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  • Brown or White Sugar? Or does it matter?

    I know Mark recommends white rice when ever we elect to consume rice, because the processed rice has the stem thingie that is bad for you removed.

    But what about sugar? If I want to have a little bit of sugar in my coffee every day, should I go with brown organic, or processed white?

    Thanks.

    Hans.

  • #2
    Where sugars are concerned the LEAST processed is better IMO... turbinado/demerara/muscavado, molasses, real maple syrup, honey.

    "brown sugar" is just refined white sugar with molasses added to it.
    “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
    ~Friedrich Nietzsche
    And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.

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    • #3
      brown and white sugar are the same crap.

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      • #4
        Brown sugar is whole grain, lower in calories and gives you a much more pleasing sugar crash. It's helpful for weight management as well.

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        • #5
          haha. What timthetaco said!

          Sugar is sugar. Use it very sparingly.

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          • #6
            Hmm you know I've always loved brown sugar way more then white sugar.. after this I think I need to buy some molasses.
            Primal since March 2011

            Female/29 years old/5' 1"/130ish lbs

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            • #7
              I agree that when it comes to sugar, unlike grains, the least processed the better.
              The difference has to do with the fact that with grains (rice), the outer coating contains anti-nutrients to protect it from being eaten by animals or insects. That outer coating is also made of indigestible fiber and can cause problems in the intestinal tract, such as binding to nutrients rendering them completely unavailable. Grains that don't have an 'outer covering' like rice (corn, quinoa, etc) must be prepared or 'predigested' to make them safer to eat. There is a great book called 'Nourishing Traditions' by Sally Fallon that has more detailed info on this if you're interested.

              Sugar is a different thing all together, because sugar is essentially the juice that is extracted from pressing the fibrous insides of the sugar cane. The outer coating (the cane) and the fiber has been elimininated. This sugar liquid contains both glucose (the white 'sweet' part of sugar) and a TON of minerals and nutrients. Either they separate these nutrients and sell them as molasses and sell the glucose part as white sugar, or everything is kept intact as a raw, whole brown unprocessed sugar teeming with both sweetness and minerals like iron, potassium, etc...

              The trouble with most 'brown' sugars is that the sugar is superprocessed. The 'molasses' part of the sugar is extracted and then a small part of it is added back to the white glucose to create what we know as 'brown sugar'. Another major problem with 'table sugar' in my opinion is that it's all GMO and likely not derived solely from sugar cane anymore, but from corn products (not to be confused with high fructose corn syrup).

              In conclusion, if you are going to use some sugar (which I think is perfectly fine, and not a devil by any means when taken in small doses), I'd go for organic sugar (to ensure that it's not GMO) and for one that's the least processed and in it's 'whole' state.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by jakey View Post
                brown and white sugar are the same crap.
                This ....I sweeten my coffee with raw honey. If you drop a teaspoon of sugar in your coffee each day a bit of crap is probably OK though Make it part of your 20% if your rolling like that.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by BestBetter View Post
                  I agree that when it comes to sugar, unlike grains, the least processed the better.
                  The difference has to do with the fact that with grains (rice), the outer coating contains anti-nutrients to protect it from being eaten by animals or insects. That outer coating is also made of indigestible fiber and can cause problems in the intestinal tract, such as binding to nutrients rendering them completely unavailable. Grains that don't have an 'outer covering' like rice (corn, quinoa, etc) must be prepared or 'predigested' to make them safer to eat. There is a great book called 'Nourishing Traditions' by Sally Fallon that has more detailed info on this if you're interested.

                  Sugar is a different thing all together, because sugar is essentially the juice that is extracted from pressing the fibrous insides of the sugar cane. The outer coating (the cane) and the fiber has been elimininated. This sugar liquid contains both glucose (the white 'sweet' part of sugar) and a TON of minerals and nutrients. Either they separate these nutrients and sell them as molasses and sell the glucose part as white sugar, or everything is kept intact as a raw, whole brown unprocessed sugar teeming with both sweetness and minerals like iron, potassium, etc...

