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High insulin levels and low blood glucose

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  • High insulin levels and low blood glucose

    What happens in this case? I hear a lot about how chronically high amount of glucose AND high insulin levels lead to insulin resistance, but what if you don't have any blood sugar going on? Does the insulin just die back down?
    My chocolatey Primal journey

    Unusual food recipes (plus chocolate) blog

  • #2
    Originally posted by sakura_girl View Post
    What happens in this case? I hear a lot about how chronically high amount of glucose AND high insulin levels lead to insulin resistance, but what if you don't have any blood sugar going on? Does the insulin just die back down?
    If your blood glucose is low, your body does not produce too much insulin. Insulin stays low.

    If your body were to produce too much insulin your blood glucose level would just keep dropping until you felt hypoglycemic and eventually you would go into a coma and die.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by sakura_girl View Post
      What happens in this case? I hear a lot about how chronically high amount of glucose AND high insulin levels lead to insulin resistance, but what if you don't have any blood sugar going on? Does the insulin just die back down?
      If you have high insulin levels and normal glucose levels it can mean that, at this moment, the amount of insulin being produced is enough to shuttle glucose out of the bloodstream. It also means that some insulin resistance is happening because the amount of insulin needed to keep BGL in check is high.

      Over time the possibility exists that increasing insulin levels and increasing resistance can lead to the body's inability to shuttle glucose from the blood. If this happens, BGL will rise and can lead to diabetes.

      Case in point-- my sister has stellar fasting BGL. She also has out of range high fasting insulin levels.. This tells me that her body is producing high amounts of insulin to clear the glucose and keep it within normal limits. The over production of insulin strains the pancreas and may damage beta cells-impacting insulin production. Her climbing Hb1ac levels indicate that her glucose control is slipping.

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      • #4
        Aw man. So every time I eat cheese without some carbs, I am setting myself up for diabetes?
        My chocolatey Primal journey

        Unusual food recipes (plus chocolate) blog

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        • #5
          Originally posted by sakura_girl View Post
          Aw man. So every time I eat cheese without some carbs, I am setting myself up for diabetes?
          I'm confused. Why do you think cheese will raise BGL/lead to diabetes and why do you think adding carbs will improve the situation? Cheese, for me, does not raise BGL because it is high fat with protein and lower carbs.

          I think the more important questions are:
          Do you know your fasting BGL, fasting insulin and postprandial BGL after eating questionable foods (one's you think raise glucose levels).

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          • #6
            Cheese is insulinogenic, so it raises the amount of insulin. But if I don't eat any glucose with the cheese, the elevated insulin is there so don't my cells have to get more insulin resistant to combat this problem?
            My chocolatey Primal journey

            Unusual food recipes (plus chocolate) blog

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            • #7
              Originally posted by sakura_girl View Post
              Cheese is insulinogenic, so it raises the amount of insulin. But if I don't eat any glucose with the cheese, the elevated insulin is there so don't my cells have to get more insulin resistant to combat this problem?
              All foods are insulinogenic. We release some amount of insulin every time we eat. I think the impact dairy has on insulin release varies from person to person. Dairy can also cause weight loss stalls in some people.. YMMV.

              From Mark--"With dairy, it’s the protein plus the carbs that are responsible for the large insulin release.
              Insulin is needed to shuttle nutrients into cells. It’s chronically elevated insulin and insulin resistance –-you know, the hallmarks of metabolic syndrome – that are the problem."
              On Dairy and Insulin | Mark's Daily Apple

              So if it's the protein and carbs, found in cheese, that cause the large insulin release, when dairy/cheese is eaten, then adding carbs/more glucose will only increase the insulin need.

              Again I ask:
              Do you know your:
              1. Fasting BGL
              2. Fasting insulin
              3. How you react to foods ingested (measured by postprandial BGL levels)
              4. What your average BGL is over a 3 month period (measured by HbA1c)

              Knowing these things helped me make better food choices, lower my FBGL and fasting insulin, and avoid diabetes- a disease that runs rampant in my family. And, I freely ate cheese during this time.

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              • #8
                So zero carb cheese such as hard cheeses cause insulin release? Hmmm, I never knew that. How does that happen? Does the body react to the no carb content in a special way that it does not to say meat?

