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Grass fed steak from WF,, not impressed

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  • Grass fed steak from WF,, not impressed

    So I went to whole foods and splurged on a grass-fed rib eye. That sucker was 18 bucks, but I decided to treat myself. I cooked it rare on a really hot grill. But due to the lack of fat I was not impressed with the taste and the steak was rather chewy as if I was eating some cheap cut. I guess there is a reason why some best tasting steaks I've had were corn fed or "corn finished". Whole food's grass-fed ground beef on the other hand is very good and much more affordable. Some of the best burger's I've made at home.
    Last edited by lardomuncher; 04-24-2012, 04:40 PM.

  • #2
    I tend to like my ribeyes cooked a little more closer to medium, especially the grass fed ones. You will get a little more of that melted fat taste. I would try that and eat your NY Strips and filets more rare.

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    • #3
      Try the ground buffalo.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by lardomuncher View Post
        So I went to whole foods and splurged on a grass-fed rib eye. That sucker was 18 bucks, but I decided to treat myself. I cooked it rare on a really hot grill. But due to the lack of fat I was not impressed with the taste and the steak was rather chewy as if I was eating some cheap cut. I guess there is a reason why some best tasting steaks I've had were corn fed or "corn finished". Whole food's grass-fed ground beef on the other hand is very good and much more affordable. Some of the best burger's I've made at home.
        Very easily could be your supplier....not even all grass fed cow is created equal. Heck I've eaten mine raw before. Stuff was tender and tasted great!...The other way is black and blue.

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        • #5
          You don't cook grass-fed the way you do conventional meat. You cook it on lower heat for more time.

          Could be their farmer. Everyone does it differently.
          A Post-Primal PrimalPat

          Do not allow yourself to become wrapped up in a food 'lifestyle'. That is ego, and you are not that.

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          • #6
            This is the best way to cook it. Try this next time.
            Tiny Urban Kitchen: Oven to Pan Seared Prime Ribeye Steaks

            Basically you need to bake it at a very low temperature. Then you sear it to lock in the juices and then you let it rest.

            This slow baking at a low temperature allows enzymes in the meat (cathepsins) to break down connective fibers, making the meat super tender. It's sort of like dry aging at turbo speeds in the oven. This enzyme only works at temperatures below 140 degrees, which is why hot broiling the steaks for a short amount of time does not cause this tenderizing effect. In our case, we have slowly baked and "aged" the steak in the oven under low heat for 15 minutes (or longer, if you like medium steaks!)
            I did this with a steak that was over 1lb in size so it took significantly longer than 15 minutes. I used an oven probe so that the temperature would be precise. It turned out so good my boyfriend said "This is one hell of a steak. I think this is the best steak I've ever had."
            Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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            • #7
              A good piece of grassfed steak should be mostly very tender and easy to chew. It is possible you simply got 1 out of 20 bad cuts. I've loved every grassfed steak I've made at home, including the rjbeyes.

              It is true that grassfed and corn finished may have a bit more flavor.

              I also cook my steaks at a lower temp than most, but not to loosen the fibers. I do this simply because it's healthier. My steaks are always medium rare-to me medium is just overcooked steak.

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              • #8
                Just to point out, searing a steak does not "lock in the juices". The only reason you sear a steak is to create a crust. I always cook grassfed beef less time. I always go high heat for short period they always come out tasty. Bill Curtis (Tallgrass Beef Company - Home of America's Finest Grass-Fed Beef!) has some tasty steaks and by far the tastiest hamburger (I am talking nothing even comes close). One of his burgers on a flattop topped with some goat cheese... forgetaboutit.
                Last edited by Fernaldo; 04-24-2012, 07:22 PM.
                "The problem with quoting someone on the Internet is, you never know if it's legit" - Abraham Lincoln

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                • #9
                  Just saying "grassfed" is no guide to the flavor or texture of the meat. Read this: Beef and Beer: Can we de-commodify grassfed meat? | Melissa McEwen's on food anthropology, economics, and culture
                  Look for a high end steak from Argentina (or even Australia) next time you want a nice cut of meat - even if it's not certified grass fed, it most certainly will be, as that is the preferred AND cost effective way to do it there, and actually, in most of the world. The US stuff - we are still learning how to do it, and it's pretty hit and miss. With my own farmer, the lamb and pork are among the tastiest I've ever had, but the beef really depends on the cut. Some of it is pretty dry and tough.
                  If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

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                  • #10
                    Not a fan of Whole Foods' grass fed that I've had. Just not as good as the stuff at the farmer's market, and frequently equal in price or more expensive.

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                    • #11
                      I actually had a similar experience with the grass fed beef from Raley's. All the fat was completely trimmed off and once they were cooked, they were extremely tough and flavorless.

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                      • #12
                        I think the steaks at WF are too expensive also. However, our WF has excellent grass fed short ribs that are cheaper. We usually buy the short ribs and beef shanks and make a big beef stew out of it. We separate the bones and make a broth afterwards. That's how you stretch your grass fed beef dollar at WF.

                        I buy my steaks from my local farmer, almost half of WF price. Re grass fed toughness, it's hit and miss, but I found that true with conventional steaks as well. Maybe one out of four are tough. My farmer doesn't like to admit that some are tough, so I'll just ask him, "hey what steaks are good this week" and he'll "steer" (gosh I'm funny) me in the right direction. If one ends up being a little tough, we'll just freeze and save it for the next stew.

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