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Can eating too much protein cause gout?

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  • Can eating too much protein cause gout?

    Some people tell me that eating too much protein, such as meat, will cause gout. As far as I know, no one that I know that eats a Paleo diet has had trouble with gout. Has anyone had symptoms of gout when eating a lot of protein? I haven't.

  • #2
    I had gout back when I was doing Atkins. Serioously painful. In that case, I wasn't drinking enough water and there was a ton of uric acid being cleaned out of my system. I started drinking more and it went away.

    Fast forward about 10 years and I fully expected the same thing when I started eating Primal. Never happened, and I hadn't upped my water intake..

    It's my understanding that eating Primal doesn't cause gout. Eating protein, especially meat, gets blamed for a world of hurt that has nothing to do with it. Google "gout" and "paleo" together and you'll see what I mean. Scroll past the militant vegan sites and you'll find actual research saying it's just not true.
    Durp.

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    • #3
      My dad thinks his gout flares are from pork, my brother thinks his own gout is from red meat and alcohol. But both consume lots of grains and sugars.

      There was something floating around here a long time ago that the meat is only an issue in the presence of lots of sugar or especially high fructose corn syrup.
      Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

      http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

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      • #4
        Yes, kidney function is compromised by excess sugars that make it harder to excrete uric acid. Excess sugars aren't a problem on primal. Nor is excess alcohol.
        F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by paleo-bunny View Post
          Yes, kidney function is compromised by excess sugars that make it harder to excrete uric acid. Excess sugars aren't a problem on primal. Nor is excess alcohol.
          Offtopic, do you know if the sugar/kidney function relationship has an impact the formation on calcium oxalate kidney stones?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by GrokDoll View Post
            Offtopic, do you know if the sugar/kidney function relationship has an impact the formation on calcium oxalate kidney stones?
            Oooh....I would love to know the answer to this as well. I do NOT like kidney stones.
            Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

            http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

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            • #7
              I've suffered from both kidney stones and gout prior to becoming paleo/primal. I finally nailed mine down to excessive HFCS. Haven't had any problems with either since eliminating corn syrup and refined sugars.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by GrokDoll View Post
                Offtopic, do you know if the sugar/kidney function relationship has an impact the formation on calcium oxalate kidney stones?
                I would expect so, and VenDexter obviously has some experience of that.

                Avoid sugar!
                F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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                • #9
                  I have had two episodes of gout. Both times I pigged out on pastachios the day before the flair up. I remember wondering if the large amount I ate had anything to do with it the first time. It became quite clear to me the second time that it most definitely did. I like them, but not that much!!

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                  • #10
                    I think there are certain foods like asparagus that gout sufferers have to watch out for, but I've always heard it's excess drinking that makes it really bad. The one gout sufferer I know is a heavy drinker (and is obese).
                    If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

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                    • #11
                      A coworker told me that he had gout as a kid from pork that was undercooked. Pork should be cooked at 350 at all times.

                      It's the old research problem of running controls. How do we know that gout is caused by the meat itself, and that it's not the addtives, or improper cooking, or the corn-fed aspect of the meat? Or that it's something else -- like too much protein replacing some other nutrient, and now it's a nutrient deficiency? Or that it's a combination?
                      5'0" female, 45 years old. Started Primal October 31, 2011, at a skinny fat 111.5 lbs. Low weight: 99.5 lb on a fast. Gained back to 115(!) on SAD chocolate, potato chips, and stress. Currently 111.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by GrokDoll View Post
                        Offtopic, do you know if the sugar/kidney function relationship has an impact the formation on calcium oxalate kidney stones?
                        The human body has a PH balance, with homeostasis being slightly basic...Most of us, however, have an acidic diet. Alkaline (basic) foods that you put in your body include fruits and veggies. Foods that our bodies treat as acidic include animal proteins, dairy, grains, processed sugars, caffeine, etc. If your diet is acidic (which 98% of Americans are), your body tries to return to the Base-side homestasis by drawing the most readily available acid out of your body, which just happens to be calcium in your bones. If you are acidic enough that your kidneys won't handle the load well, the excess calcium that can't be excreted through the urine will linger in the kidneys and over time will form into a solid deposit, a la kidney stones. This bodily response to excess acid is also why Americans consume the most dairy but also have the highest rates of osteoporosis in the world.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by codered5 View Post
                          The human body has a PH balance, with homeostasis being slightly basic...Most of us, however, have an acidic diet. Alkaline (basic) foods that you put in your body include fruits and veggies. Foods that our bodies treat as acidic include animal proteins, dairy, grains, processed sugars, caffeine, etc. If your diet is acidic (which 98% of Americans are), your body tries to return to the Base-side homestasis by drawing the most readily available acid out of your body, which just happens to be calcium in your bones. If you are acidic enough that your kidneys won't handle the load well, the excess calcium that can't be excreted through the urine will linger in the kidneys and over time will form into a solid deposit, a la kidney stones. This bodily response to excess acid is also why Americans consume the most dairy but also have the highest rates of osteoporosis in the world.
                          Confused If calcium is an acid, then why is it used as an antacid in Tums and Maalox? We have hard water here~ mostly caused by calcium~ it's not acid~ in fact, it's extremely alkaline.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Nady View Post
                            Confused If calcium is an acid, then why is it used as an antacid in Tums and Maalox? We have hard water here~ mostly caused by calcium~ it's not acid~ in fact, it's extremely alkaline.
                            Calcium carbonate in the bones is an antacid. Hence the body releases it to neutralise excess acid in the body.
                            F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by paleo-bunny View Post
                              Calcium carbonate in the bones is an antacid. Hence the body releases it to neutralise excess acid in the body.
                              Well, that makes sense! Don't understand why codered5 said it was an acid~ maybe should have said 'antacid'?

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