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Grain-fed Beef - Eating 2 pounds per day. Dangerous?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by lssanjose View Post
    The reason for that kind of protein calculation is based on your having not as much body fat, as before, thus having your lean muscle mass higher? Thanks. I'm still doing the 70%-80% of lean muscle mass formula, and wonder if I should ramp it up to the amount of lean muscle mass.
    Protein consumption is generally considered to be ideal in the 1-2g/lb of lean body mass range from what I've read. If you're overweight, in my opinion, you should be eating an even higher level of protein than someone who is lean. And here's why I believe that to be:

    1.) Protein has the highest TEF - roughly 20-30% of calories are lost from your metabolism increasing. Your body works hard to process protein, where carbohydrates are much easier to process and fats are by far the simplest of all. This far outshines fat and carbohydrate and is a huge metabolic advantage. If you have a lot of weight to lose, pushing more calories to protein allows you to create a larger caloric deficit without cutting back on portion size. Basically, you can eat more eye round than ribeye before you halt your fat loss.

    2.) If you're overweight, you're going to be losing fat at a faster rate than someone who is underweight. Your state of catabolism will last a long time - someone with 100 lbs of weight to lose will be spending a year or two in a state of catabolism, while someone that needs to drop 5 lbs could do it in a few weeks. Since you'll be in a state of catabolism longer, that's more reason to eat protein to preserve as much muscle as possible during the extended weight loss period.

    3.) The increased protein will better adapt you to managing your hunger since it "stick with you" longer. You'll get used to eating less often, so when you get lean you'll be more likely to successfully intermittent fast regularly.

    A lean person looking to maintain their weight or slowly add lean muscle mass could get away with less protein. FWIW, my off days usually peg me at 130-150g of protein, while my workout days are usually 175-200+g of protein.
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Sihana
      I will do something no one else does on this forums.

      I admit I was wrong.

      I assumed it was more calorie dense, and not just more nutrient dense and slower digestion. Thank's for the correction.
      Ha. Looking back from what I believed when I first started Primal vs now, I'd say nearly all of my posts in the first 6 months were wrong, and I can't vouch for the accuracy of anything I've said after that. Damn n=1 experiments...
      Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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      • #18
        Grass-fed meat IS more calorie/protein dense than the regular grocery store/grain fed beef.
        It's because the grocery store meat is pumped with water. It adds weight and more to the price tag.

        EVERY time I try to cook a Safeway ribeye steak in a pan, the damn thing fills up with water and dilutes my butter. Pisses me off.
        I'm done with grocery store meat - unless in a dire situation.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Lily Marie View Post
          Grass-fed meat IS more calorie/protein dense than the regular grocery store/grain fed beef.
          It's because the grocery store meat is pumped with water. It adds weight and more to the price tag.

          EVERY time I try to cook a Safeway ribeye steak in a pan, the damn thing fills up with water and dilutes my butter. Pisses me off.
          I'm done with grocery store meat - unless in a dire situation.
          Minimally processed grain-fed meat is more calorically dense than minimally processed grass-fed meat. You're not buying minimally processed meat. The overwhelming majority of grocery store meats are not pumped up with anything. Beef, pork, veal and lamb are almost always safe as they come cut straight from the store butcher and are on plastic trays wrapped in plastic wrap. What you have to be careful with are cuts that don't come from the store. Chicken breast is usually sent pre-packaged, as it pork loin, beef tenderloin, whole chickens/turkeys/ducks/geese and the like. Those things packaged out of store are generally pumped up with a salt and sugar solution. You have to read the labels and make sure they specifically state "minimally processed". All the chicken, beef and pork I buy from the grocery store are minimally processed and contain no solution.

