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Greek Yogurt and Whey-More is Better?

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  • Greek Yogurt and Whey-More is Better?

    I'm trying to get better versions of dairy into my fridge and support local businesses too. Always enjoyed my full-fat Greek yogurt but it's a commercial brand.

    So I'm reading on a local producers site and they say:

    "We offer a thin, loose set whole-milk yogurt and a thick Greek yogurt. Our Greek yogurt is the same whole milk product, but has been strained to remove most of the whey."

    Now I may be slow this evening but wouldn't I want the un-strained version to gain the benefits of the whey? Provided I don't have a problem w/ whey/casein? Maybe I'm missing a piece of this puzzle re: whey.

    “you aren't what you eat - you are what you don't poop.” Wavy Gravy

    Today I am Fillyjonk. Tommorow I will be Snufkin.

  • #2
    Little Miss Muffet
    Sat on a tuffet,
    Eating her curds and whey.
    Along came a spider
    Who sat down beside her,
    And frightened Miss Muffet away.

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    • #3
      And I thought humor was dead....!

      “you aren't what you eat - you are what you don't poop.” Wavy Gravy

      Today I am Fillyjonk. Tommorow I will be Snufkin.

      Comment


      • #4
        I prefer the very thick greek style yoghurt. I find its rich creaminess very satisfying in a way that the thin yoghurt just can't match. I also sometimes strain it further into a soft cheese, mix that with garlic, spices, and herbs... SO good!

        I make my own and therefore also get to keep the whey to use as I wish. You could do the same I suppose... get the thin yoghurt and strain it so that you can also use the fermented whey for other things, but expect to lose about 1/3 of the volume goign from thin to thick, half or more from thin to soft cheese. I use some reserved fermented whey in homemade Mayo, some in homemade salad dressings... some gets fed to the dogs to be honest.

        I think you'd be best off just going with the yoghurt you prefer the TASTE/mouth feel of though if you aren't interested in making those changes yourself.
        “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
        ~Friedrich Nietzsche
        And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.

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        • #5
          Thanks so much cori93437 -- because I too prefer the richer style, Greek version. And we used to make yogurt when I was growing up and have thought about restarting it so your details really are appreciated. Especially the thought of reusing fermented whey for homemade Mayo.

          “you aren't what you eat - you are what you don't poop.” Wavy Gravy

          Today I am Fillyjonk. Tommorow I will be Snufkin.

          Comment


          • #6
            I have a semi-related question that maybe you, Cori, could answer:

            I just made some butter from cream that I "inoculated" with yogurt. I kept the buttermilk. The buttermilk from the first batch I made a few weeks ago seems to have gone bad. Is there any way to preserve it? Does it freeze? Does it contain whey that I can extract somehow?

            Thanks in advance.

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            • #7
              I thought Greek yoghurt was strained by definition? As in yoghurt ---> greek yoghurt + whey?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by spk View Post
                Thanks so much cori93437 -- because I too prefer the richer style, Greek version. And we used to make yogurt when I was growing up and have thought about restarting it so your details really are appreciated. Especially the thought of reusing fermented whey for homemade Mayo.
                You can also use it to start fermented vegetables, like sauerkraut. Or just drink it!
                Best--
                Kate

                Still Craving Pterodactyl--my Primal Blueprint blog

                70 is the new 50--without the hot flashes!

                Goals: Feel good, be stronger, and hopefully kick that arthritis in the backside! Oh, yeah, and losing more weight would be okay, too.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Kate Ruckman View Post
                  You can also use it to start fermented vegetables, like sauerkraut. Or just drink it!
                  Right, I usually just drink it. I haven't tried to use it for fermenting. I've heard of using whey for that purpose but wasn't sure if buttermilk would work as well. Thanks!

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                  • #10
                    Hmmm... other than using the whey as a liquid for lots of things... the only other use I'm aware of is to try and make ricotta.
                    It won't be sweet like regular ricotta as it is from the fermented whey...

                    Basically just boil the whey being careful not to let it boil over... you'll see a white "scum" form. As the whey cools stir it to encourage the solids to fall to the bottom. Strain it through something very fine like a reusable gold mesh coffee filter basket. You'll not get a lot of ricotta this way... maybe a quarter-half cup.

                    Yes, you can freeze the liquid whey as it is, but freezing IMO defeats the purpose of having the fermented whey. It's just not going to be active after freezing like it was before.
                    “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
                    ~Friedrich Nietzsche
                    And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by cori93437 View Post
                      Hmmm... other than using the whey as a liquid for lots of things... the only other use I'm aware of is to try and make ricotta.
                      It won't be sweet like regular ricotta as it is from the fermented whey...

                      Basically just boil the whey being careful not to let it boil over... you'll see a white "scum" form. As the whey cools stir it to encourage the solids to fall to the bottom. Strain it through something very fine like a reusable gold mesh coffee filter basket. You'll not get a lot of ricotta this way... maybe a quarter-half cup.

                      Yes, you can freeze the liquid whey as it is, but freezing IMO defeats the purpose of having the fermented whey. It's just not going to be active after freezing like it was before.
                      Right, but what I have is buttermilk, which I'm pretty sure is different from whey. Does all that still apply?

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                      • #12
                        If you are looking for the most nutritious yogurt, greek is not the whey to go People eat greek because they are not willing to acquire the taste they should have long ago to more traditional yogurts eaten by our not so distant ancestors.

                        The two best and healthiest yogurts out there that I know of, that come closest to getting raw wholemilk yogurt, are Erivan and Hawthorne Valley. I love the both and alternate when I desire. I do however eat greek when I crave a rich creamy change. The only problem is greek is harder on digestion. Straining causes the loss of things that would enhance digestion, including probiotics and enzymes. The best tasting and healthiest greek yogurt out there is Wallaby. This greek yogurt is made from pastere fed cows from California. The only knock on these guys is that they only offer a 2% version-at least I don't think there is a full fat one.

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