                  The trouble with most 'brown' sugars is that the sugar is superprocessed. The 'molasses' part of the sugar is extracted and then a small part of it is added back to the white glucose to create what we know as 'brown sugar'. Another major problem with 'table sugar' in my opinion is that it's all GMO and likely not derived solely from sugar cane anymore, but from corn products (not to be confused with high fructose corn syrup).

                  In conclusion, if you are going to use some sugar (which I think is perfectly fine, and not a devil by any means when taken in small doses), I'd go for organic sugar (to ensure that it's not GMO) and for one that's the least processed and in it's 'whole' state.
                  The sugar in cane sugar is sucrose, not glucose. Sucrose is disaccharide consisting of a glucose and a fructose molecule bound together, so it's 50:50. It's fructose that's harmful in quantity when quickly absorbed.

                  That's why starch (with the toxins eliminated) is considered a much healthier source of carbs than sucrose or fructose, when consumed in the right context.

                  Agreed, molasses is the most micronutrient-dense form of sugar so it's a good choice, eaten in moderation.
                  F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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                  • #10
                    Yes, you're right. I keep switching glucose and sucrose for some reason. Thanks for the correction!

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                    • #11
                      Blackstrap molasses
                      Coconut sugar
                      Sucanat
                      Raw honey
                      Maple syrup

                      Those are real, whole sugars. If you buy sucanat, make sure it's real sucanat. Some brands remove the molasses, then add it back in. A popular kind is Rapadura because it's true sucanat. I don't use much sugar at all, but would prefer coconut sugar, with some raw honey or maple syrup where the flavor is appropriate. Blackstrap molasses is king - it's extremely nutrient dense for a sweetener and beats most grains and some whole foods in terms of nutrient density per calorie. It's a very strong, unique flavor that isn't very sweet though, so applications are unfortunately limited.
                      Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by harambur View Post
                        I know Mark recommends white rice when ever we elect to consume rice, because the processed rice has the stem thingie that is bad for you removed.

                        But what about sugar? If I want to have a little bit of sugar in my coffee every day, should I go with brown organic, or processed white?
                        I prefer mine straight off the sugar cane...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by cori93437 View Post
                          Where sugars are concerned the LEAST processed is better IMO... turbinado/demerara/muscavado, molasses, real maple syrup, honey.

                          "brown sugar" is just refined white sugar with molasses added to it.
                          Um isn't cane sugar that is not processed brown?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by harambur View Post
                            I know Mark recommends white rice when ever we elect to consume rice, because the processed rice has the stem thingie that is bad for you removed.

                            But what about sugar? If I want to have a little bit of sugar in my coffee every day, should I go with brown organic, or processed white?

                            Thanks.

                            Hans.
                            um I thought brown rice was great

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Dailytribal View Post
                              Um isn't cane sugar that is not processed brown?
                              Sort of... but it is not called "brown sugar" and it's not soft and sticky like "brown sugar"... that's why I put "brown sugar" in quotes there... it's actually the name of the product that is created from white refined sugar that has some molasses added back to it.

                              Dried natural cane sugars which are a brown color are demerara/turbinado/muscavado/panela/rapadura/sucanat (etc.. there are tons of cultural/regional names for slightly different products). There are slight flavor difference in each of those. Sucanat/muscavado and panela/rapadura are probably the most mineral retentive being naturally darker. They are all dry sugars, with the exception of the panela/rapadura which is a hard block, much like the white refined sugars but typically with larger crystal size. These products have differing levels of brown-ness, and are not refined... the juice is simply pressed, heated and dried so that it retains all of the natural minerals.

                              Certainly not the same as commercial "brown sugar".
                              “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
                              ~Friedrich Nietzsche
                              And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.

                              Comment

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