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I don't understand why you should focus on macronutrients

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  • I don't understand why you should focus on macronutrients

    Why would low carbing help with fat-loss? As long as you get some fat, carbs and protein I'd say you just focus on calories in and out to either lose, maintain or gain weight. And just make sure you eat real food.

  • #2
    Do your research next time. Perhaps start with actually reading the primal blueprint, and then move on to a film like Fat Head - which is very accessible.

    Oh yes - and Gary Taubes' 'Good Calories Bad Calories' will also nix that calories in/calories out thing you've got going on.
    Last edited by Goosejuggler; 04-10-2012, 02:40 AM. Reason: Add Taubes
    The Paleo Strongwoman - A site dedicated to strength, and feeding strength.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Goosejuggler View Post
      Do your research next time. Perhaps start with actually reading the primal blueprint, and then move on to a film like Fat Head - which is very accessible.

      Oh yes - and Gary Taubes' 'Good Calories Bad Calories' will also nix that calories in/calories out thing you've got going on.
      I second that...

      Created by MyFitnessPal.com - Free Calorie Counter

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Therealdeal View Post
        Why would low carbing help with fat-loss? As long as you get some fat, carbs and protein I'd say you just focus on calories in and out to either lose, maintain or gain weight. And just make sure you eat real food.
        While low-carb diets don't change the fundamental laws of thermodynamics,

        1. Many people find carbohydrates are extremely un-satiating on a per-calorie basis
        2. When dealing with things that are sweet/sugary, there is an addictive quality that can trigger binges/overeating in some individuals.
        3. For people with insulin resistance, blood sugar spikes produced by excessive carbohydrate consumption are harmful. Excess blood sugar isn't great for people who are insulin-sensitive either, but the tolerance for carbohydrate intake is significantly higher in that instance.
        4. Excessive carb intake with a sedentary lifestyle *will* lead to fat storage. It's a simple matter of excess carbohydrate having nowhere else to go if one consumes it in large quantities and muscle/liver glycogen is full.

        I'm not a huge proponent of low-carb personally, but it's definitely a practice that has significant benefits for certain people. For a sedentary, overweight individual, a lower-carb diet makes a lot of sense. For an athlete who is training hard and burning through a lot of glycogen, carb requirements for optimal performance will be higher.
        Last edited by jsa23; 04-10-2012, 03:23 AM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Goosejuggler View Post
          Do your research next time. Perhaps start with actually reading the primal blueprint, and then move on to a film like Fat Head - which is very accessible.

          Oh yes - and Gary Taubes' 'Good Calories Bad Calories' will also nix that calories in/calories out thing you've got going on.
          Fat-head is basically low-carbs "Forks over Knives". I wouldn't recommend either.
          Neither Fathead or Good Calories Bad Calories disprove calories in/calories out.

          TS I generally agree, but there's different satiating levels to different foods. Playing around with macros can have different effects on satiety and mood/energy. But generally it's hard to go wrong with sticking whole foods and having some food variation.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Forgotmylastusername View Post
            Fat-head is basically low-carbs "Forks over Knives". I wouldn't recommend either.
            Neither Fathead or Good Calories Bad Calories disprove calories in/calories out.
            Fat head is kinda funny, but no I don't recommend it as particularly educational. Good Calories Bad Calories is a good book. Highly recommended. Nobody is trying to "disprove" calories in/calories out. Just pointing out that it is a fairly useless or at the very least incomplete model for weight loss. Hormone signals based on what kind of calories are consumed is what counts.

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            • #7
              The way I see it, it's not a question of whether creating a caloric deficit will help you lose weight. The problem is our inability to calculate the way different eating habits changes our "calories out" side of the equation. Caloric expenditure is largely dependent on the type/quality of the calories in. So figuring out "caloric expenditure" by adding bad estimations from the treadmill readout to your inaccurately calculated BMR is less than worthless. Your body has some very advanced systems (HPA axis, thyroid, etc...) that adjust the expenditure of energy based on many factors, including what you eat.

