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  • Weight =/= health

    I've been gone awhile, but I'm a little shocked at what I'm seeing all over the boards - this idea that you can judge someone's health on their weight alone. Weight is only one marker of health, & while I agree it's nearly impossible to be healthy when you're obese, it's also easy to be unhealthy when one's BMI is in the correct range.

    The whole idea of the Primal Blueprint is to achieve optimum health, through ten different aspects of life. I know a lot of people come to primal/paleo because of weight issues, but there's so much more to it! Why is everyone boiling health down to weight alone?
    And forget not that the earth delights to feel your bare feet and the wind longs to play with your hair
    Kahlil Gibran

    http://simplesunshine.wordpress.com

  • #2
    I'm underweight due to some mistakes I made a few years ago. The board automatically assumes I'm a skinny fat anorexic. Eh, most people on here are just learning paleo, don't pay attention to them.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by aboutsaffron View Post
      I've Weight is only one marker of health
      +1

      Originally posted by aboutsaffron View Post
      The whole idea of the Primal Blueprint is to achieve optimum health
      +2
      The Champagne of Beards

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      • #4
        Fierce... I think people think you are anorexic notsomuch because of your size or even your diet- but things like saying you are uncomfortable being around fat people like Kim Kardashian. You have some pretty strange views that don't equal the viewpoint of a normal slender person with a healthy body image.

        Anyhow, I agree- it does seem like a lot of posts are about weight loss (and sometimes I think in the name of weightloss people skew to some unhealthy eating patterns). However, a lot of other people seem to focus on other aspects. I think everyone realizes that Primal is good for overall health and wellness, even if they came to the lifestyle to lose weight. The weight loss kind of sucks you in, the improved health keeps you around.

        I also think weight is the easiest marker of health to see- and here it does seem like much of the success is more based on body appearance- lean with muscles vs. numbers dropping. It's hard to illustrate changes in say, energy and not everyone has access to lab tests etc.

        http://maggiesfeast.wordpress.com/
        Check out my blog. Hope to share lots of great recipes and ideas!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by magnolia1973 View Post
          Fierce... You have some pretty strange views that don't equal the viewpoint of a normal slender person with a healthy body image.
          +300.

          OP, i think that while weight does not equal health, being overweight almost always indicates a health problem. it's the inverse, however, that's not true - being at a 'healthy' weight or 'normal' BMI does not equal good health.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by aboutsaffron View Post
            Why is everyone boiling health down to weight alone?
            Why does everyone always exaggerate

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            • #7
              I agree with you, aboutsaffron.

              PB does not recommend low-calorie dieting - the intention is to promote optimal health and energy levels, so that excess fat will drop off slowly and naturally, without the suppression in BMR that low-calorie dieting is famous for causing. It's a plan aimed at helping people get stronger and healthier, for life.
              F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by paleo-bunny View Post
                I agree with you, aboutsaffron.

                PB does not recommend low-calorie dieting - the intention is to promote optimal health and energy levels, so that excess fat will drop off slowly and naturally, without the suppression in BMR that low-calorie dieting is famous for causing. It's a plan aimed at helping people get stronger and healthier, for life.
                well, there is a weightloss chapter which says you need to be in caloric deficit. it doesn't reconcile perfectly with the carb curve, either. a lovely contradiction, but at least mark recognizes that calories count for weightloss.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by jakey View Post
                  well, there is a weightloss chapter which says you need to be in caloric deficit. it doesn't reconcile perfectly with the carb curve, either. a lovely contradiction, but at least mark recognizes that calories count for weightloss.
                  Yes he admits that calories count. That's not the same as recommending low-calorie, rapid-weightloss dieting.
                  F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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                  • #10
                    I shouldn't comment but we all know fat is the norm in the States. I'm not so much uncomfortable but fed up with the blatant ignorance.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jakey View Post
                      +300.

                      OP, i think that while weight does not equal health, being overweight almost always indicates a health problem. it's the inverse, however, that's not true - being at a 'healthy' weight or 'normal' BMI does not equal good health.
                      Actually, you can't guess whether someone who is overweight is healthy just by looking at them. Lots of people have a BMI over 25 and still have good markers of health otherwise--in fact, people who are slightly overweight have better health outcomes than people who are underweight. Obesity (BMI >30) is more often accompanied by other health conditions, but even then, there's a percentage of the population who have no co-morbidities with obesity.

