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  • Perpetual Bone Broth

    Does anyone run a perpetual bone broth in a slow cooker?

    Any safety concerns? Electrical or bacterial?

    Can you mix chicken, pork, beef, lamb, turkey, etc. bones and add bones from other meals throughout the week?

    Do you run it constantly, or make a fresh one each week?

    Thanks!
    5'6" Female, 29 Years Old, 260/195/120

    "Discipline is choosing between what you want NOW, and what you want MOST!"

  • #2
    How funny/coincidental. I just ended my perpetual bone broth. I think I had it going for a week or week and a half. I'd let it go for a day or two, strain off the broth and put it into mason jars, then add more vinegar and water and let it go again. I thought it would never end. The broth did seem to get sort of light/mild after a while though. I only ended it because a) ran out of jars and b) got some beef heart I want to put in the slow cooker.
    Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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    • #3
      Great! So no worries at all with it overheating? We are new to slow cookers. :-)
      5'6" Female, 29 Years Old, 260/195/120

      "Discipline is choosing between what you want NOW, and what you want MOST!"

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      • #4
        the concern with mixing chicken/fowl with beef/lamb/etc is the high rate of oxidation of the marrow fat of bird bones. It does not deal with high/prolonged heat.

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        • #5
          I put my cooker on low. The water never boiled. I used only big beef bones. Some round ball joints and some big giant bones sawed into inch-thick rounds.

          I did make one big mistake though. I accidentally put the plastic thing in the first batch, that thing at the bottom of the styrofoam tray. I worried I was going to kill myself with plastic chemicals but decided that maybe I could live through one plastic-infused broth.
          Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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          • #6
            Hi GrokON, how many are you making stock for, and how often will you have it?

            I don't think there would be an electric problem, I mean, people leave their fridge, TVs, freezers plugged in all the time. Just make sure there's always enough water.
            Bacterial safety: make sure it's simmering at all times, if it's doesn't simmer hot enough, it's not safe.

            I have a 6 quart slowcooker, but it's never big enough to make enough stock for me. And even though it has 3 heat settings, either it's so low that the stock doesn't even simmer, or so high that it's boiling. Of-course, it's supposed to be simmering, but my crockpot can't do that apparently.

            Mixing bones: I never mix bones IN the pot, because different bones have different cooking times. But I do mix beef + chicken after it's cooked, depending if I want a heavy or light taste in my soup.

            You are supposed to start a new batch each week, I think. See here: Bone Broth in a Slowcooker | Nourished Kitchen Despite the title I think it's much easier to do it on the stove.

            My boyfriend and I eat soup for breakfast nearly every day, so we go through a lot of stock. Even so, I have no need to use a crockpot.
            Actually, if I were to use my 6 quart crockpot, it wouldn't be big enough to make stock for us, since the big beef bones won't fit.
            I'd rather put 9 beef bones in my big stock pot, cook it for 2 days and get it over with , than cook 2 or 3 beef bones in the crockpot and wait... and wait...
            This gives us 3 quarts of very, very thick stock (can cut into hard cubes with a knife), and it lasts us more than a week.

            When I have chicken bones, I'd rather make stock overnight (1 night only) and get it over with, rather than have the crockpot on all the time.

            Also, when I make stock in the crockpot, it never gels, and when I make it on the stove, it always gels really hard.
            My smartphone makes me about $100 per month
            Updating my journal again after a 2 year break.

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            • #7
              Is there a bone broth 101 type thread on here or somewhere else? Bone broth for dummies? I got 5 pounds of marrow bones from the butcher today and am having trouble figuring out what direction I want to go with them. Preferably the slow cooker I think...

              I'm pretty handy in the kitchen, so my indecisiveness in this situation is frustrating. TY.

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              • #8
                If high is too highand low wont' even simmer I just fold a bath towel and place over the lid. Even on low it will be simmering soon and I can control the simmer by moving the folded towel so it partially covers the lid.

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                • #9
                  Hmm, this is an interesting idea...I've never heard of this. I usually wait til I have a few carcasses, or equivalent amount of bones, in the freezer, make a huge batch, and then pressure can it for storage.

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                  • #10
                    Thanks so far, all!

                    I put some water into the new cooker, and put it on high for 4 hours to sort of test it out... Water got hot, but did NOT reach a rolling boil, or even a simmer. Maybe a little water movement at most. I had rather expected it would boil from being on high, so I was surprised about that. Does this mean low won't be hot enough? I can't imagine it reaching a simmer point if it didn't even TRY to simmer a little on high for 4 hours.

                    Abstractpersona, it's just my husband and I. But we don't supplement calcium, so since this will be a prime source of nutrition for us, we'd both like to enjoy broth by the mug/bowl 3-4 times per day.

                    Thanks again!
                    5'6" Female, 29 Years Old, 260/195/120

                    "Discipline is choosing between what you want NOW, and what you want MOST!"

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                    • #11
                      Sometimes I put a layer foil between the lid and the crock pot when I'm cooking something for a really really long time and I dont want to lose much moisture. It definitely increases the heat.

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                      • #12
                        our bone broth goes thus:

                        make chicken, eat chicken, make bone broth overnight in crock pot, strain off into jars, bokashi bin the bones (compost).

                        in between chicken-broth days, we get bones from butcher and make beef broth.

                        i add veggies to both for more flavor. it's just my preference.