              So stating that low-carb and/or paleo/primal (not to conflate the two and open an additional worm can) denies that caloric surpluses and deficits will result in weight gains or losses, respectively, is in essence, the hanging of a strawman.
              The Champagne of Beards

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Goosejuggler View Post
                Do your research next time. Perhaps start with actually reading the primal blueprint, and then move on to a film like Fat Head - which is very accessible.
                All over the world, you will find people who are lean and healthy eating quite a high percentage of carbohydrate.
                You lousy kids! Get off my savannah!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Grumpy Caveman View Post
                  All over the world, you will find people who are lean and healthy eating quite a high percentage of carbohydrate.
                  But as pointed out in GCBC, you can also find examples of people eating very low calorie diets with high percentages of the wrong carbohydrates that are obese. (Pima Indians)

                  I'm not saying that carbs are the be-all-end-all when it comes to fat storage, but insulin is at the root of it, and carbohydrates drive insulin. There is no violation of the laws of thermodynamics. Every calorie you consume is either burned, stored or excreted. Which one of these happens is primarily dependent on hormone activity.

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                  • #10
                    @OP you don't need to focus on it. Cut out processed foods (including wheat products) and start eating real food your carb level goes way down even while eating a tonne of veggies. As others have said once you do this you will feel more satisfied, have fewer cravings and less likely to snack (once you have learned to listen to your body).
                    EAT REAL FOOD!
                    Eating primal is not a diet, it is a way of life.
                    PS
                    Don't forget to play!

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                    • #11
                      Part of the primal blueprint talks about ramping up your fat burning machinery. There does need to be some new enzymes formed and change over of metabolic machinery to do so. So when you are in a caloric deficit you are prepared to burn fat for fuel....your body fat to be precise. When you fast...when you eat low calorie....it is a high fat diet you are consuming. It is your body fat that provides the energy required to go about your day in these states. If the metabolic machinery to burn fat efficiently is already in place then you can truck about your day without that numbing fatigue, gut pain, low sugar headaches, and so on and so forth. That is the real advantage to being a good fat burning machine.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by RichMahogany View Post
                        The way I see it, it's not a question of whether creating a caloric deficit will help you lose weight. The problem is our inability to calculate the way different eating habits changes our "calories out" side of the equation. Caloric expenditure is largely dependent on the type/quality of the calories in. So figuring out "caloric expenditure" by adding bad estimations from the treadmill readout to your inaccurately calculated BMR is less than worthless. Your body has some very advanced systems (HPA axis, thyroid, etc...) that adjust the expenditure of energy based on many factors, including what you eat.

                        So stating that low-carb and/or paleo/primal (not to conflate the two and open an additional worm can) denies that caloric surpluses and deficits will result in weight gains or losses, respectively, is in essence, the hanging of a strawman.
                        But, if a caloric deficit works, which it does, you don't have to know much about calories out. Just restrict until weightloss occurs. If you don't eat, you can't gain weight.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by dboxing View Post
                          But, if a caloric deficit works, which it does, you don't have to know much about calories out. Just restrict until weightloss occurs. If you don't eat, you can't gain weight.
                          Just wanted to poke my head in and say yes, you can undereat and gain weight. BTDT. Started losing again when I upped my caloric intake because my body no longer thought it was starving.
                          http://cattaillady.com/ My blog exploring the beginning stages of learning how to homestead. With the occasional rant.

                          Originally Posted by TheFastCat: Less is more more or less

                          And now I have an Etsy store: CattailsandCalendula

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                          • #14
                            Actually, if you are insulin resistant, it is not the blood sugar spikes that is a problem, it's the constantly raised insulin. Insulin drives fat storage and prevents fat loss. And for people who aren't insulin resistant, eating a high carb low calorie diet as recommended by various CW sources, makes you hungry every couple of hours, which then means you snack every few hours thus keeping your insulin high for longer periods of the day which again drives fat storage.
                            Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by dboxing View Post
                              But, if a caloric deficit works, which it does, you don't have to know much about calories out. Just restrict until weightloss occurs. If you don't eat, you can't gain weight.
                              That sounds so pleasant. If I just deny my body its biological needs, I can lose weight, screw up my brain chemistry, and be miserable at ALL times.

                              Why wouldn't I pick that option over eating in a way that results in satiety, nourishment, energy, and the lean, healthy body that is my birthright?
                              The Champagne of Beards

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