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  • UK organic products very expensive!

    Hi all,

    I have started to eat primal and have so far realised that its a great way to live, but a very expensive lifestyle. I SO SO want to eat organic but the cost is huge. Are there any other ways to eat organic cheaply other than using big supermarkets (they do tend to be cheaper) for organic produce. Also raw milk, as great as it is, I just cannot bring myself to pay 20 for 5 pints every 5 days! I will definitely lose weight as I wont be able to afford to eat, lol.

    Are there any places in the UK that don't rip you off for Primal food?

    Kind regards

    Dave

  • #2
    Hi Dave,

    I'm UK based also and yes organic is invariably well expensive. However don't sweat it, the most important thing is that you ditch the grains and start eating meat, good fats, veggies and fruit. If you can afford organic and grass fed then that's champion, if you cant then don't sweat it until you get a payrise or win the lottery!

    Thinking outside the box you could also make friends with your local butcher or farm shop and do some wheeler dealing.

    Best of luck!

    Comment


    • #3
      Grow you own?

      Other than that it's really a question of how much you can afford, and how much you want to spend on food. Real food isn't all that cheap, organic or not. And certified organic has it's market, and isn't trivial to get, so it costs accordingly. If you live in the right place, you could see if there are any farmers or even people with too much produce from their own gardens that grow things to your standards. Farmers markets can also be good, but again the demand is there, prices can be fairly high, and sometimes there's more gifts than food.

      Of course you don't *have* to buy organic. It's better, but not necessary if you can't afford it. Some things have higher markups than others, and some things benefit from organic more than others. Mark makes some comments about that in his book, but there's information online as well.

      Comment


      • #4
        The fact you can get hold of raw milk means your primal needs are probably easier to meet than mine down in Kent. I haven't looked for a while but there's nowhere near me that does raw dairy. No sweat, some things like some veg, milk, cream cheese and mince meat I get organic from the supermarket, everything else is normal or free range at the very least. With meat that's non organic I tend to go for leaner cuts. Organic mince meat is very cheap and there's plenty of things you can do with that. I'd really like to eat more decent fresh fish but that's expensive unless I go fish for my own (nothing better than fresh out the sea mackerel on the BBQ!).

        Comment


        • #5
          Also if you're looking to grow your own but don't have the space, some people let you grow stuff on their spare plots of land. Have a look here:
          Landshare - connecting growers to people with land to share.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi Dave. I buy organic meat here in Sussex - go for the cheaper cuts (liver, kidney, shin, belly pork, skirt, mince, shoulder of lamb, breast of lamb) etc and get to know your butcher. Mine GIVES me fat to render down for lard - from organic cattle and pork. Also try chicken thighs / drumsticks and ask for carcasses for soup. Again, mine gives me those.

            I don't worry too much about organic veg - I buy weekly from a local market and the veg / fruit is squeaky fresh. Also local farmers markets - lovely fresh produce.

            An EXCELLENT source of cheap, usually organic, home grown veg and fruit is your local Women's Institute market - lots of small towns have one of these weekly. You need to get there early - they sell out!! The one I go to in Petworth is amazing.

            And if you are anywhere near the sea, fishermen sell fresh fish from the boat at ridiculously cheap prices - just what they have caught, obviously. I go to Worthing about once a month with a cool bag and those frozen blue things from the freezer, and buy skate wings / dover sole / sea bream etc very cheaply and freeze it.

            You can eat really well very reasonably priced - if you avoid supermarkets, big town centres etc. Having said that, markets in big towns are amazing, cheap, loads of stuff, huge variety of food. Chester, Coventry, Oxford, Soho (as in London), Newcastle on Tyne - all the big town markets I have been to haves amazed me.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by stevew View Post
              The fact you can get hold of raw milk means your primal needs are probably easier to meet than mine down in Kent. I haven't looked for a while but there's nowhere near me that does raw dairy. No sweat, some things like some veg, milk, cream cheese and mince meat I get organic from the supermarket, everything else is normal or free range at the very least. With meat that's non organic I tend to go for leaner cuts. Organic mince meat is very cheap and there's plenty of things you can do with that. I'd really like to eat more decent fresh fish but that's expensive unless I go fish for my own (nothing better than fresh out the sea mackerel on the BBQ!).
              I don't know where in Kent you are, but there is this

              KENT



              Winterdale Farm in Sevenoaks, Kent are now selling raw/unpasteurised milk. They were already making unpasteurised cheese, for which they have won awards.

