Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Magnesium and Potassium rich foods

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Magnesium and Potassium rich foods

    I've been tracking my vitamin and mineral intake for a few weeks, and whilst I'm getting plenty of most things without supplementation, I just can't seem to get anywhere near the recommended amount of magnesium and potassium. Anyone know any good whole food sources for these minerals? Thanks.
    My Journal: Englishman In Oz, Skinny to Muscle in a Primal Way

  • #2
    I think magnesium is one of the minerals that are really hard to get now that most of the soil is fairly depleted.

    Hate to say it, but I just suck it up and supplement because I get migraines when I don't get my 1000mg every day.
    Durp.

    Comment


    • #3
      How about an epsom salt bath? I take a salt bath at least once a week. I use a mixture of Himalayan Sea Salt and cheaper store brand epsom salt. I also do a neti pot wash of my sinuses once a week with the Himalayan Salt. I think your skin and sinuses must be a great way to absorb magnesium and other minerals into your body.

      Comment


      • #4
        I've been wondering the same.I went to get a general check up and some blood work today just to be told that my local health center "doesn't check vitamin levels" and that "Nobody actually has a vitamin deficiencies,except for maybe vitamin D".At that point I asked how much vitamin D I should take and the guy responded with "I have people on anything from 800 iu to 50,000 iu,so pick a number between those and you'll be fine.You could take a gram of it a day and be ok.".The only valuable information I got was that my blood pressure is 118/86,which is better than it was pre-paleo.
        Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who has said it, no matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own experience.

        In the mind of the beginner, there are many possibilities; in the mind of the expert, there are few.


        I've shaken hands with a raccoon and lived to tell the tale

        SW: 220- 225 pounds at the beginning of January
        CW: 180 pounds

        Goals for 2012: Lose a bit more fat and start a serious muscle and strength routine

        Comment


        • #5
          I am unable to get enough magnesium or potassium from diet alone. Even adding in lots of foods, I was still having muscle cramping and weakness - I use a topical magnesium brine and an oral potassium supplement daily.

          Some of the top food for potassium: tomatoes, green beans, peas, dates, halibut, salmon, and spinach.

          Magnesium is harder to gauge because estimates are off as soil is depleted, but halibut, spinach, okra, pumpkin and pumpkin seeds, cocoa powers, and brazil nuts are decent sources.
          Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

          http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Englishman in Oz View Post
            I've been tracking my vitamin and mineral intake for a few weeks, and whilst I'm getting plenty of most things without supplementation, I just can't seem to get anywhere near the recommended amount of magnesium and potassium. Anyone know any good whole food sources for these minerals? Thanks.
            Spinach is high in magnesium, potassium, and calcium. It's now a staple of my diet: curried (with a fair amount of butter and full-fat yogurt) and sauteed with butter, bacon grease, garlic, ginger, and toasted pine nuts. In the U.S. there's a tomato-based juice called V8. The low-sodium version has 800 mg of potassium/cup Also, I have ground chia seed in my daily meatloaf. The chia seed soaks up a lot of liquid, helping to bind the loaf and has magnesium and potassium. If I eat a 3.5 oz serving of meatloaf, 1 C of spinach and 2 C of low-sodium V8 in a day, I can eat my ration of magnesium and potassium. If I don't, then I supplement.

            Comment


            • #7
              I eat a log of green leafy vegetables, cocoa powder, salmon, shrimp, leeks, sweet potato and occasional almonds which are all good sources of magnesium. As long as I get enough sodium and potassium (both much easier to obtain) I do not need to supplement magnesium. However, I'd find it difficult to ensure I get enough magnesium if I was consuming much less than 2000 calories a day. It's definitely worth trying supplementation if you are in doubt.

              As long you eat plenty of vegetables and fruit, you are unlikely to become potassium deficient, as long as you get enough sodium. So ensure you eat enough salt, as a primal diet is usually naturally low in sodium. If you don't, your body will sweat potassium and magnesium in place of sodium.
              F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by shiliangtu
                I also do a neti pot wash of my sinuses once a week with the Himalayan Salt. I think your skin and sinuses must be a great way to absorb magnesium and other minerals into your body
                Great way to protect yourself against colds as well!!!!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Potassium is a very significant body mineral, important to both cellular and electrical function. Most non-grain foods have potassium. Fruits,veggies,nuts, seeds, fish etc. Sweet potatoes, avocado, salmon, tuna have a lot Potassium.
                  ---------------------------------
                  isabel de los rios reviewIsabel De Los Rios | Beyond Diet

