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  • Newbie question on supplements?

    I've been eating mostly Primal for about 3 weeks, as I have about 10 pounds to lose but most of all I want to make a lifestyle change and improve my health. I was reading about Mark's take on supplements, and I've decided that I want to start taking an Omega-3 supplement. I really do not know anything about supplements. Could anyone give me some advice as to what brands are good? Do I need to look for a certain amount of Omega-3 in each capsule? Does it even matter what brand?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    If you prefer capsule, it does come in that form. But I know someone whose Naturopath suggested this brand:

    Finest Fish Oil Pharmax

    I like that it only takes a teaspoon and it doesn't bother me to take it in liquid, although other brands did. And this link is just the best pic I could find; I don't buy it from here. If you watch for discounts at your local natural stores, you can sometimes get 20% off. That seems to be the best time to buy, right?
    Last edited by spk; 04-27-2012, 10:56 AM.

    “you aren't what you eat - you are what you don't poop.” Wavy Gravy

    Today I am Fillyjonk. Tommorow I will be Snufkin.

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    • #3
      You're going to get a lot of mixed opinions about Omega 3s. Personally I am a definite believer in them. If you are looking to lose weight, take as many grams of O3 as you have percent of body fat you want to lose. Ie. if you're at 30 % body fat and want to get to 20%, take 10 grams of O3 a day. Every day. If you're not looking to loose as much, lower your intake. You may need to increase your daily depending on how insulin resistant you are, but O3 increases your insulin sensitivity as well. O3 also makes your cells more pliable and able to convert fats into energy. All good things. If you're looking to increase your muscle mass, add more O3 (up to 40 -50 grams a day) I read an article recently that O3 are anabolic. If you're looking to increase mental alertness, take O3. If you're prone to depression, O3... You get the idea.

      Depending on where you're from will depend of what brands are around. The best thing is to look at what's available then google it. I can suggest some good ones if you're in Canada but you may not be able to get the same kind down in the states or other places.

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      • #4
        I love the Source Naturals ArcticPure 1125 product. I take 2 per day, on eating days (not fasting days) and I combine that also with 2x 2mL doses of Green Pastures Fermented Cod Liver Oil. If I wasn't taking the CLO, I'd do 4 of the ArcticPure per eating day.

        I am not sure I agree with the whole overdoing it on Omega-3's. Too much is just as harmful as too little, and if you're properly following PB it IS very possible to throw off the O3:O6 ratio the *other* way if you inhale fish oil.

        There was a time I did the whole 10-12g fish oil per day thing, along with other supplements, to resolve a suspected blood clot. Be aware it will likely thin your blood at those doses, and if you're as unlucky as I am with that sort of thing you won't be able to leave the house without Kleenex in your pocket. I did find adding CoQ10 helped normalize the bleeding/clotting, so if you go the ultra high-dose route, consider that. In any case, I am much happier now at a more moderated dose, personally. I was glad to be able to reduce my dose when my clot issue resolved.
        5'6" Female, 29 Years Old, 260/195/120

        "Discipline is choosing between what you want NOW, and what you want MOST!"

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        • #5
          If you want something that has been tested by Consumer Labs and passed, something that is just as good a quality as many big brand fish oils out there but half or more than half the cost, go for Kirkland brand-$10 for 400 softgels. Take two about 5 or 6 days a week and you should be fine.

          Costco also sells a great wild Alaskan salmon oil that is Cold Pressed!! Wild Alaskan salmon is so clean, it does not need to be purified using "molecular distillation" It's costs considerably more than Kirkland fish oil, but for the quality, it is pretty darn cheap. This salmon oil is far and above the quality of any fish oil product on the market.

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          • #6
            I hate to say it but Consumer Labs is questionable. They take money from supplement companies and the P in the USP "vitamins" they "recommend" stands for Pharmacopeia -- artificial interpretations of natural ingredients.

            “you aren't what you eat - you are what you don't poop.” Wavy Gravy

            Today I am Fillyjonk. Tommorow I will be Snufkin.

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            • #7
              They are somewhat questionable, but who else are you going to rely on? I believe Kirkland has been tested by other labs. I have been using the stuff for years, along with many others that have done their research on fish oils. I think kirkland is just fine.

              You quote "vitamins" as if none of tehm really are vitamins. I understand what you are saying, we should all look at these things with a critical eye.
              Last edited by morganpmiller; 04-27-2012, 12:31 PM.

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              • #8
                I always view supplements for those who are sick, have medical condition/deficiency, or are trying to quickly repair or reverse their lifestyle.

                What other reason should those of us with healthy diets need anything extra? Seems like something our ancestors did not need and that seems to be a big theme around here.

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                • #9
                  Our ancestors didn't have to deal the low quality soil, the herbicides, pesticides, heavy metals, increased cortisol from endless traffic, smog, dirty water, work, poor quality meats (even grass fed because what they eat isn't as good either) radio waves, microwaves, electric towers, BPA's.... Need I go on?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by morganpmiller View Post
                    They are somewhat questionable, but who else are you going to rely on? I believe Kirkland has been tested by other labs. I have been using the stuff for years, along with many others that have done their research on fish oils. I think kirkland is just fine.

                    You quote "vitamins" as if none of tehm really are vitamins. I understand what you are saying, we should all look at these things with a critical eye.
                    Certainly agree; who are we to rely on for info. And if it works for you, all the better. After many visits to ConsumerLabs, it started to appear that their focus was narrow and that seemed ... odd. There are some articles out there that point to more specific profit-focused behavior by them, that left me feeling I should not use them as the end-all-be-all of supplement review.

                    But who to trust? My gut? It can be tough to know!

                    “you aren't what you eat - you are what you don't poop.” Wavy Gravy

                    Today I am Fillyjonk. Tommorow I will be Snufkin.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Iron Will View Post
                      Our ancestors didn't have to deal the low quality soil, the herbicides, pesticides, heavy metals, increased cortisol from endless traffic, smog, dirty water, work, poor quality meats (even grass fed because what they eat isn't as good either) radio waves, microwaves, electric towers, BPA's.... Need I go on?
                      Point taken but that also works in reverse.. we have access to almost any food you could want to make up for this. Do you think our ancestors could have meat 3 meals a day? Near any veg on demand? Could they view nutritional data of foods and plan accordingly to get the most out of their combined foods? I find it hard to believe our ancestors had it easier than us and now we must take supplements. Our nutritional potential has to be far beyond anything our ancestors had. Of course I am not saying our ancestors had it perfect. Don't get me wrong I can see taking them to fill some cracks or just have your bases covered.. but at the same time I think it is often a money grab by companies trying to convince people they need them more than necessary on a healthy diet. For example, you need more vitamin E.. use the internet and eat more foods with vite.

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                      • #12
                        We (paleo we) evolved to eat the foods that were available to us during that time and our bodies evolved to process the nutrients in said foods. Those ratios are very difficult to find now. Even in the best foods that are available us. Yes i definitely agree that there is the money grab so research should definitely be done before any supplementation.

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