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  • #16
    Originally posted by girlhk View Post
    I'm reading Fiber Menace and find myself thinking a lot about my fiber intake. I eat a lot of vegetables, especially broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, spinach, green leafies because I like them.

    I used to have daily bowel movements, but since increasing meat intake and cutting grains, I only have bowel movements 3 times a week. It's not the frequency that concerns me, but that I sometimes have to strain (sorry if TMI). This straining is new to me. I would consider myself somewhat constipated. I have been trying to figure out how to improve this.

    I've started taking kefir daily, but have not noticed any improvement.

    Would lowering fiber consumption improve constipation? What vegetables should I eat instead? I don't eat salads or veggies raw (don't like it..)

    Any advice or suggestions would be appreciated!
    You are probably in a Cal/Magnesium imbalance. Too much Calcium dries up the colon content, also putting the colon asleep. Magnesium retains water in the colon and also tells the intestine to move things foward.

    A proper cal/mag balance is important.

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    • #17
      Also, another thing I've been doing lately to reduce fiber is to juice my vegetables. I have a cheapie juicer (Hamilton Beach, less than $30, I think, and it works pretty well, not too annoying to clean afterwards) and I've been juicing leafy greens like kale and dandelion along with carrots and celery and maybe an apple. I think this is a great solution to not have to cut out too many veggies, still get good nutrition from a broad array of foods, but have almost zero fiber to clog up the digestive tubes.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by TARNIP View Post
        I also have had IBS for many years now (same as yourself with constipation and abdominal bloating and pain) and found that cutting out grains and increasing veg, salads, fruit made it sooo much worse!! Thank you so much for the information! I have also started taking an L-Glutamine supplement which has worked well, and coconut oil (in small doses first!).
        I am starting to feel like a broken record, because I think this is the 20th time I've been on my soapbox about Fiber Menace in the past week! I bet when people see I've posted something, they're thinking 'there she goes again about fiber', but I really wish someone somewhere would have mentioned this to me years ago. To think of all time I wasted and all that needless pain I caused myself eating all that 'healthy fiber'. I'm glad to hear you're getting some relief - that L-Glutamine stuff really works wonders, it just takes time!

        I'm also trying to drink bone broth now to help my guts heal - I got some stock bones from the farmers market yesterday, and I plan to keep my crockpot on perpetual simmer, and drink a cup or two everyday, just keep replenishing the water. My first cup today was soooooooooo fatty, I almost couldn't drink it. Better be doing some good down below!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by BestBetter View Post
          I am starting to feel like a broken record, because I think this is the 20th time I've been on my soapbox about Fiber Menace in the past week! I bet when people see I've posted something, they're thinking 'there she goes again about fiber', but I really wish someone somewhere would have mentioned this to me years ago. To think of all time I wasted and all that needless pain I caused myself eating all that 'healthy fiber'.
          I hear ya! HillsideGina told me about it when I was fresh out of the ER after I tore my colon and sent the contents of my it swimming around in parts of my body it was supposed to be keeping it out of! The pain was like childbirth multiplied, and I had big babies with no pain meds. This was worse. I actually passed out on the bathroom floor and woke up in a huge puddle of sweat. Scared the bejeebers out of The Boyfriend.

          The doctor (of course) gave me serious antibiotics (after all kinds of tests), said I was otherwise completely healthy and told me to up my fiber intake. I was asking here about high fiber veggies and, lucky for me, HillsideGina pointed me toward Fiber Menace. I haven't had a problem since.
          Durp.

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          • #20
            Wow, RitaRosa, I can't IMAGINE going through that! So glad you got better - maybe we can double-team on the low-fiber crusade, ha!

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            • #21
              How many grams of fiber do you get a day?
              How about fat grams?
              I have ibs constipation so I'm going for lower fiber more fat if it has worked for you...???

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              • #22
                There is a lot of information out there that suggest fiber really causes a lot of irritation in the bowel movements. Then we have the Massai Warriors who lived on meat, milk, and blood. They weren't getting any fiber at all and didn't suffer. This just one of many civilizations that thrived on no fiber.

                In my experience fiber really irritates my gut and bowels. Increased fat, more moderate protein, and fermented foods do wonders.
                Paleo since November 2011 - Carnivore since June 2012
                Before and after pics
                http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread65846.html
                Primal Sucess Story
                http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread65400.html
                Primal Journal
                http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...tml#post955444

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                • #23
                  Fiber from lentils gives me gas, so I started to eat less. When I was vegetarian, lentils were my main source of protein, so I just lived with the gas and bloating.

                  I still eat fibrous veggies, e.g. cabbage, cauliflower, spinach, bitter gourd, okra, etc. I think I was eating a ton of veggies before because I was trying to eat less starch/grains, and haven't upped fat enough (people raise an eye when they see me eating more fat). Still, I wonder if the fiber mentioned in Fiber Menace is mostly grains, legumes, etc, or does it also include all those veggies. I really like green veggies, cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, etc, but too much give me gas.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by girlhk View Post
                    Still, I wonder if the fiber mentioned in Fiber Menace is mostly grains, legumes, etc, or does it also include all those veggies. I really like green veggies, cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, etc, but too much give me gas.
                    There are two types of fiber: soluble and insoluble.

