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Scrambled eggs bad?

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  • Scrambled eggs bad?

    I read something by someone on another site that says scrambled eggs are bad because the yolk oxidizes or what not. So it basically makes the cholesterol in the eggs bad.


    Now today I had 6 eggs scrambled. Just today though. SO is that bad or just some random comment by some user?

    I mean if it is then I won't have scrambled eggs.

  • #2
    I read something similar about scrambling messes up the fat in the yolk but I am not sure how true it is and if so how severe the scrambling makes a difference.

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    • #3
      This is not true and has been debunked by Fallon. There is a website somewhere with her response, but the only way the yolk can oxidize is through a high powered machine.

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      • #4
        If you overcook scrambled eggs, you are beginning to enter the area of diminishing returns. I try to cook all food at as low a temperature as possible, so as to cook to my liking, and preserve integrity as much as possible. I like my meat med rare to rare, and my eggs firm but moist.

        If you were to scramble eggs for ten mins, then let them sit out for a little too long, you probably do start to risk oxidizig cholesterol.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by rkd80 View Post
          This is not true and has been debunked by Fallon. There is a website somewhere with her response, but the only way the yolk can oxidize is through a high powered machine.
          Now I remember.. it was a youtube video and the person put eggs in his morning shake. He put the eggs in last and did a light pulse blend so the yolk did not get blended real heavy. That is probably what you mean by high powered machine?

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          • #6
            I think they meant something like an industrial dehydrator.
            Last edited by magicmerl; 04-26-2012, 03:15 PM.
            Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

            Griff's cholesterol primer
            5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
            Winterbike: What I eat every day is what other people eat to treat themselves.
            TQP: I find for me that nutrition is much more important than what I do in the gym.
            bloodorchid is always right

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            • #7
              It's all relative. More lightly-cooked foods will generally have less oxidized fats/cholesterol - but at some point it becomes noise-level/practically inconsequential.

              *real* Scrambled eggs that aren't burnt to a crisp are probably fairly modest in terms of oxidized fat/cholesterol content. However, reconstituted powdered eggs(think of the stuff they pass off as "scrambled eggs" at some cheap breakfast buffet) have been found to have a very high fraction of oxidized cholesterol - the industrial spray drying process isn't particularly gentle.

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              • #8
                Well, I cook my eggs on high but for about 20 seconds. With meats I like when they are well done.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Dailytribal View Post
                  Well, I cook my eggs on high but for about 20 seconds. With meats I like when they are well done.
                  I still haven't figured out whether it's best to cook at a high heat or lower heat and still reach the same level of cooking. I thin high heat carries more risk of damage. Also, well done meat will have more AGE's and will comme with more risk of oxidation of fats. Adding to the accumulation of AGE's that is already taking place is something we want to try to reduce as much as possible.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by morganpmiller View Post
                    I still haven't figured out whether it's best to cook at a high heat or lower heat and still reach the same level of cooking. I thin high heat carries more risk of damage. Also, well done meat will have more AGE's and will comme with more risk of oxidation of fats. Adding to the accumulation of AGE's that is already taking place is something we want to try to reduce as much as possible.
                    +1.
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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Dailytribal View Post
                      SO is that bad or just some random comment by some user?
                      ...are we not random users?
                      Female, age 51, 5' 9"
                      SW - 183 (Jan 22, 2012), CW - 159, GW - healthy.

                      Met my 2012 goals by losing 24 pounds.
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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by morganpmiller View Post
                        I still haven't figured out whether it's best to cook at a high heat or lower heat and still reach the same level of cooking. I thin high heat carries more risk of damage. Also, well done meat will have more AGE's and will comme with more risk of oxidation of fats. Adding to the accumulation of AGE's that is already taking place is something we want to try to reduce as much as possible.
                        Well whatever. I was reading other comments talking about how people cooking over fires most likely burnt their food a long time ago. Dunno what effects that caused people from back then.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Dailytribal View Post
                          Well whatever. I was reading other comments talking about how people cooking over fires most likely burnt their food a long time ago. Dunno what effects that caused people from back then.
                          There is plenty of evidence suggesting overcooking food and fats having a link with cancer and other health issues.

                          Hey, I was just sayin. If you can grow to appreciate the taste of a quality med rare steak, you will likely benefit. If not, then you might be able to do other things to help reduce the negative impact.

                          I just happen to be like Mark and others. I want to live as long a healthy high functioning life as possible. So, eating as healthy as possible, with a little cheating here and there, is something I would like to maintain. Everything I eat, whether raw or mildy cooked, tastes delicious to me, so I am certainly not sacrificing pleasing my palate.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by tresa
                            Its only bad if you forget to put cheese in them.
                            Haha..nice

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                            • #15
                              Anytime heat is put to any food it causes oxidation. That's what cooking does to food. Mild heat of otherwise. That's why the outside of your steak turns brown, or why your green vegetables turn a darker green. If your diet is so perfect that you're conserned about oxidation of your scrambled eggs, well I just don't know what to say. If you want to take away 98% of the oxidation, don't cook anything. Period. Otherwise, don't sweat the small stuff. Cooking your scrambled eggs is not going to kill you. The stress of worrying about if you should cook them over mild heat or high heat will kill you first.

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