anxiety, nerve and bone disorders, poor circulation, lowered immunity and bowel problems. It is suggested such use would also relieve lethargy, fatigue, and insomnia, while promoting strength and vitality, enhancing blood circulation. There are claims that its use has relaxing properties which eases pain and muscle spasm, such as sciatica, dysmenorrhoea, colic, backache, and joint pain.

                Sesame oil when used in infant massage, it is claimed, helps to calm babies and lull them to sleep and improves growth of the brain and the nervous system.[21] These are claims similar to other therapeutic medicines, that its having antioxidants explains beliefs that it slows the aging process and promotes longevity. A 2000 medical study showed that infant massage with sesame oil improved the weight, length, and midarm and midleg circumferences of infants at a statistically more favorable rate than all other oils tested.[22]

                It is suggested that sesame oil, when consumed and/or topically applied, should relieve dryness both externally and internally. Sesame oil is sometimes recommended to alleviate the dryness associated with menopause.[23] It is believed that its use "restores moisture to the skin, keeping it soft, flexible and young looking". It is suggested that it relieves "dryness of joints" and bowels, and eases symptoms of dryness such as irritating coughs, cracking joints, and hard stools. Since "dryness of joints" is not a medically classifiable condition, it would be difficult to medically comprehend or verify these claims of panacea.

                Other uses include as a laxative, as a remedy for toothaches and gum disease[24] and in the treatment of blurred vision, dizziness, and headaches.[13]

                It is suggested that sesame oil could be used in the treatment of dry nose, reduction of cholesterol levels (due to presence of lignans which are phytoestrogens), anti-bacterial effects, and even slowing down certain types of cancer (due to the anti-oxidant properties of the lignans).[25]
                Last edited by otzi; 07-12-2012, 09:26 AM.

                Comment


                • Yo, do many of you do cold showers directly after a HIIT session? I know it helps with muscle soreness, but would the other effects be mitigated due to you already running so hot that your really just chilling a bit rather than going deep.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
                    Yo, do many of you do cold showers directly after a HIIT session? I know it helps with muscle soreness, but would the other effects be mitigated due to you already running so hot that your really just chilling a bit rather than going deep.
                    The only showers I take now are cold showers.

                    Which effects are you specifically thinking of? I don't think it would be a 'waste' to take cold showers after a HIIT session, but you might want to wait a few hours before doing something more intense like an ice bath.

                    Someone posted an interesting article about the effects of CT directly after a workout. When I get a chance I'll see if I can find the link I'm thinking of unless someone else can give you a better answer.

                    Comment


                    • Otzi, I've been reading up on oil pulling, I plan to give it a try tomorrow morning. From what I was reading, sesame oil and sunflower were the two recommended, but the same article also said to not use an oil you wouldn't want to consume, and I definitely wouldn't want to consume either of those, so I'm planning to try with coconut oil. One more notch on my belt of weirdoness!

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
                        Yo, do many of you do cold showers directly after a HIIT session? I know it helps with muscle soreness, but would the other effects be mitigated due to you already running so hot that your really just chilling a bit rather than going deep.
                        A cold shower may feel good, but won't help with delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), for that you need cold water immersion as described here: Medscape: Medscape Access

                        "Cold-water immersion may reduce DOMS after exercise, but the best method of immersion and potential harms associated with the approach remain unclear, according to a new analysis.

                        Chris Bleakley, PhD, from Health and Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of Ulster, School of Health Sciences, United Kingdom, and colleagues reported the findings in an article published online February 15 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

                        "Having started in elite level sport, [cold-water immersion] is becoming increasingly popular amongst amateur athletes," the authors write. Immediately after exercise, athletes immerse themselves in cold water, although duration and temperature may vary.

                        Athletes have used cold-water therapy in the past to reduce pain and swelling resulting from acute soft tissue injuries, such as sprains. "It is proposed that cooling tissue immediately after exercise could have the same anti-inflammatory effect, thereby reducing the potential for [DOMS]," the authors note.

