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Opting out of Health Care, Primally.

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  • #16
    1



    I go to the doctor once a year for a physical and a pap. I don't see why I would stop doing that. Cancer is scary and there's no reason to not have testing done yearly.

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    • #17
      1



      Well put, piano-doctor-lady. You said:


      "When doctors make mistakes, they make BAD mistakes!"


      This cannot be emphasized enough.

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      • #18
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        @gini


        I can think of some reasons, but also some other reasons to do things your way.


        My mother kept nagging me to get a mammogram. I never did, I outright refused. One day my sister (who had full medical through Hewlett Packard) had a mammogram which revealed a little tiny lump, very small, but in a bad place, down near the chest wall. She had a little in-office surgery, local anesthetic, to take out a little cherry-sized part of her breast including the tiny lump, so it could be analyzed. It was analyzed, and it was benign. My mother then said, "Well, now your sister will understand why she MUST get a mammogram!" But my sister answered, "no I think she'll understand why she truly doesn't want a mammogram." The cost of this procedure was about 7,000 dollars, which in her place I would have had to pay out of pocket. Plus there was the anxiety, plus though she said that the people were very concerned and sympathetic, the procedure itself was really an ordeal.


        To sum up -- false negatives, false positives, unnecessary follow-ups, anxiety and expense, and just possibly the wrong treatment.


        On the other hand, just possibly one of those exams might help you.


        I think everybody has to judge the odds for themselves.

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        • #19
          1



          I have to disagree with some of what is being said. I am a GI endoscopy nurse and spend much of my day doing colonoscopies. We often remove polyps which, if left alone for several more years, would develop into cancers. Too many times I have had patients who have not come in for a routine screening at age 50, then ten years later they have bleeding, come in for a colonoscopy, and we find cancer. Our team has found a number of cancers in healthy asymptomatic people in their early 50s; having a colonoscopy surely saved their lives, as their cancers were found early enough that a colon resection surgery was all they needed (no chemo or radiation). We find polyps in about a third of our patients - one snip with a forceps and it's gone forever. Colon cancer is lifestyle related for sure, but there is a strong genetic componant, and we have found cancer and pre-cancers in lots of healthy, lean people with no family history. The prep for the colonoscopy sucks and dealing with the prep and the procedure will cost you two days, but it's a hell of a lot easier than being treated for cancer.

          My blog: Pretty Good Paleo
          On Twitter: @NEKLocalvore

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          • #20
            1



            Annika; we've all gotta die of something. I'm not saying I might not smack myself in the head if I ever got colon cancer, but with my diseaseless family history and exemplary health habits, I'm playing the odds.


            Piano-doctor-lady, I have a story similar to yours. A friend was in a panic when they saw something on her mammogram, and she was in mental anguish for about two months before they went in and took out a huge chunk of tissue, including muscle, which turned out to be nothing. She had trouble lifting her arm a year later, and about $10,000 in unpaid doctor bills, and stress and trauma that will last her entire life and probably shorten it by a couple of years. Three cheers for diagnostic testing, huh?

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            • #21
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              Annika - This is exactly the reason why I keep coverage. I had a cancerous cervical growth at age 23 that was detected in a routine pap which I had put off for over a year.


              Sure, you may feel healthy and have amazing bloodwork, but it's those little things that can creep up undetected.

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              • #22
                1



                I have not had health insurance in over a decade, and not by choice. As soon as I have a job with benefits or am making enough money to get coverage on my own, I will definitely have a plan and get regular check-ups. Just because you make an annual trip to the doctor's office does not automatically mean that you have to start taking oodles of prescription meds.


                While eating right is enormously beneficial towards the body, it is by no means a universal panacea. I personally will be taking full advantage of all that modern medical technology has to offer for disease prevention and detection. As for treatment, I will research my options thoroughly should the situation arise.


                I mean no disrespect to anyone, but sometimes the anti-CW rhetoric on these boards starts to turn into anti-science propaganda.


                Greg B, I was under the impression that any money put into HSAs had to be used by the end of the year for medical expenses or it would be lost. Do you know anything about this?

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                • #23
                  1



                  I don't have health insurance, and I don't want it. An HSA (health savings account) would be nice though. Really I only need catastrophic coverage, like if I get cancer or something. Otherwise I pay my eye doctor, dentist and lady doctor out of pocket. It makes life so much easier.


                  Shine- HSA's grow tax free, so any money you put in and don't use, you can take out after you retire.

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                  • #24
                    1



                    Diana, thanks for the clarification. I can't remember where I had heard that the money did not roll over to the next year, but it turned me off from the whole idea. I think that I will look back into it now.

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                    • #25
                      1



                      High deductible coverage is no fabulous thing either. I have it, and the premium is still high for someone poor. I can't afford to use the coverage because it's all out of pocket, and any money I had to put towards that, has already gone to the premium.

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                      • #26
                        1



                        I'm glad we have health insurance, especially in case of accidents. Way back in the early 1990's I broke one of my ankles while hiking. It had to be surgically set in three places. I was just out of college and had no savings. I know it cost about $10K then, I can't imagine what it would cost now. And now that there's 4 of us in the family, if we should all get hurt in an auto accident...well I don't even want to think of what that might cost. I'm glad for the backup.

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                        • #27
                          1



                          We don't have health insurance. Catastrophic healthcare is affordable when you are young, but ridiculous when you turn 50 and beyond. We're into holistic health, plus we found an allopathic doc who doesn't take insurance, is reasonably priced, and works with us. We are rarely sick. I broke my foot last year, and our total cost was $250. This way of life isn't for everyone, but we like being free of the system.

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                          • #28
                            1



                            I'm not trying to hijack this thread or start another topic, but I have to say from reading some of these posts, that fear is a powerful motivator. Fear is overused these days in many areas, including illness/health. I've read that cancers can come and go - on their own, and that a cancerous tumor's lifespan without treatment is three years - if your body's immune system is good enough to keep it from killing you and that some people may have had it at one time, and not even have known it. Is that true? I don't know. But perhaps it's not always a death sentence, or costs hundreds of thousands of dollars to treat. But that's not a widely held or popular theory, especially because it would probably put some folks out of business.

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                            • #29
                              1



                              Great posts, and I agree 110% that nobody living primally should ever have to see a western doctor.


                              However, you could never make the argument that "primitive" man never had medicine. Man, until recent times, has always had a profound knowledge of the plant based medicinal resources in his environment. The had very sophisticated techniques, too. Native Americans were known to make injectable hollow needles out of bone, and drip bags out of intestines. They would literally main-line herbal decoctions in acute illnesses.


                              I am an oriental medical doctor (acupuncturist/herbalist). Whether you believe any of that works or not, I tell you, the things I can treat with this natural, plant-based medicine, is amazing. (and it's cheap) I would go see a trained herbalist before I would EVER go to an MD. Just my opinion, but I would never risk my health, or waste my money.

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                              • #30
                                1



                                "I mean no disrespect to anyone, but sometimes the anti-CW rhetoric on these boards starts to turn into anti-science propaganda."


                                Shine, I know exactly what you mean. But my aversion to doctors isn't anti-CW or anti-science. It's more of a philosophy of:


                                1. An acceptance of the human condition.


                                2. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

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