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by acohn View Post
                    Spinach is high in magnesium, potassium, and calcium. It's now a staple of my diet: curried (with a fair amount of butter and full-fat yogurt) and sauteed with butter, bacon grease, garlic, ginger, and toasted pine nuts. In the U.S. there's a tomato-based juice called V8. The low-sodium version has 800 mg of potassium/cup Also, I have ground chia seed in my daily meatloaf. The chia seed soaks up a lot of liquid, helping to bind the loaf and has magnesium and potassium. If I eat a 3.5 oz serving of meatloaf, 1 C of spinach and 2 C of low-sodium V8 in a day, I can eat my ration of magnesium and potassium. If I don't, then I supplement.
                    What a clever use for chia seeds! Thank you for that. And now I have a hankering for some spinach curry.
                    Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Englishman in Oz View Post
                      I've been tracking my vitamin and mineral intake for a few weeks, and whilst I'm getting plenty of most things without supplementation, I just can't seem to get anywhere near the recommended amount of magnesium and potassium. Anyone know any good whole food sources for these minerals? Thanks.
                      Pottasium usually just means eat more vegetables. Bieler Broth (recipes online) is intended to give a good belt of the stuff. You could take a few drops of ConcenTrace in water, if it's of concern:

                      Amazon.co.uk: concentrace

                      Magnesium is harder because modern farming methods, and specifically NPK fertilizers, deplete it in soil. Lots on that issue and others here:

                      Magnificent Magnesium - Weston A Price Foundation

                      Magnesium is probably one of the very few nutrients that are best supplemented. (The latest edition of The Paleo Diet advises to avoid supplements on the whole, apart from a few narrowly targeted ones, and that seems to be in line with the latest research.)

                      The easiest thing to do is to take it in the form of a Naturalcalm drink made up from powder:

                      Natural Calm Magnesium Supplements UK by Peter Gillham's Natural Vitality - Feel Better

                      In general, you have to wonder how reliable those figures that a tool like Fitday spits out are anyway. For example, it counts beta-carotene as vitamin A -- which it is not. It's a precursor to A, and whether you can convert it in your body or not -- many can't -- depends on a number of factors. Then again, Fitday is going to give figures for minerals in whole grains. Now those are there, but (as the "Conventional Wisdom" misses) they're not particularly bioavailable, since they're bound up in phytate. And then again, if you add an orange to your day's food, Fitday will add a figure for vitamin C. However, tests on supermarket produce have turned up oranges in stores that have had no detectable vitamin C in them at all. (They'd probably been flown in from halfway across the globe and kept in storage for an extended period.)

                      When you come down to it, how much of any mineral or vitamin is in some particular piece of produce? Who knows? How long's a piece of string? It depends on the soil it was grown in, how it was fertilized, when it was picked, and how long it's been in storage. A tool like Fitday is only giving you a notional figure.

                      The current thinking seems to be: If you're eating a wide range, and adequate quantities, of meat, fish, vegetables, and fruit (preferring the best quality that availability and budget allows), adding a spoonful of a good fat here and there, eating offal occasionally (and perhaps making an drinking bone-broth) then you're probably OK for nutrients and you're probably better not to supplement.

                      However, if you can't get out in the sun, some supplementation with D3 is going to be necessary. And if you can't get, or don't like, oily fish some supplementation with fish oil. Unless an individual has some specific condition or need, those two are probably about it. Magnesium is probably about the only other nutrient that one might want to supplement -- unless you happen o live in an area where there's shedloads of it in the water, owing to the underlying geology or something.

                      Oh, if you prefer a food source for the D3, you could use the naturally fermented cod liver oil, Blue Ice:

                      http://www.red23.co.uk/Green-Pasture_m_18.html

                      A teaspoon of that a day should be ample to get vitamin D levels up, and it supplies A as well.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I use supplement pills in order to get enough magnesium. I've heard that most people are deficient of it.
                        As far as potassium goes, an avocado has plenty (and it tastes pretty awesome too).

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Also, if you don't mind the trouble of preparing foods, have a good solid digestive system and are flexible with foods, you can get both from lentils and beans.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            i used to be all militant about not taking supplements. then i gave that up, cause - i feel and lift a whole helluva lot better if i take magnesium before bed. experience trumps my stubborn attitude.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I've heard citrus fruit juices and pineapple juice both have good amounts of potassium.
                              "Don't waste your time, or time will waste you."

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X