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What If Fat Doesn’t Need to Be "Burned"?

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  • What If Fat Doesn’t Need to Be "Burned"?

    Everything I read on weight loss talks about needing to “burn” the fat in your fat cells in order to reduce it. This theory seems to imply that the fatty acids would never leave the fat cell unless there was an energy demand communicated to the cell.

    Yet everything I read about the physiology behind fat release says that when insulin levels fall below a certain threshold, lipase is stimulated, which breaks down the triglycerides in the fat cell releasing glycerol and fatty acids into the bloodstream. Nothing I have read about the release of fatty acids mensions an energy demand being part of the process.

    What if fatty acids were automatically released and were floating around in the bloodstream available for burning if energy is needed, but routed via the bile to the gut if it was not? Then it would be simply eliminated, never used, through the stool. Excess fatty acids from diet, since they would be mixed among these in the bloodstream, would be re-routed in the same way.

    Fatty stools float, so could floating stool be a sign of elimination of excess, therefore "unbured" fatty acids?

    Curious about others’ thoughts on this.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Geode View Post
    Everything I read on weight loss talks about needing to “burn” the fat in your fat cells in order to reduce it. This theory seems to imply that the fatty acids would never leave the fat cell unless there was an energy demand communicated to the cell.

    Yet everything I read about the physiology behind fat release says that when insulin levels fall below a certain threshold, lipase is stimulated, which breaks down the triglycerides in the fat cell releasing glycerol and fatty acids into the bloodstream. Nothing I have read about the release of fatty acids mensions an energy demand being part of the process.

    What if fatty acids were automatically released and were floating around in the bloodstream available for burning if energy is needed, but routed via the bile to the gut if it was not? Then it would be simply eliminated, never used, through the stool. Excess fatty acids from diet, since they would be mixed among these in the bloodstream, would be re-routed in the same way.

    Fatty stools float, so could floating stool be a sign of elimination of excess, therefore "unbured" fatty acids?

    Curious about others’ thoughts on this.
    Maybe you should ask yourself why the insulin level fell.

    Comment


    • #3
      There are two primary ways to induce this:

      "when insulin levels fall below a certain threshold, lipase is stimulated, which breaks down the triglycerides in the fat cell releasing glycerol and fatty acids into the bloodstream."

      Through exercise or fasting.

      So in either case it is relevant to energy demand.

      I do not think it is possible for fat to be eliminated through bile/gut in healthy persons.

      Comment


      • #4
        Yes, there is an energy demand, but the only thing the fat cell directly knows about is the drop in insulin levels. The fat cell has no idea whether the person is an elite athlete or in a wheelchair. In the case of the person who does not expend a lot of energy, what happens to the released fatty acids that are not used by the muscle cells? They cannot be put back in the fat cells as long as insulin levels remain low.

        In the normal person, about 95% of bile is re-absorbed and the rest is excreted.

        So I guess my point is that there is an assumption that every fat calorie must be burned, but I'm not so sure that is the case. I wonder if we can release stored fat calories without ever using them.
        Last edited by Geode; 04-04-2012, 02:23 PM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Geode View Post
          Yes, there is an energy demand, but the only thing the fat cell directly knows about is the drop in insulin levels. The fat cell has no idea whether the person is an elite athlete or in a wheelchair. In the case of the person who does not expend a lot of energy, what happens to the released fatty acids that are not used by the muscle cells? They cannot be put back in the fat cells as long as insulin levels remain low.

          In the normal person, about 95% of bile is re-absorbed and the rest is excreted.
          You should have stopped with "Yes, there is an energy demand".

          Comment


          • #6
            If the person is on a diet that keeps insulin consistenly low, the fat cells will release fatty acids at a consistent rate regardless of energy demand. I'm wondering what happens to the fatty acids that are not used.

            Comment


            • #7
              The carbon from the molecules in fatty acids is turned into carbon dioxide and exhaled rather than excreted. I think fattier stools have more to do with eating more fat than could be absorbed.
              http://www.facebook.com/daemonized

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Geode View Post
                If the person is on a diet that keeps insulin consistenly low, the fat cells will release fatty acids at a consistent rate regardless of energy demand. I'm wondering what happens to the fatty acids that are not used.
                I very much doubt that the bolded statement is actually true. What is your basis for believing this?
                Today I will: Eat food, not poison. Plan for success, not settle for failure. Live my real life, not a virtual one. Move and grow, not sit and die.

                My Primal Journal

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Uncephalized View Post
                  I very much doubt that the bolded statement is actually true. What is your basis for believing this?
                  agreed. fat is either burned or stored. it's not mobilized just cause insulin is low. you are always burning something for energy, glucose or fat. if fatty acids are present in the blood stream, they're being burned, or on their way to being stored (they can hang out a bit longer than blood sugar can).

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The question that started this thread sounds like a sales pitch for a new drug from a big pharma rep. What if we could just poo it all out regardless of energy need or usage?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
                      The question that started this thread sounds like a sales pitch for a new drug from a big pharma rep. What if we could just poo it all out regardless of energy need or usage?
                      I used to seriously post here, now I prefer to troll.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Uncephalized View Post
                        I very much doubt that the bolded statement is actually true. What is your basis for believing this?
                        Every study I have read that explained the mechanism of fat storage and release show that insulin level is the determining factor. Nothing at all about energy demand. Energy demand would determine the number of fatty acids that were burned *after* release. If more fatty acids are released than burned, then what happens to the surplus? It cannot go back into the fat cells because it would need insulin to do so.

                        There are a lot of beliefs surrounding the mechanisms of fat storage and release, but I would like to see actual studies that demonstrate a physiological mechamism for handling surplus fatty acids that are released as a result of low insulin levels along with low energy demand.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by iniQuity View Post
                          LOL....I knew I'd heard of this before! F'n advertising! Its in my subconscious gnawing at my thoughts! Get it out! Get it out!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I believe I found a piece of the puzzle. From Wikipedia: Ketone Bodies:

                            "Acetone is produced by spontaneous decarboxylation of acetoacetate (meaning this ketone body will break down in five hours if it is not needed for energy and be removed as waste. This "use it or lose it" factor contributes to much of the weight loss found in ketogenic diets."

                            I suspect that some unused free fatty acids are excreted in the stool, hence steatorrhea or "floating stools". Others are converted to ketones which, if unused, are excreted in the urine, as stated above. I would still like to read a study that demonstrates the underlying physiology.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Low insulin does not necessarily equate to a ketogenic diet. Also you still haven't explained your reasoning regarding why you think insulin levels are independent of energy demands. Also, AFAIK it is the relative concentration of the hormone pair insulin and glucagon that determines how much fat is being released or stored at any given time.
                              Today I will: Eat food, not poison. Plan for success, not settle for failure. Live my real life, not a virtual one. Move and grow, not sit and die.

                              My Primal Journal

                              Comment

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