                        The study sought to determine the effects of cold-water immersion in the management of muscle soreness after exercise by conducting a search of the literature and reviewing studies on the topic.

                        The authors searched various databases for randomized or quasi-randomized trials testing cold-water immersion. They identified 17 trials that included 366 participants. Water temperatures and immersion time ranged between 5C and 15C and from 3 to 24 minutes, respectively.

                        According to the researchers, the overall quality of the studies available was low. Of the trials, 14 compared cold-water immersion applied after exercise with passive treatment involving rest or no treatment.

                        These trials indicated that cold-water immersion reduced muscle soreness at 24, 48, 72, and even 96 hours after exercise compared with passive treatment. At 24 hours, the standardized mean difference [SMD] was −0.55 (95% confidence interval [CI], −0.84 to −0.27; 10 trials); at 48 hours, the SMD was −0.66 (95% CI, −0.97 to −0.35; 8 trials); at 72 hours, the SMD was −0.93 (95% CI, −1.36 to −0.51; 4 trials); and at 96 hours, the SMD was −0.58; 95% CI, −1.00 to −0.16; 5 trials).

                        Four trials suggested that participants considered that cold-water immersion improved recovery or reduced fatigue immediately afterward.

                        Complications and adverse effects were not evaluated in the trials. Therefore, Dr. Bleakley and colleagues could draw no conclusions about the safety of this approach.

                        According to the authors, only limited data in 5 studies were available for comparing cold-water immersion vs other active recovery techniques such as warm or contrasting (alternative warm/cold) water immersion, light jogging, and compression stockings. These comparisons showed no appreciable differences.

                        "This review provides some evidence that cold-water immersion reduces delayed onset muscle soreness after exercise when compared with passive interventions involving rest or no intervention," the authors conclude.

                        "It is not clear whether such variations in treatment parameters affect clinical outcomes," they add. "Interestingly, our subgroup analysis found no differences between single and multiple cold-water immersions based on muscle soreness outcome."

                        The authors have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

                        Cochrane Database Syst Rev. Published online February 15, 2012. Summary "

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by BestBetter View Post
                          Otzi, I've been reading up on oil pulling, I plan to give it a try tomorrow morning. From what I was reading, sesame oil and sunflower were the two recommended, but the same article also said to not use an oil you wouldn't want to consume, and I definitely wouldn't want to consume either of those, so I'm planning to try with coconut oil. One more notch on my belt of weirdoness!
                          I think that just means, 'don't use motor oil'. By all means try coconut oil, but I think sesame oil is where it's at due to the chemical compounds in it. I've tried CO, but it starts out solid and is pretty nasty at first. Sesame oil has a nutty, burnt flavor and is very easy to get used to. Make sure ingredients are: Sesame Oil

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                          • Wanted to bring this back from the dead. Although it's still hot (at least where I am), CT is right around the corner as we get into Autumn/Winter.

                            I have some big plans with experiments this winter. Anyone else?

                            Comment


                            • First off, try and get Vit D levels up before SAD sets in. You may postpone it entirely. I no longer require arm coverings even in heat waves, and all I've done are love handle chillings with gel packs. I'm hoping to lower my house temperature this winter to a more reasonable figure than 70*F, and possibly distinctly lower. And that may activate some needed fat burning. I can't do most cold water experiments due to motility problems, but icing, I can do! Paysan

                              Comment


                              • I was reading a really interesting article written by a team of medical doctors about thyroid issues and came across this passage buried in the middle:

                                When serum levels of iodine drop, the hypothalmus secretes thyroid releasing hormone (TRH) from nerve endings in the medial eminence of the hypothalmus. Another form of stimulation that encourages the hypothalmus to produce TRH is prolonged exposure to cold.

                                The article wasn't about CT, but I thought it was pretty cool to see that doctors are starting to acknowledge the benefits of it.


                                DrWells.net : Nutrition

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