          Simply put, if you're buying meat with a label on it, it wasn't packaged in-store and didn't come from the butcher. It was loaded already sliced and packaged on a truck somewhere. Buy the meat that's cut in-house, or specifically ask the butcher for a fresh cut, not pre-packaged meat.
          Last edited by ChocoTaco369; 03-13-2012, 10:34 AM.
          Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
            Minimally processed grain-fed meat is more calorically dense than minimally processed grass-fed meat. You're not buying minimally processed meat. The overwhelming majority of grocery store meats are not pumped up with anything. Beef, pork, veal and lamb are almost always safe as they come cut straight from the store butcher and are on plastic trays wrapped in plastic wrap. What you have to be careful with are cuts that don't come from the store. Chicken breast is usually sent pre-packaged, as it pork loin, beef tenderloin, whole chickens/turkeys/ducks/geese and the like. Those things packaged out of store are generally pumped up with a salt and sugar solution. You have to read the labels and make sure they specifically state "minimally processed". All the chicken, beef and pork I buy from the grocery store are minimally processed and contain no solution.

            Simply put, if you're buying meat with a label on it, it wasn't packaged in-store and didn't come from the butcher. It was loaded already sliced and packaged on a truck somewhere. Buy the meat that's cut in-house, or specifically ask the butcher for a fresh cut, not pre-packaged meat.
            I'll consider this, in the near future. I also avoid those cuts with solutions in them, and just find straight up meat.
            If you have a problem with what you read: 1. Get a dictionary 2. Don't read it 3. Grow up 4. After 3, go back to 1/ or 2. -- Dennis Blue. | "I don't care about your opinion, only your analysis"- Professor Calabrese. | "Life is more important than _______" - Drew | I eat animals that eat vegetables -- Matt Millen, former NFL Linebacker. | "This country is built on sugar & shit that comes in a box marinated in gluten - abc123

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            • #21
              I eat about 2lbs of grain-fed value beef mince a day. I counter this with Krill Oil capsules rather than Fish Oil. The astaxanthin in the Krill stops it from going rancid, and the omegas in krill are used more efficiently.

              Also, with tinned fish - you are absorbing a lot of bpa's and other toxins from the can.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by lssanjose View Post
                I'll consider this, in the near future. I also avoid those cuts with solutions in them, and just find straight up meat.
                I saw an awesome special on pork loin last weekend. It looked beautiful, and for $1.99/lb, I figured why not. I picked it up, tossed a 10 pounder in my cart, verified the label..."contains up to a 12% solution of salt, sugar, etc." I made a completely audible gagging sound, tossed it back on the shelf and walked away shaking my head.
                Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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                • #23
                  That's gross, I never even considered checking the labels for packaged meat... any added sugar could feed my ulcerative colitis (which is in remission since Paleo started). Would they add sugar to the beef mince too?

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Sihana
                    I will do something no one else does on this forums.

                    I admit I was wrong.

                    I assumed it was more calorie dense, and not just more nutrient dense and slower digestion. Thank's for the correction.
                    So, you admit you were wrong but want to be sure to point out that you are still better than every one else here? Nice.
                    Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

                    http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by BuildingGroks View Post
                      That's gross, I never even considered checking the labels for packaged meat... any added sugar could feed my ulcerative colitis (which is in remission since Paleo started). Would they add sugar to the beef mince too?
                      I think one of the big problems (at least in the US) is that they don't have to put everything on the labels. As long as it is below a certain percentage it is considered to be not present. I think Iread that this is the case for the formaldehyde in orange juice and for the pink slime stuff.

                      I sincerely hope labeling laws are better in the UK.
                      Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

                      http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by jammies View Post
                        I think one of the big problems (at least in the US) is that they don't have to put everything on the labels. As long as it is below a certain percentage it is considered to be not present. I think Iread that this is the case for the formaldehyde in orange juice and for the pink slime stuff.

                        I sincerely hope labeling laws are better in the UK.
                        I very much doubt they are better, we are all lambs for the slaughter to the FDA.

                        If I lived in the right environment, I would consider hunting for my own food rather than eating what someone else has prepared. Although, the animals in the wild probably have human-made toxins coursing through their bodies which would end up festering in my bowel anyway.

                        It's a lose-lose situation really lol.

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                        • #27
                          how can i keep an almost only-animal-foods diet, while eating less protein, because i think im eating too much. and i dont think that eating more tallow/lard/butter than meat/organs is something paleolithic. also i tend to avoid heavy cream, because of pasteurisation.
                          by the way how do those meat-eaters used to eat more organs than muscles? because i've heard that hunter-gatherers eat way more organs than muscles.

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