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Where are Aussies buying their grass fed butter?

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  • #16
    According to my dairy farmer friend, butter comes from Victorian cows (as opposed to mostly fresh milk from Qld). We've had a hot, dry summer and they've still got green feed for their cows, so I can't imagine the Victorians needing to use grains yet? I could be wrong of course.

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    • #17
      Australian Dairy Cattle Feed

      Originally posted by peril View Post
      Does anyone have evidence of Australian dairy cattle not being grassfed, except during drought. One of the great sights of our countryside is the queues of cows at the farm dairy come milking time
      There's a healthy discussion on this subject happening over here:
      Bulletproof Diet - Grass-Fed Butter And Meat In Australia - Bulletproof Forum

      A couple of people have made enquiries with the retailers and manufacturer's pertaining to the source of their butter and it turns out that yes, as we expect the cows are grass fed for the most part, but there is leeway for them to be fed grain / feedstock.

      Here's a link to the Organic feeding standard in Australia where you will see there is leeway to give the animal up to 5% of its food that is not necessarily a natural part of their diet. The takeaway here is buying Organic Butter is a good start, but this is not necessarily going to be grass-fed.
      http://www.organicfoodchain.com.au/N...2009%20(2).pdf

      Next time you buy grass-fed butter, take not of how yellow it is because of the beta-carotene content vs a lesser counterpart. Note that salting butter also gives it a more yellow colour, so don't let that confuse you!

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      • #18
        I shall look into the Dairy scene over here in NZ.
        DD is down at the Rodeo ( she manages a dairy farm), so will ask when I am talking to her.
        I would think that Dairy farmers, like many NZ farmers have supplimentary feed on hand - most of the time. NZ can be prone to dramatic weather changes, and the turn around can be as little as 2 weeks. Most farmers would go into the winter with barley, or grain in their silo, or lucern or meadow hay in their hayshed. The problem if you don't is when there is a dramatic change in the weather, and that can happen in any season (drought, snow etc...) where do you buy supplimentary feed ???? The costs of long haul transportation is huge, so to practice good husbandry one needs supplimentary feed on hand.
        Anyway I can only speak for a sheep and beef farmer, so I will ask the kid, and report back
        "never let the truth get in the way of a good story "

        ...small steps....

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        • #19
          Sorry can't get DD, however Dh is very knowledgable with all things farming. A common practise in NZ is for the cows to eat palm kernel whilst in the shed being milked. Or so says he - who must be obeyed.

          Anyway hopefully the DD can shed some light on that one - when she answers her phone.
          It would be interesting to note however that if feeding some form of grains is common practice in a dairy shed or on a dairy farm - how does that effect the milk and butter that we are all so happily consuming ??????
          It could be an MDA topic !
          "never let the truth get in the way of a good story "

          ...small steps....

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          • #20
            damn I really hope that is not true.
            I buy Westgold butter from our local supermarket.

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            • #21
              yep I think I will follow up on this one Ayla - It actually never crossed my mind until I read this thread .............
              "never let the truth get in the way of a good story "

              ...small steps....

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              • #22
                I need to ask my sister, her husband is a dairy farmer near Te Puke.
                Maybe I don't really want to know LOL. Na I am am pretty careful about everything else.
                I am sure I was told before they don't need supplementing in NZ, but who knows really hey?

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                • #23
                  I think alot of dairy farmers have a silage pit as well, which is sort of like a fermented, high-moisture fodder. It can be made from various grain crops. Anyway I will report back !
                  "never let the truth get in the way of a good story "

                  ...small steps....

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                  • #24
                    Thanks G. If its true, I think ill let it go and keep buying this butter, as it does taste good. We eat no other grains, and I know our meat is not supplemented, so I am happy enough with that.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by peril View Post
                      Does anyone have evidence of Australian dairy cattle not being grassfed, except during drought. One of the great sights of our countryside is the queues of cows at the farm dairy come milking time
                      Here's what our butcher has to say about this:
                      There are currently about 720,000 head of cattle in Australia’s feedlots, out of a national cattle herd of 28.5 million. This represents about 3%. So, however you look at it, the vast majority of cattle in Australia are grass-fed.
                      Food Facts - Food Facts

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by NZ primal Gwamma View Post
                        I think alot of dairy farmers have a silage pit as well, which is sort of like a fermented, high-moisture fodder. It can be made from various grain crops. Anyway I will report back !
                        Silage is made from grass. When farmers have alot of it, e.g. spring.

