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Difficult to Impossible to be Primal in India

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  • #16
    Originally posted by MightyMouse View Post
    That woman has way to much make up on.
    You mean it isn't natural to look like a cross between a Japanese doll and some sort of exotic fish?
    Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who has said it, no matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own experience.

    In the mind of the beginner, there are many possibilities; in the mind of the expert, there are few.


    I've shaken hands with a raccoon and lived to tell the tale

    SW: 220- 225 pounds at the beginning of January
    CW: 180 pounds

    Goals for 2012: Lose a bit more fat and start a serious muscle and strength routine

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    • #17
      My thoughts exactly. I prefer all natural...
      KFCialis - It may be boneless...but you won't be! - Stephen Colbert

      My Powerlifting journal in preparation for my first meet - http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread54184.html

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      • #18
        I just try to do as good as I can, I suppose - this goes not only for trips abroad, but also to all kinds of "not everyday" situations like holidays for example (Christmas, Easter, birthdays). I try to stick to primal as much as I can. But when I do yield to temptation, I make sure what I eat is stuff that's really worth the cheat - stuff I really like and that's really good, not plain bread for example, but French raisin bread for Easter - it's sort of a delicacy.

        Now I'll be leaving for France next Friday and this is going to be my first trip abroad since going primal. I am a little nervous how I will manage to stick to my eating habits with all the croissants and other temptations around. But I'll do my best under the circumstances and try not to look back and regret it

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Sol y Sombra View Post
          Now I'll be leaving for France next Friday and this is going to be my first trip abroad since going primal. I am a little nervous how I will manage to stick to my eating habits with all the croissants and other temptations around. But I'll do my best under the circumstances and try not to look back and regret it
          Agreed the breads are tempting but on the plus side the French have one of the most fabulously primal diets. Lots of butter, cream and natural meats, they are very fussy about where their meat and veggies come from, and the markets are so fabulous, straight from the farm to the table, you really could do a lot worse.
          Perseverance is not a long race; it is many short races one after the other.
          Walter Elliot

          I am a horse for a single harness, not cut out for tandem or teamwork; for well I know that in order to attain any definite goal, it is imperative that one person do the thinking and the commanding. Albert Einstein

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          • #20
            Originally posted by paleo-bunny View Post
            Cost, if eating out.

            Choice of restaurants, if it's an action-packed itinery on an organised tour.
            If eating out Aberdeen Angus which can only be grass fed btw because of it's nature, is available everywhere and because it's the home of the Angus, not too expensive, alternatively readily available in the local markets if you're self catering.

            Choice of restaurants - I've never known a tour use little chef or macdonalds, so again it would be safe to say that AA is on the menu, as long as you avoid the deep fried mars bars, you'll be ok. One of my favourite Scottish delicacies is the Haggis, unfortunately it's not so primal! Full of grains, but maybe now and again? Hmmm black pudding too....
            Perseverance is not a long race; it is many short races one after the other.
            Walter Elliot

            I am a horse for a single harness, not cut out for tandem or teamwork; for well I know that in order to attain any definite goal, it is imperative that one person do the thinking and the commanding. Albert Einstein

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            • #21
              Originally posted by MightyMouse View Post
              I was in the Chennai area before, and while I don't remember much meat being around, there was plenty of fresh fruit and veggies.

              I'm headed to Ireland/Scotland for a two week tour later this summer. I'm worried about losing to much strength as I doubt I'll be able to get enough calories/protein. Any tips on foods to bring? I could stash some quality jerky perhaps.
              Enough protein? Start you day with an Ulster fry, you can't go wrong. And in Scotland proper I never saw any shortage of meat or fried food. And in the South of Ireland they have great bacon and cabbage, wonderful stuff. Course if you don't like bacon you might have to IF a bit, but there is still lots of lamb about, or good mutton if you look. What about haggis in Scotland? That's basically a lamb pudding.

              I can't remember off the top of my head the difference between a full English breakfast and the Scottish, Ulster and Irish equivalents. Slightly different ingredients probably. Its all good. And everywhere you main meat is lamb, not beef. Plus anywhere coastal should have great fish. You should not be bringing dried food with you, that's ridiculous. When I go camping I usually fry up some big lamb steaks on my little gas bottle stove. If you are going in summer your biggest problem is going
              to be keeping warm and dry, lol.

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              • #22
                Kippers (smoked fish) or porridge are popular choices for breakfast. I expect that something resembling the full English will be readily available for breakfast, or boiled eggs.

                I've only ever visited Edinburgh which is of course very cosmopolitan so you can eat virtually any world cuisine you like there. Glasgow is likewise.

                Meatwise you should be OK as others have pointed out. Anecdotally, when my parents visited Scotland they were shocked at how few vegetables were served with meals, especially outside the cities. If you eat potatoes they will be readily available.

                My experience of comprehensive organised tours in other countries is no choice of restaurant at lunchtime, and often very limited choice of food, often wheat-based, and that this varies from day to day - some days it can be a proper meal with meat/fish and vegetables. Sometimes there is only fast food on offer. So the best option at lunchtime can be IF or eating your own foods that you have on standby. Tinned fish is a good choice, which you should be able to pick up in food shops very easily. However, I would advise you to take some of your own food with you, as touring holidays tend to be very active and you will get hungry. Take a picnic-ing kit including disposable paper plates and plastic knives and forks.

                Evening meals usually provide a better choice - sometimes you have to eat with the group and sometimes you can chose where you eat, depending on location and timing. This really depends on the type of tour you are doing, but I'm guessing it'll be quite comprehensive with a very full itinery given the distance you are travelling to do it.
                Last edited by paleo-bunny; 04-21-2012, 03:38 AM. Reason: grammar
                F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Baba View Post
                  Yes to all of that. In India you cannot escape vegetable oils and getting your protein is a real problem.
                  Yes to the protein. My neighbor was an indian guy and he was about 6 foot or so and weighed 165 pounds. He was the most skinny fat person I have ever seen. I guess that is what happens when you eat mostly rice.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by jimhensen View Post
                    Yes to the protein. My neighbor was an indian guy and he was about 6 foot or so and weighed 165 pounds. He was the most skinny fat person I have ever seen. I guess that is what happens when you eat mostly rice.
                    I can believe that.
                    F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by paleo-bunny View Post
                      Kippers (smoked fish) or porridge are popular choices for breakfast. I expect that something resembling the full English will be readily available for breakfast, or boiled eggs. [...]
                      Mmm, kippers. That would be my breakfast choice. It is so long since I have had a good one. I don't believe freshly smoked kippers from Robin Hoods Bay can be beaten anywhere in the world. Although I expect Scottish kippers would be good too.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by paleo-bunny View Post
                        I can believe that.
                        The funny thing is you could never tell when his t shirt was on. He just looked like lean, athletic guy. Then I saw some beach pictures of him and my jaw dropped. I swear my three year old has more muscle definition.

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