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  • Originally posted by mcdice
    that is process of heat production in mammals
    Quit spamming the forum with your worthless one line posts just to promote your stupid blog you worthless assclown.
    __________________________________________________ _____________________________
    Eureka5280: M / 38 / 235lbs / Goal: 180lbs

    Diet: Currently experimenting with higher carb (Peat-esque) primal with emphasis on beef, dairy, seafood, sugar and a bit of starch on lifting days.

    Activities: Started Stronglifts 5x5 on 3/1/14. Adding sprints and hikes soon.
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    • The thing about cold thermogenesis is that it is an acute stress on your body. If you are in healthy state and your stress tolerance is pretty high, it can be effective for weight loss to an extent. I have used it in the past and it worked well in conjunction with a fat loss diet. I no longer do it because I feel there are a lot of negative health benefits to conscientiously adding certain acute stressors back into my life (I'd much rather stick to exercise as my main one.) Not only is the prolonged cold a physiological stress, but the idea of knowing that I'm going to be taking a cold shower or ice bath adds of a ton on emotional stress as well. Just a few thoughts based on my experiences.
      Salube Up! - SalubriousU

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      • "We have showed that the skin affects the metabolism in the liver, and that is quite a surprise," stated the team. "We believe that the leaking of water from the skin makes the mice feel cold, and that this leads to breaking down of fat in their adipose (fat) tissue. The broken down fat is then moved to the liver. The mice move energy from the tissues to the liver."

        Is this true? Could it apply to humans? Found it on craptacular Natural News so my first reaction is "B.S.!" but I see it on the web, too.
        Crohn's, doing SCD

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        • Search calories burned during SCUBA diving. There's probably something to cold thermogenesis.
          "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

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          Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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          • Is anyone still doing this?

            I just listen to Kruse on a podcast and was very intrigued. That very day I was determined to try the cold shower. But I couldn't go through with it because it was too cold. I stepped in the tub and got my feet wet, but that was about it. I got cold feet! Lol.

            But I did turn off the heat in my apartment. And I stopped wearing a coat. The temperature here only gets to about 45 so it's not that cold.

            Today I noticed I was very cranky and ravenously hungry. Okay, I'm actually not hungry, but I just wanted to eat and eat and eat. I didn't bring enough food to satiate me, so I actually ate some butter. I'm in deep ketosis and have been for a week, so I'm not sure what is triggering this. Then it occurred to me that I'm uncomfortable because I'm slightly cold and maybe there's a connection.

            Anyway, I'm not giving up yet. I want to give this experiment a go. I will try the cold shower thing again...maybe gradually like some people suggested here.

            But I like reading about other people's experiences as well.

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            • Im doing it having great results. Started right in the tube, the first two times where pretty miserable but i got used to it pretty quickly. I have done this like 12 times or so in the last two month. Results are great, I feel less cold outside and use less heating and aside from this it works for me as an antistress method. it doesnt matter how fucked up i feel before after doing ct I feel really chilled.

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              • Originally posted by otzi View Post
                Mark Sisson recently discussed the benefits of cold water: Cold Water Therapy | Mark's Daily Apple
                ....

                Questions frequently asked on CT blogs:
                1. What temperature and how long?
                -- This seems to be subject of debate, but it seems you should go for the coldest you can stand. Many report good success with ice packs on neck and belly for 30 minutes a night, others like cool baths and showers, while others will actually soak in a tub filled with ice cubes for 30-60 minutes. If you live in a cold climate, exposure to outside air below freezing for 30-60 minutes a day seems to work also.

                2. Should I supplement with vitamins during CT?
                -- Keep your normal routine going. Some foods that are known to increase the effectiveness of CT are dark chocolate, turmeric, green tea, hot peppers, and cinnamon.

                3. Do I need a ketogenic diet?
                -- Dr. K says yes, Ray Cronise says no. Both agree you should eat a diet free of PUFA and processed foods (SAD).

                4. How will I know if it's working?
                -- After 2-3 weeks, you will notice you shiver less and your body radiates heat more. Fat should start to come off effortlessly. You will not be as hungry since cold shunts hunger signals.

                5. Where is the magic? Just increased calorie burn?
                -- The real magic behind CT is in activation of BAT (brown fat) and Uncoupling Proteins. Read more: Thermogenin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

                6. How do I get started?
                -- Start by filling a sink with ice cold water, cold tap water with ice cubes. Put your face in the water and leave as long as you can. This will activate your mammalian dive relex and prepare your body for longer exposure. Do this several times over a week or so. When this is tolerated well, begin taking cooler showers and baths. A common method is to take a hot shower, but for the last few minutes turn the temp down to as cold as you can stand. Work on increasing time spent in cold shower or bath To speed it up, fill a tub with cool water and gradually add ice cubes (20-40lbs). This is an advanced technique. Swimming in an unheated swimming pool or lake or ocean is also a great way to get advantage of thermal loading.

                awesome, I've been doing this from time to time after a work out.

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                • Not sure if anyone is still interested. Interesting subject, anyway. This guy is taking CT places...wait and see!

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                  • Originally posted by otzi View Post
                    In my own personal experience with CT, I live in Fairbanks, Alaska with 6 months of darkness and sub-zero temperatures at my disposal. This winter, I started doing work-outs in very cold temps wearing only shorts, shoes, gloves and hat. At first, I would shiver very easily and could not stand more than 5-10 minutes at zero or below. After several weeks, I can easily withstand 30-60 minutes at zero to -20. This helped me break through a plateau I'd hit last fall and my body radiates heat for hours afterwards. I have not tried ice baths or cool water swimming, but I have turned down my house thermostat and started taking cooler showers in the morning.