              The cows are grass fed from April to Oct and then are in the barns during winter on grass and maize silage. They are selling raw milk on Saturdays from 11am until 1pm. They would prefer people to bring their own containers to reduce package waste etc but can supply them if necessary. The cost is 1.00 per litre

              For more information about the farm:
              Winterdale Cheesemakers - Home page



              SUSSEX



              Hollypark Organics sell organic raw goat milk via next day delivery. They also do raw cheese and, raw yogurt. In the production of their yogurt, they do not raise the milk temperature above blood temperature. The same with their cheese. This is the only source of raw yogurt I know of so, a very exciting find! They sell from the farm gate.

              Hollypark Organics, North Lane, Hastings, East Sussex, TN35 4LX
              01424 812229


              Unpasteurised / Raw Milk (Green Top - Farm Fresh) UK & Ireland | Natural Food Finder

              Producers and Products

              Growing Communities | Producers at Stoke Newington Farmers' Market

              And here is a link to a farm that will post it to you

              HOME

              Hope this helps!

              Comment


              • #8
                I get organic veg delivered weekly from Riverford , which isn't much cheaper than the supermarket. But because I then spend less on impulse buys I've actually ended up saving money - and it's fresher and nicer. I've never tried the meat, though. If you google organic vegetable delivery you can find a lot of alternatives.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Organic is basically a rip off in the UK. There is nothing more nutritious, or less dangerous, or better tasting about supermarket organic vegetables than non organic, yet you'll get charged twice the price. Maybe if you can source some quality local, organic produce there might be a benefit. If food quality if your priority, in meat, you should be aiming for 100% grass fed or outdoor reared. You will have to buy that online, its cheaper in bulk. Quality of eggs doesn't differ much, again aim for free range first and foremost. Dairy is in the same place as meat.

                  Obvious go for cheaper cuts as well.
                  Last edited by AMonkey; 03-01-2012, 11:48 AM.
                  http://lifemutt.blogspot.sg/ - Gaming, Food Reviews and Life in Singapore

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by breadsauce View Post
                    I don't know where in Kent you are, but there is this

                    KENT



                    Winterdale Farm in Sevenoaks, Kent are now selling raw/unpasteurised milk. They were already making unpasteurised cheese, for which they have won awards.

                    The cows are grass fed from April to Oct and then are in the barns during winter on grass and maize silage. They are selling raw milk on Saturdays from 11am until 1pm. They would prefer people to bring their own containers to reduce package waste etc but can supply them if necessary. The cost is 1.00 per litre

                    For more information about the farm:
                    Winterdale Cheesemakers - Home page



                    SUSSEX



                    Hollypark Organics sell organic raw goat milk via next day delivery. They also do raw cheese and, raw yogurt. In the production of their yogurt, they do not raise the milk temperature above blood temperature. The same with their cheese. This is the only source of raw yogurt I know of so, a very exciting find! They sell from the farm gate.

                    Hollypark Organics, North Lane, Hastings, East Sussex, TN35 4LX
                    01424 812229


                    Unpasteurised / Raw Milk (Green Top - Farm Fresh) UK & Ireland | Natural Food Finder

                    Producers and Products

                    Growing Communities | Producers at Stoke Newington Farmers' Market

                    And here is a link to a farm that will post it to you

                    HOME

                    Hope this helps!
                    Thanks breadsauce! The one in Sussex sounds good and not to far away from where my parents are. Not somewhere I can make a regular visit to but I might pop in and see them on my next family visit.

                    There was a decent farm shop that opened near me but they were open only at odd times and not every day. As a result they didn't get a lot of business and closed down. I think part of the problem is were accustomed to being able to food shop whenever we like. I'm guilty of that too and have found myself on a few occasions wondering around Tesco's late at night. The food box schemes might be something I'll look into again.

                    For venison I've heard good things about this place: Welcome - Highland Game - Purveyors of Fine Foods - Venison Direct to Your Door - Scotland, UK I know someone who's ordered a few boxes from them in the past and said the meat is really tasty and seems good value.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by stevew View Post
                      Thanks breadsauce! The one in Sussex sounds good and not to far away from where my parents are. Not somewhere I can make a regular visit to but I might pop in and see them on my next family visit.

