Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Why are sweet potatoes superior to normal potatoes?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Why are sweet potatoes superior to normal potatoes?

    Just curious!

  • #2
    Beause they are orange, and they taste awesome.

    Less starch, more protein perhaps? Good question that one.
    Do what you love and do it often. If you don't like something, change it. if you don't like your job, quit. If you don't have enough time, stop watching tv. If you are looking for the love of your life, stop, they will be waiting for you when you start doing the things you love. Stop over analyzing, life is simple. When you eat, appreciate every last bite. Some opportunities only come once, seize them.

    https://www.facebook.com/ForgedFromFat

    Comment


    • #3
      Sweet potatoes are strongly anti-inflammatory. White potatoes are mildly inflammatory.

      Sweet potatoes have a superior micronutrient profile, especially for vitamins A and C. They are also higher in fiber.

      Nutrition Facts and Analysis for Sweet potato, cooked, baked in skin, without salt [Sweetpotato]

      Nutrition Facts and Analysis for Potato, baked, flesh and skin, without salt
      F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

      Comment


      • #4
        I don't really think one is superior to the other. Although I LOVE sweet potatoes. But I like the white potatoes too.

        @paleo-bunny: I wouldn't put too much weight into the inflammatory index on Nutrition Data. It's basically a formula that someone came up with that isn't accurate in all cases. I think it demonizes saturated fat and glorifies PUFA. Case in point, corn/canola oil is seen as anti-inflammatory: Nutrition Facts and Analysis for Oil, corn and canola
        The formula is also affected by serving size.

        I like white potatoes better for my post-workout carb. Sweet potatoes have more fiber so they don't digest as quickly. If you're not carbing up, that's a good property though.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by yodiewan View Post
          I don't really think one is superior to the other. Although I LOVE sweet potatoes. But I like the white potatoes too.

          @paleo-bunny: I wouldn't put too much weight into the inflammatory index on Nutrition Data. It's basically a formula that someone came up with that isn't accurate in all cases. I think it demonizes saturated fat and glorifies PUFA. Case in point, corn/canola oil is seen as anti-inflammatory: Nutrition Facts and Analysis for Oil, corn and canola
          The formula is also affected by serving size.

          I like white potatoes better for my post-workout carb. Sweet potatoes have more fiber so they don't digest as quickly. If you're not carbing up, that's a good property though.
          Yes, I've noticed that Nutrition Data's inflammatory index is very flawed too, especially with regards to fats. However, I've read elsewhere that sweet potatoes have strong anti-inflammatory properties, so I believe in this case it is correct. I find the site a useful source of information regarding micronutrient content, and that was my reason for posting the links.

          I rarely eat sweet potatoes post-workout for the reason you cite. I usually eat them at lunchtime about 5-6 hours before a workout. White-rice is my starch of choice for muscle recovery and glycogen replenishment post-workout.
          Last edited by paleo-bunny; 04-02-2012, 04:42 AM. Reason: added last line
          F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by paleo-bunny View Post
            I find the site a useful source of information regarding micronutrient content, and that was my reason for posting the links.
            Totally agree. Nutrition Data is awesome for showing detailed macro- and micronutrient breakdowns.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by yodiewan View Post
              Totally agree. Nutrition Data is awesome for showing detailed macro- and micronutrient breakdowns.
              Yes, I find it useful for macronutrient breakdown too. Especially when it provides a full breakdown of carbs into sugars, starch and fiber.
              F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

              Comment


              • #8
                I think it's mostly left-over from differentiating paleo from SAD. To me, the best indicator as to what foods are best for me(as someone who has been primal for a comparatively long time), is digestive consequences. White potatoes don't have them, sweet potatoes do, so I eat white potatoes, not sweet. I know the same is the case for at least a few other people on here.
                Lifting Journal

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hey Jesse... great to chat with you the other night.
                  White potatoes have more Potassium and Lutein
                  Sweet potatoes have more soluble fiber, Vitamin C, and way more Beta Carotene (hence the orange color).

                  Hope that helps... peace - jv

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I agree what has already been said, but I would like to add:

                    White potatoes are in the nightshade family so many people have issues digesting them, sweet potatoes are not.
                    Primal since March 2011

                    Female/29 years old/5' 1"/130ish lbs

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by activia View Post
                      I agree what has already been said, but I would like to add:

                      White potatoes are in the nightshade family so many people have issues digesting them, sweet potatoes are not.
                      Do you think it's important for anyone with nightshade intolerances to avoid white potatoes?

                      I only eat them from time to time, mostly when I'm eating out (same goes for bell peppers).

                      I haven't noticed any reaction to white potatoes. However, I have a strong intolerance to tomatoes, aubergines and chillis. Could it be that I am avoiding white potatoes unecessarily? I suppose the only way to find out is to experiment with eating more white potatoes of various varieties.
                      F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I wish I could eat sweet potatoes/yams - the orange ones. Real sweet potatoes around here aren't orange, they're yellow/white-ish.

                        But, I'm type 2 diabetic and can only eat a VERY small portion of the orange goodness. The portion is so small that it isn't even worth it.

                        At least I can eat the amount of a small/medium white potato(once in awhile) and not get the high fasting sugars the next day. Eating that same amount in sweet potato isn't good for me.


                        You lucky bastards.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Lily Marie View Post
                          At least I can eat the amount of a small/medium white potato(once in awhile) and not get the high fasting sugars the next day.
                          Being diabetic, you almost certainly know more about blood sugar issues (particularly your own) than I do, but wouldn't it be more of an issue an hour or two later, rather than the next day. I'd hate to think that you are spiking your blood sugar big time in the afternoon, and checking it in the morning and thinking it was fine.

                          Again, you may be all over this and know what you're talking about, but the fact that you focused on the next day's reading seemed odd to me.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I think regular potatoes contain a lectin and also don't have as many anti oxidants.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by paleo-bunny View Post
                              Do you think it's important for anyone with nightshade intolerances to avoid white potatoes?

                              I only eat them from time to time, mostly when I'm eating out (same goes for bell peppers).

                              I haven't noticed any reaction to white potatoes. However, I have a strong intolerance to tomatoes, aubergines and chillis. Could it be that I am avoiding white potatoes unecessarily? I suppose the only way to find out is to experiment with eating more white potatoes of various varieties.
                              You can experiment if you like and you think they would be beneficial to you. I honestly don't bother.. except I'll have mashed potatoes on a special occasion like thanksgiving. Sometimes once we heal our guts certain food intolerance's go away as well (this occurs mostly with dairy)
                              Primal since March 2011

                              Female/29 years old/5' 1"/130ish lbs

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X