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Eating primal with conventional meat

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  • Eating primal with conventional meat



    I've been reading this site for quite a while but never actually tried putting things into practice. I've been plagued by all sorts of digestive troubles, low energy, aches and pains, and I want to do what I can to deal with these.


    I'm very interested on cutting out the majority of carbs, I've always been curious but I was always scared of having a high fat intake. But lately I've been reading up a lot more on this and no longer really believe that fat is to be feared.


    Anyways, my question is, am I better off eating less meat if I can't afford to get organic/grass-fed? The reality is that if I'm going to eat this way, I'm going to be eating bacon, meat, fish, butter from the grocery store. Grass-fed is accessible by ordering online but it just isn't affordable for me.


    What do you all think. Is this worth trying if I will be using less clean sources of protein?


    Thanks for the feedback,

    Brian


  • #2
    1



    GREAT question... and I'd like to hear Mark's take on it. He probably has and it's in some archive somewhere... you might just try a simple search.


    I am kind of in the same boat, money is a real issue but I talked to the health food store guy and he says almost ALL meat you get is grass-fed since NO rancher could afford to grain-feed their cattle. I guess the difference is if the farm is ORGANIC, meaning the fields the cows graze in are chemical free. I'm afraid there's a lot of blue smoke and mirrors in the food industry and who REALLY knows?


    ...and does it REALLY make a difference?

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    • #3
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      If you go for grocery store meats, get the leanest type that you can, since the majority of the harmful stuff gets trapped in the fat. Also, look for the lowest sodium meats as well. You would also be doing good to look for a butcher, deli, or meat market in your area that does not put additives in their meats to increase their weight like Wal-Mart does.

      Ism's in my opinion are not good. A person should not believe in an -ism, he should believe in himself. I quote John Lennon, "I don't believe in Beatles, I just believe in me."--Ferris Bueller, 1986
      Check me out @ my blog: Retrospective Caveman
      I set up a Facebook Group for all those who are eating and living Paleo/Primal

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      • #4
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        AFAIK, if you go for lean meat you'll be okay, then add back in good fats eg avocado, organic butter, coconut oil.....

        (By "good fat" I mean "junk-free")

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        • #5
          1



          I think about the same thing all the time. I am using some organic meat (ground beef and bacon is all I can find in my town) but I cant afford the really good stuff for right now. I am still doing this because I really believe there will be a great health benefits, even if it is not ideal. I do plan on eventually buying higher quality meat when I can afford it.


          I am interested to see what others say.

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          • #6
            1



            Im wondering about this too. I have access to good organic and grass fed beef, organic chicken, etc. But I'm a student and its getting a bit pricey for me and my hubby to eat this way. However, i figure Im saving a lot of money in the long run in being healthy (wont have to pay for medications, surgeries, etc in the future). I justify my grocery bill as an investment. But I would like to know if there is THAT big of difference...

            Natural Selection: http://ichoosenaturalselection.wordpress.com

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            • #7
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              I see "standard" meat as being a significantly different product than the 100% grass-fed/humanely raised stuff you buy at co-ops and from farmers.


              @chazglen: I'm really surprised by what you were told. My understanding is that a good majority of cattle are started on grass, but then switched to corn/grain in the last month or so before butchering. This basically ruins the Omega-3/Omega-6 balance and is what makes non-organic meat cheap and unhealthy. That's why you have to find "100% grass-fed" or "grass-finished" beef. See Mark's explanation here: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/concentrated-animal-feeding-operations.


              There's also the whole hormone and antibiotics issue as well, not to mention how sad these animal's lives are. If CAFO meat is the only step you can see yourself taking into Primal, I would proceed, but hope you'll change your mind down the road. Eating the primal way has caused me to have a much deeper appreciation of the animals, land, and farmers that produce food in the most healthful and sustainable ways. I think if you did some further research into the issue you'd come to the same conclusion too.

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              • #8
                1



                Don't forget fish!