                    Soluble fiber is the 'good' fiber. This type of fiber can be digested, and supports the probiotic gut flora. Examples of soluble fiber are things like apple and potato (without the peel).

                    Insoluble fiber is the type that is very irritating to the digestive system because it can not be digested since we don't produce the enzyme, cellulase, which is required to break it down. Since we must rely on our gut bacteria to ferment this type of fiber, eating excessive amounts of it often causes bloating and inflammation, due to the gas build-up from the fermentation in the gut.

                    Vegetables are primarily made of cellulose, which is insoluble fiber. With certain types, you can reduce this by peeling and deseeding them, or running them through a juicer to separate the fiber or cooking them, but others you just have to accept that you might not be able to eat as much of them if you want to heal.

                    Grains and legumes are problematic because the outer coating generally contains insoluble fiber (much like the peel of vegetables and fruits), which can't be easily separated. White rice, for example, has had the outer germ layer removed, so it doesn't contain this problematic insoluble fiber (nor the anti-nutrients).
                    Last edited by BestBetter; 11-03-2012, 01:34 PM.

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                    • #25
                      Broccoli definitely gave me lots of gas, constipation and make my crap really dark. I went on a broccoli binge a year ago cause I thought it was good for you but now I'm not so sure.

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                      • #26
                        Appreciate this thread and the posters who renewed it. I was told by a dietician how fiber wd. blunt the rise of Blood Sugar therefore eat whole grain bread, etc. I was eating whole grains all and I ended up as previously mentioned bloated, and could've been a horn section for a jazz band. More is better, right? Lentils , etc. are a no-no for me now as I understand they will work against blood sugar control. "Whole-wheat" bread will spike BS not much differently than white bread. I tend to cook my vegetables (mostly sauteing in butter, coconut oil or palm oil)and then add them to meat in a simmering sauce. So far doing OK this way but need to expand my culinary palette a bit. BTW good post BB on the types of fiber. Like I mentioned, good thread. I see myself getting the aformentioned book.

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                        • #27
                          In my experience fiber really irritates my gut and bowels. Increased fat, more moderate protein, and fermented foods do wonders.[/QUOTE]

                          I was considering getting to this point- only fiber will be coming from fermented veggies.

                          Makes me ask- has anyone gone with only doing meats and juicing the veggies ( no fiber)?
                          I would LOVE to hear how that went or is going?

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by BennettC View Post
                            There is a lot of information out there that suggest fiber really causes a lot of irritation in the bowel movements. Then we have the Massai Warriors who lived on meat, milk, and blood. They weren't getting any fiber at all and didn't suffer. This just one of many civilizations that thrived on no fiber.

                            In my experience fiber really irritates my gut and bowels. Increased fat, more moderate protein, and fermented foods do wonders.
                            You are making this up.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by BestBetter View Post
                              There are two types of fiber: soluble and insoluble.

                              Soluble fiber is the 'good' fiber. This type of fiber can be digested, and supports the probiotic gut flora. Examples of soluble fiber are things like apple and potato (without the peel).

                              Insoluble fiber is the type that is very irritating to the digestive system because it can not be digested since we don't produce the enzyme, cellulase, which is required to break it down. Since we must rely on our gut bacteria to ferment this type of fiber, eating excessive amounts of it often causes bloating and inflammation, due to the gas build-up from the fermentation in the gut.

                              Vegetables are primarily made of cellulose, which is insoluble fiber. With certain types, you can reduce this by peeling and deseeding them, or running them through a juicer to separate the fiber or cooking them, but others you just have to accept that you might not be able to eat as much of them if you want to heal.

                              Grains and legumes are problematic because the outer coating generally contains insoluble fiber (much like the peel of vegetables and fruits), which can't be easily separated. White rice, for example, has had the outer germ layer removed, so it doesn't contain this problematic insoluble fiber (nor the anti-nutrients).

                              Best butter- do you know if our body (intestines) absorbs all the plant mass when they are cooked? When I eat "raw" veggies my stools are more so, but if I "cook" veg. I have No stools? I don't get it??

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Alykat View Post
                                Best butter- do you know if our body (intestines) absorbs all the plant mass when they are cooked? When I eat "raw" veggies my stools are more so, but if I "cook" veg. I have No stools? I don't get it??
                                Best butter, I like that

                                From what I've read, although certain nutrients, like some enzymes or vitamin C, are destroyed during cooking, for the most part cooking actually makes the nutrients in veggies and other foods more bioavailable.

                                This is an interesting paleo/primalish nutritional blog that kind of sums it up well:

                                Put Down That Kale Smoothie – Why You Should Cook Your Food | Radiance Nutrtion

                                This article by Chris Kresser, one of my fave paleo-ish doctors says if you have digestive problems, peel+deseed everything, lay off the veggies taht are high in insoluble fiber, and whatever you do eat, make sure it's cooked:

                                Got digestive problems? Take it easy on the veggies.

                                And this one is short, but I found it interesting:

                                Fact or Fiction: Raw veggies are healthier than cooked ones: Scientific American

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