                    I have been measuring my skin surface temp with an infrared thermometer. At first, 5-10 minutes of exposure in 0 degree air would result in skin temp of 55-60 deg (measured on forearm). After 4 weeks, 30 minutes of exposure in 0 degree air results in skin temp of 75-80 deg. Skin temp in 75 degree air is approx 85-95 deg for comparison.

                    A physiological change has definitely occured to my metabolism.
                    How is it that hibernating bears emerge from a sedentary state, having burned nothing but stored body fat for months, muscle-bound and the fittest they'll be all year?
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                    • It's been in the news lately.
                      Health Advice from a Grizzly - Scientific American

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                      • Does anyone still think Cold thermogenesis is worth it? if so, what is the minimum effective dose?

                        I've heard about Jack Kruse, DA, TF, and Ben G all trying (regularly practicing?) CTG. But it seems like an awful lot of bother and unpleasantness and a whole lot of time. And people above seem to have not so great results -- except a whole lot of time spent splashing around in the bathtub.

                        If the goal is fat loss, why not just adjust the diet more since that is so easy to tweak comparatively and instead of spending hours in bathtub with ice cubes you can do something else.

                        Also, there is the Rhonda Patrick theory of how great hot tubs and steam saunas are great and generate IGF and heat shock proteins and in fact that is the new cure for your ED, gouty toes and whatever ails you.

                        A sauna is more pleasant if I was going to sit around in something wet at one end of the temp extreme.
                        Last edited by zmisst; 02-08-2015, 07:50 PM.

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                        • Here are the links:

                          Are Saunas the Next Big Performance-Enhancing “Drug”? | The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

                          How To Use Heat Exposure


                          Last edited by zmisst; 02-08-2015, 07:51 PM.

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                          • Originally posted by zmisst View Post
                            Does anyone still think Cold thermogenesis is worth it? if so, what is the minimum effective dose?

                            I've heard about Jack Kruse, DA, TF, and Ben G all trying (regularly practicing?) CTG. But it seems like an awful lot of bother and unpleasantness and a whole lot of time. And people above seem to have not so great results -- except a whole lot of time spent splashing around in the bathtub.

                            If the goal is fat loss, why not just adjust the diet more since that is so easy to tweak comparatively and instead of spending hours in bathtub with ice cubes you can do something else.

                            Also, there is the Rhonda Patrick theory of how great hot tubs and steam saunas are great and generate IGF and heat shock proteins and in fact that is the new cure for your ED, gouty toes and whatever ails you.

                            A sauna is more pleasant if I was going to sit around in something wet at one end of the temp extreme.
                            Cold activates brown fat, pure and simple. Brown fat burns white fat, the stuff people are trying to shed.

                            Theoretically, once adapted, regular exposure of skin to temps between 50-55 F also causes excess energy burnoff during sleep (in defiance of the CICO theory) and assists in building muscle. Think of hibernating bears, burning fat through the winter and awakening muscle bound, as if they spent the winter at the gym.

                            There are differences of opinion regarding the effective depth of CT. Some believe that exposure to any temps lower than body temperature stimulates brown fat and white fat burnoff. I think that's true. Others believe you have to go deeper, to 50-55F to get the added benefits of sleeptime burnoff and muscle deposition. I think that may also be true.
                            Last edited by John Caton; 02-09-2015, 03:53 AM.
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                            • Originally posted by John Caton View Post
                              Cold activates brown fat, pure and simple. Brown fat burns white fat, the stuff people are trying to shed.

                              Theoretically, once adapted, regular exposure of skin to temps between 50-55 F also causes excess energy burnoff during sleep (in defiance of the CICO theory) and assists in building muscle. Think of hibernating bears, burning fat through the winter and awakening muscle bound, as if they spent the winter at the gym.

                              There are differences of opinion regarding the effective depth of CT. Some believe that exposure to any temps lower than body temperature stimulates brown fat and white fat burnoff. I think that's true. Others believe you have to go deeper, to 50-55F to get the added benefits of sleeptime burnoff and muscle deposition. I think that may also be true.
                              I would assume swimming in the Atlantic Ocean in early summer would qualify as it might barely get to 55 by then. I often go snorkeling without skins and last about 20 minutes before I get signs of hypothermia and call it quits. Must say feel very invigorated afterwards but don't do it that frequently. The one summer I did do it frequently I dropped more weight in that short period of time than I ever have in my life. Coincidence or maybe it really works, who knows, all I know is it is damn hard to get up the gumption to jump in that ocean and get an instant ice cream headache!?
                              Last edited by Mainer; 02-10-2015, 06:54 PM.
                              You'll never see the light if you're in someone else's shadow, or said another way, life is like a dog sled team, if you're not the lead dog, the scenery never changes

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                              • Originally posted by Mainer View Post
                                I would assume swimming in the Atlantic Ocean in early summer would qualify as it might barely get to 55 by then. I often go snorkeling without skins and last about 20 minutes before I get signs of hypothermia and call it quits. Must say feel very invigorated afterwards but don't do it that frequently. The one summer I did do it frequently I dropped more weight in that short period of time than I ever have in my life. Coincidence or maybe it really works, who knows, all I know is it is damn hard to get up the gumption to jump in that ocean and get an instant ice cream headache!?
                                Man, do I envy you. Cold water works best. You've got it made, by golly. Furthermore, think of the magnesium and other minerals you may be receiving transdermally. If I lived there, I'd be in the water everyday, except winter of course, when the air would more than suffice. Curiosity, what is your wintertime ocean water temp?
                                Stop by to visit at http://primalways.net
                                Old Paths ... New Journeys

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