                I go to WalMart and buy a large, 1 lb. wild-caught salmon fillet, certified sustainably fished, for $7. (I found the same item at a regional supermarket here for $17)


                PWG

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                • #9
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                  And wild caught herring/anchovies and sardines are just shy of $2 a can. Cans/BPA issue aside.

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                  • #10
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                    I'm not really sure what to believe about the whole hormones/antibiotics/pesticides thing. Right now I am a little hesitstant to dive in head first with the conventional animal products thing. My eggs are organic and so I my whey and I get a lot of fats from coconut oil/shredded coconut and olive oil, flax, chia, pumpkin seeds, avocados, but these aren't really nutritious fats like meat. I eat a lot of sardines and salmon and take chlorella to counteract the small amounts of mercury. Then I eat a fair amount of chicken and beef, about 400 calories a day from either one of those. As far as the antibiotics are concerned, I'm not overly concerned about those. The issue is that you can possibly acquire bacteria that are antibiotic resistant, so I take probiotics; I would take probiotics anyway. I'm not really concerned about the pesticides, as chlorella really is a fantastic way to counteract that sort of thing. I generally treat my liver very well and use milk thistle, dandelion and burdock intermittently.


                    Our bodies are generally very resilient and very good at eliminating harmful things so long as we provide them adequate nutrition and support, but I still worry a bit about this sort of stuff. I suppose I could add a little more organic meat.

                    Stabbing conventional wisdom in its face.

                    Anyone who wants to talk nutrition should PM me!

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                    • #11
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                      I don

                      t want to know the answer. I can't afford to do organic meat- so please do not crush me

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                      • #12
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                        You will be okay

                        It's gotta be better than bread and cake!

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                        • #13
                          1



                          Investigate the following:


                          1. CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) for local, organic vegetables and fruits. Do a google search.

                          2. Farmer's markets

                          3. Food coops where you get a discount for labor. My local coop will give you a 25% discount for 4 hours/week of labor.

                          4. Cooperative 'cowsharing': once you find a local, grass-based farmer (from the website www.eatwild.com) you can gather like-minded people together and get a volume discount or a cow-sharing discount. (My local Crossfit afffiliate has a buy club from a local farm.)


                          If you can't do these things, by all means, try to stick to supermarket meats that are labeled "antibiotic and hormone-free." They cost a tad more, but not that much. My oncologist friends tell their patients with hormone-sensitive tumors not to eat conventional meat. And these are completely mainstream doctors!


                          PWG

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                          • #14
                            1



                            Eating primal and even low carb doesn't mean you have to consume a lot of animal products. I maybe have a tin or two of sardines a day (150-300 calories), plus 2 eggs, with the rest of my calories coming from nuts and seeds, avocados, coconut, olive oil, dark chocolate, and fruits and vegetables. I would rather go vegan again than eat conventional meat from a factory farm. The conditions the animals face can be truly horrifying, not to mention the environmental impact.

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                            • #15
                              1



                              @Chazglen, did you mean what you wrote? Cattle typically only feed on grass for a short period of time, then get shuttled to the feed lot to get fat off grains and slautered as soon as possible. So, I guess in all technicality all cattle is "grass-fed"... At some point, and mostly where it matters least.


                              I buy conventional meat but don't feel good about it. Fortunately, my roommate just got in 30lbs of quality steak, chicken and beef to sustain us for the rest of the semester. In the meantime, I usually rely on quality whole fryers at Whole Foods (Only about 1.99 a pound..and DELICIOUS!) and get anything without antibiotics/hormones when on sale. Try to get high quality as MUCH as possible. . .Personally, I'd suggest getting better quality MEAT than organic vegetables.


                              If you're not getting the fancy schmancy stuff, at least invest in an awesome omega-3 supplement (at LEAST 1g a day is what I'm hearing,) and a multivitamin to make up for a lack of nutrients due to lower quality foods. Good LUCK!


                              And never underestimate the power of cheap paleo food sources. Canned tuna, protein powder, eggs. All good!

                              On a mission to help others master movement, build unbreakable strength, & eat MORE food (can't beat that.) Weekly fitness, health & nutrition articles at indulgentfitness.com.

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