Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Metabolic Advantage

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Metabolic Advantage

    Hi all,

    I've seen Mark mention the metabolic advantage that comes with burning fat for fuel, as having seen many posters mention it as well. I was wondering if anyone could provide me with links to some scientific studies that would be able to explain this process. Every time I search I can only find articles that mention it without actually going into detail. Any help would be much appreciated.

    Regards,
    JT

  • #2
    look for some stuff by volek and phinney, eads, or waroninsulin.com for pro

    look at colpo and mcdonald for con.

    theres more but i'm typing with one hand....of that crew i think phinney and volek are the only published ones.

    from what i've read my conclusion is the advantage is in body composition, satiety, therapeutic applications and metabolic flexibility.

    a starting point....http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/3/1/9
    Last edited by Neckhammer; 04-29-2012, 01:41 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      That was a very interesting article thank you. It seemed like each neutral or negative effect of the VLCARB diet was seen in studies that were only conducted over the short term, it would be interesting to see how those numbers changed when the study was conducted for an extended period of time.

      Also, would you consider most primal diets to be what they consider "very low carb"? I'm sure that term is loosely applied as it probably varies from person to person. I would imagine very low carb= < 50g a day?

      Comment


      • #4
        Google Atkins Fat Fast, Keckiwick & Pawan published in Lancet in 1957. A diet high in fat and without carbs found to be metabolically superior to any other eating patterns including fasting for burning off body fat stores.

        Comment


        • #5
          And this is how misinformation gets spread....
          http://stackingplates.com/

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by jtrain_36 View Post
            That was a very interesting article thank you. It seemed like each neutral or negative effect of the VLCARB diet was seen in studies that were only conducted over the short term, it would be interesting to see how those numbers changed when the study was conducted for an extended period of time.

            Also, would you consider most primal diets to be what they consider "very low carb"? I'm sure that term is loosely applied as it probably varies from person to person. I would imagine very low carb= < 50g a day?
            I've seen studies with 15-20% carbohydrate still labeled low carb....that is consistent with the 50-100g recs in the PB carb curve for many, but as to VLC most would define that as <50g.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by StackingPlates View Post
              And this is how misinformation gets spread....
              He asked for studies. If you have some post em. Heck i'm all for reading what anyones studies, as it seems the op is. I mean he specifically asked for studies rather than opinion columns(even though i did mention some opinion posters previously). Not a bad start by OP IMO. I'll keep future posts to the literature

              Comment


              • #8
                http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...aFGb_A&cad=rja

                This is more of a review of the literature, but you could follow the citations to the actual studies. Volek IS in the pro camp.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Read gnolls.org. After reading about him climbing Mt. Whitney fasted I really wanted that kind of metabolic flexibility (and eventually got it).

                  Occasional Insanity Outperforms Daily Misery: Day-Hiking Mt. Whitney, Fasted &#45; GNOLLS.ORG
                  Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by StackingPlates View Post
                    And this is how misinformation gets spread....
                    If you have any scientific studies to show I would love to read them. I am still very hesitant to believe in the metabolic advantage as I had been raised to believe that a calorie is a calorie. However, I am open minded and have been reading stories and studies saying what we've long thought about nutrition, and specifically weight loss, isn't necessarily true. I'm hoping to read into both sides of the argument and come to a logical conclusion based on my own experience as well.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jtrain_36 View Post
                      Hi all,

                      I've seen Mark mention the metabolic advantage that comes with burning fat for fuel, as having seen many posters mention it as well. I was wondering if anyone could provide me with links to some scientific studies that would be able to explain this process. Every time I search I can only find articles that mention it without actually going into detail. Any help would be much appreciated.

                      Regards,
                      JT
                      Mitochondrial β-Oxidation Reactions
                      The oxidation of fatty acids yields significantly more energy per carbon atom than does the oxidation of carbohydrates. The net result of the oxidation of one mole of oleic acid (an 18-carbon fatty acid) will be 146 moles of ATP (2 mole equivalents are used during the activation of the fatty acid), as compared with 114 moles from an equivalent number of glucose carbon atoms.
                      Ketogenesis
                      During high rates of fatty acid oxidation, primarily in the liver, large amounts of acetyl-CoA are generated. These exceed the capacity of the TCA cycle, and one result is the synthesis of ketone bodies. The synthesis of the ketone bodies (ketogenesis) occurs in the mitochondria allowing this process to be intimately coupled to rate of hepatic fatty acid oxidation. Conversely, the utilization of the ketones (ketolysis) occurs in the cytosol. The ketone bodies are acetoacetate, β-hydroxybutyrate, and acetone.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
                        http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...aFGb_A&cad=rja

                        This is more of a review of the literature, but you could follow the citations to the actual studies. Volek IS in the pro camp.
                        It seems as if this states that while calories are important overall, that weight loss is more effective on a low carb diet. I'm more inclined to agree with this than those that say you can eat whatever you want as long as you maintain low carb. That just seems a little too far-fetched to me, but who knows.

                        Also, interesting to see that in Volek's studies the low carb without resistance training still managed to lose quite a bit of muscle. That seems to go against some of what I've read, always nice to see differing opinions explained well.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                          Read gnolls.org. After reading about him climbing Mt. Whitney fasted I really wanted that kind of metabolic flexibility (and eventually got it).

                          Occasional Insanity Outperforms Daily Misery: Day-Hiking Mt. Whitney, Fasted - GNOLLS.ORG
                          Those were some incredible pictures to go along with a pretty darn good accomplishment. Thanks for posting that, I've been able to workout in a fasted state but nothing to that extent. I guess we all still have goals to shoot for, huh?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jtrain_36 View Post
                            I am still very hesitant to believe in the metabolic advantage as I had been raised to believe that a calorie is a calorie.
                            The body doesn't burn calories. It burns ATP.

                            Lucas Tafur: Bioenergetics

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jtrain_36 View Post
                              Those were some incredible pictures to go along with a pretty darn good accomplishment. Thanks for posting that, I've been able to workout in a fasted state but nothing to that extent. I guess we all still have goals to shoot for, huh?
                              That's the real metabolic advantage right there. And it's not that far-fetched. Once I got myself ketoadapted I had unlimited slow-burn energy. I was able to backpack all day in the snow without getting tired or needing to stop and eat. I did stop and eat but I could have just kept on going. I ended up eating very little.

                              People always have this confusion that the metabolic advantage of being ketoadapted is the same thing as "eat as much as you want as long as it's low carb." That's not the same thing at all, not even remotely. Being ketoadapted means you can eat nothing at all if you want to and still do everything you want to do with unflagging energy and a great big smile on your face. If people want to feed their food addictions and use low carb as an excuse to eat as much as they want, that's their deal. But that's not what the metabolic advantage of a low carb diet is all about. It's about being ketoadapted and metabolic flexibility, the ability to use either body fat or food energy as needed.
                              Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X