                      There was a decent farm shop that opened near me but they were open only at odd times and not every day. As a result they didn't get a lot of business and closed down. I think part of the problem is were accustomed to being able to food shop whenever we like. I'm guilty of that too and have found myself on a few occasions wondering around Tesco's late at night. The food box schemes might be something I'll look into again.

                      For venison I've heard good things about this place: Welcome - Highland Game - Purveyors of Fine Foods - Venison Direct to Your Door - Scotland, UK I know someone who's ordered a few boxes from them in the past and said the meat is really tasty and seems good value.
                      Stevew, raw milk freezes well - I buy five or six litres, take some out of each (so they don't expand and burst in the freezer) then freeze them.

                      Thanks for the venison link - looks great! I shall get an order in for burgers, mince and a roe deer leg!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        You could see if there are any farm shops near you. Near me there is a farm that supplies eggs for the Happy Egg company, buying direct from them you get the same quality of eggs but cheaper than in the supermarkets and naturally fresher too.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Organic in Supermarkets like Tesco is a complete rip off. Try farmers markets or local box delivery systems. Alternatively as Sleepyroots says, grow your own. We are getting into the growing season and I GUARANTEE that you have not tasted tomatoes or peas as good as when you pull them off the plant. You can buy grown on seedlings so you don't even have to bother with greenhouses etc. just a warm sunny place to grow, and for your toms that might just be your kitchen window ledge!
                          Perseverance is not a long race; it is many short races one after the other.
                          Walter Elliot

                          I am a horse for a single harness, not cut out for tandem or teamwork; for well I know that in order to attain any definite goal, it is imperative that one person do the thinking and the commanding. Albert Einstein

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Organic in the supermarket does seem to be horribly expensive so we only buy it for things where we can taste the difference and leafy greens as I think they soak up the pesticides a lot.

                            For meat, we tried getting local farm organic meat but it was very expensive so we now buy most of our meat non-organic but we pop by the farm shop every so often to pick things up. They do half a lamb for 65 which doesn't seem too bad so we get those and freeze them.

                            Eggs we always buy free range and organic where possible. In terms of milk, we don't drink much so we don't worry about it.

                            We generally focus on getting primal foods at the best quality that we can source and afford, but we don't stress if that doesnt mean fully organic or grass-fed. I tend to be of the view that most cattle in the UK is largely grass fed, or at least partially grass fed unlike the states. That's maybe a bit naive but I try not to worry about it anyway.

                            Sugar is my nicotine...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Nice to read a thread that "talks british" at me, lol!! I've only just found the Primal UK Group on here so if you haven't found it yet then you should join so that we can talk a bit more local at times!! Think there's a meet trying to be organised too!!

                              Organic is sooooo expensive!! I saw an article on Countryfile that said Organic sales have plummeted in recent years and it's forcing a lot of farmers to go back to non-organic methods again ... they think a lot of it was a result of people now buying more "moral friendly" - eg free range chickens, sensibly caught fish, fairtrade etc.

                              I buy organic if it's on special or not too far away from the price of non-O for a particular item but on the whole I buy "normal" meat and veg. Buy organic milk as don't use enough for the extra bit to matter - especially when I read how non-O cows are treated Eggs I'll always try to buy organic or Sainsbury's do "woodland eggs" where the chickens roam free and they're cheaper!! Thinking these are probably better than organic cos surely they're just fed organic corn??!! I think the difference in a good quality egg is amazing - for a start the shell is soooo much harder, the yolk more yellow and they're more 'solid' when plopped in the frying pan!

                              I buy a lot of my "out there" products from Goodness Direct (eg coconut oil, flour, quality coconut milk, xylitol etc).

                              There is certainly a whole host of things to learn and research on this, that's for sure!!! But we'll all get there together!!

                              H x
                              An English girl who's been on lots of different diets, weight gone up and down but always been a naturalist at heart and have always wondered why "Conventional Wisdom" diets don't allow you to eat red meat and nuts - that are purely natural things?! So feel I've found my niche in the PB/Paleo Lifestyle and really want to make this my way of life for good!!!

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