                        we steam our veggies in broth, and then strain off that broth into cups. this is typically at breakfast. the other two meals tend to be raw veg (and I don't eat veg at breakfast, just eggs right now. sometimes fruit too.).

                        we go through a fair bit of broth each week. and DS likes it as a hot beverage now -- so sometimes we just reheat some for him.

                        as fall is coming, and we'll be doing more veggie soups (pumpkin, onion, etc), i'll be using the broth for that as well, which is while i'll be making beef broth in the off-days (non-chicken days).

                        we clean it out between each one.

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                        • #13
                          You shouldn't need 4 mugs per day.

                          If you don't eat grains or coffee you don't need nowhere as much calcium as the government recommends. Coffee and grains leech calcium from your body.
                          So when you consider the amount of grains the government tells us to eat, you should see that the calcium requirement would have to be really, really, reaaaally high.
                          But we eat mostly animal protein and vegetables, so we don't need as much calcium as those people.

                          Read here, this page explains it much better: WHFoods: calcium
                          • Vitamin D accelerates the absorption of calcium from the gastrointestinal tract.
                          • High consumption of potassium reduces the urinary excretion of calcium. (note added by AbtractPersona: so eat your dark leafy greens!)
                          • High intakes of sodium, caffeine, or protein cause an increase in the urinary excretion of calcium.
                          • Certain types of dietary fiber like the fiber found in wheat and oat bran, may interfere with calcium absorption by decreasing transit time (the amount of time it takes for digested foods to move through the intestines), limiting the amount of time during digestion for calcium to be absorbed. Dietary fiber also stimulates the proliferation of �friendly� bacteria in the gut, which bind calcium and make it less available for absorption.
                          • Phytic acid, found in whole grains, nuts, and legumes, can bind to calcium to form and insoluble complex, thereby decreasing the absorption of calcium.
                          • Oxalic acid, found in spinach, beets, celery, pecans, peanuts, tea and cocoa, can bind to calcium and form an insoluble complex that is excreted in the feces. While research studies confirm the ability of phytic acid and oxalic acid in foods to lower availability of calcium, the decrease in available calcium is relatively small. (note added by AsbtractPersona: you can cook the vegetables and soak the nuts in water, then this won't be a problem)
                          And Mark also has some posts about this on his blog.

                          I don't supplement calcium either, that would be dangerous, I'd get too much and it would interfere with other nutrients.
                          And I'm replying as someone who had super weak bones pre-primal, I couldn't even move without getting shooting pains all over my bones because they were so weak. After Primal my bones are super strong, even before I started making bone stock.
                          Last edited by abstractpersona; 03-04-2012, 11:28 AM.
                          My smartphone makes me about $100 per month
                          Updating my journal again after a 2 year break.

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                          • #14
                            Very enlightening. There are a couple issues I have concerns with, though:

                            1. We supplement Vitamin D (and magnesium), so we're on the right track there.
                            2. We have what I would consider moderate potassium. We eat a wide variety of veggies, fresh and local as much as possible. But we don't stuff ourselves silly of veggies, and I don't believe Grok ever did either. Problem with this?
                            3. We intake quite a bit of sodium (not lots, but we don't watch sodium either) and we do intake quite a bit of protein as others eating primal must as well.
                            4. We don't eat grains or legumes. But we do occasionally eat nuts & seeds (very limited) and specifically Macadamia Nuts. Do the phytate concerns exist with macadamia nuts as well?
                            5. So cooked spinach and celery, and brewed tea (?) won't be a concern, then? I enjoy green, oolong, and the occasional black tea... And herbal teas.

                            Thanks!
                            5'6" Female, 29 Years Old, 260/195/120

                            "Discipline is choosing between what you want NOW, and what you want MOST!"

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by GrokON View Post
                              2. We have what I would consider moderate potassium. We eat a wide variety of veggies, fresh and local as much as possible. But we don't stuff ourselves silly of veggies, and I don't believe Grok ever did either. Problem with this?
                              Problem is that vegetables from the grocery store today were picked many days ago and grown on poor soil, so they are not as nutritious as what Grok had. Since you're buying fresh and local vegetables, the vegetables are a lot more nutritious, so you're OK :-)

                              3. We intake quite a bit of sodium (not lots, but we don't watch sodium either) and we do intake quite a bit of protein as others eating primal must as well.
                              Sodium? From what? Since on Primal we don't eat processed foods (occasional bacon or sausage, eh), you shouldn't limit salt even if your doc put you in a salt restricted diet.
                              If anything, you should salt your dishes well.
                              Remember that the wisdom to "reduce salt intake" is because most Americans eat mostly processed things, rather than fresh foods. We don't have that problem.

                              4. We don't eat grains or legumes. But we do occasionally eat nuts & seeds (very limited) and specifically Macadamia Nuts. Do the phytate concerns exist with macadamia nuts as well?
                              Yes, you'd want to soak nuts in water overnight to get rid of them.
                              But if you eat like, a handful once a month or so, I don't think it's really that big a deal.

                              5. So cooked spinach and celery, and brewed tea (?) won't be a concern, then? I enjoy green, oolong, and the occasional black tea... And herbal teas.
                              Yes, you'll be ok with the cooked vegetables.
                              I don't know about the tea so hopefully someone else chimes in.
                              My smartphone makes me about $100 per month
                              Updating my journal again after a 2 year break.

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