                      You cannot look at a person's body size alone and assume anything about their health status.
                      “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

                      Owly's Journal

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Owly View Post
                        Actually, you can't guess whether someone who is overweight is healthy just by looking at them. Lots of people have a BMI over 25 and still have good markers of health otherwise--in fact, people who are slightly overweight have better health outcomes than people who are underweight. Obesity (BMI >30) is more often accompanied by other health conditions, but even then, there's a percentage of the population who have no co-morbidities with obesity.

                        You cannot look at a person's body size alone and assume anything about their health status.
                        What is the purpose of this? Seriously. Many people smoke who have good markers of health otherwise. I have a close friend who is a physician. Her test is whether or not the first thing to come through the doorway is the belly, if it is, she’ll run other tests. 99% have pre-diabetic symptoms. Being overweight (let’s say obese, so there’s no confusion) IS A MARKER OF POOR HEALTH.

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                        • #13
                          I'm not so much uncomfortable but fed up with the blatant ignorance.
                          Yeah but in the US... people have f'ed up ideas of a healthy body image. Kim Kardashian is a "normal" weight person. She does not have a weight problem that would cause disease. For women over the age of 25- it is not going to be possible to look like say, Kate Middleton without very unhealthy dieting (unless you share their body type). For me to look like Kate Middleton... I'd need a breast reduction, massive loss of fat and I would need to remove muscle from my glutes and thighs and probably need to shave off hip bone. And the very low body fat athletes that look healthy often have reproductive issues.

                          You don't seem to accept that there are different body shapes and that some amount of fat on a woman serves a purpose related to reproduction.

                          Why this ends up being damaging.... women hear time and time again that celeb XYZ who is a size 8 with what, 22% body fat is a fricking heifer. OMG, she's gotten fat! Holy crap- bet her husband leaves. Then they look at themselves - a size 12 and start down a road of unhealthy eating habits that leave them malnourished.

                          There are a lot of very healthy women who post on this website who are larger and carry more fat than Kim Kardashian- but look amazing and are extremely healthy. They just have a body type that carries some fat- or one that puts on muscle. And I'm betting they are fitter and healthier than the size 2 supermodels. You can be really healthy and look like Kate Middleton, Kim Kardashian or Serena Williams.

                          And I don't think ANY of us who really are overweight are sitting around thinking we don't have weight to lose or that we have perfect health.... Truly- I'm not ignorant about the impact of my weight on my appearance or my health. I don't know of ANY overweight woman who thinks she is as healthy as possible.

                          http://maggiesfeast.wordpress.com/
                          Check out my blog. Hope to share lots of great recipes and ideas!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Owly View Post
                            Actually, you can't guess whether someone who is overweight is healthy just by looking at them. Lots of people have a BMI over 25 and still have good markers of health otherwise--in fact, people who are slightly overweight have better health outcomes than people who are underweight. Obesity (BMI >30) is more often accompanied by other health conditions, but even then, there's a percentage of the population who have no co-morbidities with obesity.

                            You cannot look at a person's body size alone and assume anything about their health status.
                            This is true. There's strong evidence to suggest that people who are borderline obese, with BMI 29-30, during middle age have the best longevity. There's a survival advantage to carrying a little extra weight, especially when its muscle of course. It's also associated with greater bone strength. That said, it's worth bearing in mind that these stats are skewed by the fact that with today's abundance of food and sedentary lifestyle, being of normal weight in middle age without making much effort to achieve that is frequently associated with failure to thrive, nutrient absorption problems and metabolic disorders, all of which shorten lifespan.

                            It's the epidemic of high % body fat, especially central obesity, during childhood and young adulthood, that will cause serious adverse health outcomes.
                            Last edited by paleo-bunny; 04-10-2012, 10:45 AM. Reason: grammar
                            F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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                            • #15
                              @Camel - ha! Well, yes, I am exaggerating, but I feel like all the threads I'm reading keep devolving into "you just need to eat less, you fatty fat Americans!"

                              Part of the reason for the rise in the real food movements, be they paleo or otherwise, are because our government & most of our doctors have been touting for DECADES now completely incorrect dietary advice. You can say that we shouldn't have been paying as much attention to the fad diets & the food pyramid, I suppose, but if you can't trust your doctor, who's supposed to have your health in mind, who can you trust? Obviously, we're all learning this on our own, but you get my point.
                              And forget not that the earth delights to feel your bare feet and the wind longs to play with your hair
                              Kahlil Gibran

                              http://simplesunshine.wordpress.com

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