                Interesting!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by marcadav View Post
                  All foods are insulinogenic. We release some amount of insulin every time we eat. I think the impact dairy has on insulin release varies from person to person. Dairy can also cause weight loss stalls in some people.. YMMV.

                  Knowing these things helped me make better food choices, lower my FBGL and fasting insulin, and avoid diabetes- a disease that runs rampant in my family. And, I freely ate cheese during this time.
                  I understand your point. I just really like cheese and am looking for a reason to eat it as opposed to not eating it by figuring out why it stalls some people.

                  I'm too poor and have no insurance coverage on blood sample testing. Will look into that later on though! Good thing diabetes doesn't run in my family, and I didn't eat that many carbs even before primal, so don't have to worry about diabetes...but just wondering if the insulin response is the reason why I can't eat cheese XD
                  My chocolatey Primal journey

                  Unusual food recipes (plus chocolate) blog

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                  • #10
                    Low-lactose cheese doesn't stall people - milk and yoghurt tend to stall people with insulin resistance doing very low carb because lactose causes a bigger insulin spike than glucose gram for gram.

                    I've lost 35 lbs eating at least 150 g of cheese a day. I've gained muscle faster than I intended on it! There's a lot more to insulin than blood glucose control. It promotes anabolic processes such as muscle repair and growth. Provided that muscle cells are insulin sensitive, they will take up enough glucose as well as essential fatty acids and amino acids from the blood stream for growth and repair on an insulin spike. Dairy is obviously one of the best anabolic foods as it's fed to rapidly growing baby mammals. Hence the popularity of whey and cottage cheese in the body-building world.

                    One of the best things you can do for blood glucose control and insulin sensitivity is get plenty of exercise. I'd say it's essential. Then whenever you eat glucose, most of it will be taken up rapidly by muscle cells to replenish glycogen stores, and there's no danger of it being turned to fat.
                    Last edited by paleo-bunny; 02-22-2012, 03:49 AM. Reason: clarification
                    F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by paleo-bunny View Post
                      Low-lactose cheese doesn't stall people - milk and yoghurt tend to stall people with insulin resistance doing very low carb because lactose causes a bigger insulin spike than glucose gram for gram.

                      I've lost 35 lbs eating at least 150 g of cheese a day. I've gained muscle faster than I intended on it! There's a lot more to insulin than blood glucose control. It promotes anabolic processes such as muscle repair and growth. Provided that muscle cells are insulin sensitive, they will take up enough glucose as well as essential fatty acids and amino acids from the blood stream for growth and repair on an insulin spike. Dairy is obviously one of the best anabolic foods as it's fed to rapidly growing baby mammals. Hence the popularity of whey and cottage cheese in the body-building world.

                      One of the best things you can do for blood glucose control and insulin sensitivity is get plenty of exercise. I'd say it's essential. Then whenever you eat glucose, most of it will be taken up rapidly by muscle cells to replenish glycogen stores, and there's no danger of it being turned to fat.
                      Oh. With everybody's complaints on dairy, I was thinking more of the cheese/cream kind. Well seeing that I eliminated cheeses for nearly a month and didn't really have any results, I guess I should be safe to add that back in, especially after exercise Thanks!
                      My chocolatey Primal journey

                      Unusual food recipes (plus chocolate) blog

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by sakura_girl View Post
                        Oh. With everybody's complaints on dairy, I was thinking more of the cheese/cream kind. Well seeing that I eliminated cheeses for nearly a month and didn't really have any results, I guess I should be safe to add that back in, especially after exercise Thanks!
                        A lot of people lump all dairy together without considering different types. That's about as meaningful as lumping all types of meat product together and making a generalisation about them.

                        I only eat goats and sheeps cheeses. They are generally the best tolerated so I recommend you try them if you haven't already.

                        A lot of people recommend that your post-workout meal should be low fat if you want to optimise muscle gain - so that's something to consider. I eat full fat cheese in post-workout meals about 40% of the time and have gained plenty of muscle.

                        Anyway, good luck with adding them back in. I hope it works for you.
                        F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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