                        There is no way nz dairy farmers can afford to supplement with silos of barley. It just doesn't happen. Supplementary feed is hay or silage.

                        In winter, strip grazing is common and an efficient use of pasture. Alot of farmers still grow turnips for winter feed.

                        Nz does not have a subsidised farming product "system". Grain is not cheap! Eat your nz butter everyone an appreciate the love and care that has gone into pasture management. .. :-).

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Rueben View Post
                          Silage is made from grass. When farmers have alot of it, e.g. spring.

                          There is no way nz dairy farmers can afford to supplement with silos of barley. It just doesn't happen. Supplementary feed is hay or silage.

                          In winter, strip grazing is common and an efficient use of pasture. Alot of farmers still grow turnips for winter feed.

                          Nz does not have a subsidised farming product "system". Grain is not cheap! Eat your nz butter everyone an appreciate the love and care that has gone into pasture management. .. :-).
                          Gwamma is on the case............

                          Reuben you are correct in saying that silage is made from grass, however in NZ it is common practise for maise to be made into silage. Wheat paddocks are also made into silage.
                          Sometimes dairy farmers crush their barley and feed it to the Dairy cows in the shed ( this doesn't amount to much thou), and sometimes palm kernel is fed. It is usually the large scale dairy farms who suppliment crushed barley in the shed while cows are being milked.

                          Strip grazing is a very common practice in NZ and a very efficent use of pasture, and these supplimentary feeds can include kale.

                          Turnips are generally used on a sheep farm for winter supplimentation and on a dairy farm for summer supplimenation. The cows pug the pasture too much in the winter and its not an efficent way to feed them in winter.

                          anyway still waiting for DD to get back to me. She manages a 600 cow dairy farm and oversees a neighbouring 1000 cow dairy farm, has a PHD in Agriculture, so should be able to help with my enquiries.

                          I will probably still eat our gorgeous butter and drink our milk..... but curiosity...... kiiled the cat thou !!!!!
                          "never let the truth get in the way of a good story "

                          ...small steps....

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                          • #28
                            Still haven't seen any evidence to say that our standard butter isn't OK. I've seen american butter - its white - so I understand their problem. It just isn't an issue here

                            Re beef cattle, it is definitely the case that most of the time, almost all of the cattle are grassfed. However they do pass through feedlots on the way to market. The real question is for how long and what is the significance of that.

                            Pisses me off that so many pubs proudly declare their steaks to be from grain-fed cattle. I'll keep buying Aldi grass-fed scotch fillet
                            Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

                            Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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                            • #29
                              yep i buy either tasmanian butter or mainland, both are grass-fed. we've had so much rain all our cattle around here look healthy and happy (and delicious).

                              peril, i also get pissed when i read that!!! like touting that is something to be proud of. it is nice though that the places i frequent, which happen to be a few of the taverns around here, say grass fed or grain finished or whatever in their steak menu.

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                              • #30
                                Yep – Gwamma is like an old dog with a bone…………….
                                …………and no it possibly doesn’t matter
                                ………. And yes I realise that Ayla wasn’t asking about NZ butter……….
                                ………..however it is interesting and has got these old neurons excited !!!!!!

                                DD has confirmed everything that DH has said.
                                DD has also said that Maise silage or baleage is very common throughout NZ. Most modern dairy sheds will be feeding a supplement in the shed, and barley is very common, because of the cost. Also a dairy farmer can have pellets made to order, which could include minerals, extra protein etc…

                                Does feeding grain to Dairy cows affect our milk/butter/cheese, which in turn might affect us ???????????????
                                "never let the truth get in the way of a good story "

                                ...small steps....

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