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Cage free vs regular eggs?

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  • Cage free vs regular eggs?

    I've heard that cage free eggs are better for you than regular eggs. What are the health reasons for this? What is detrimental about eating regular eggs? Thanks.

  • #2
    Caged hens don't produce good eggs, because they don't live good lives. That said, not all cage-free operations are particularly fantastic either. I don't know tons about eggs past such generalities, would be interested in seeing someone with more information.

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    • #3
      Caged birds feed completely on a processed grain-based feed mix. While these birds are made to digest grain and seed, they are also meant to feed on insects and grasses. The omega and nutrient content of the eggs produced varies immensely.
      Also, for some reason there are more allergens in the whites of conventional eggs that aren't as prevalent in cage-free eggs.
      My husband is mildly allergic to eggs- gets an itchy, swollen throat and diarrhea with conventional eggs. He barely has a reaction (if any) to most cage-free eggs.
      You don't have to be sick to get better.
      Female, 31 years old, 5'8"
      Primal start: 1/2/2012
      My Primal Journal
      Living, loving and learning.

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      • #4
        The basic idea is that when a chicken lives like it supposed to (runs around in open spaces and isn't crammed into a little house on top of 100 other chickens) and eats what it's supposed to (an omnivorous diet consisting of bugs, worms, grass and a *little* alfalfa/grain) that the product they produce (eggs) is of higher quality. Less toxins, more quality fats (such as O3) and all in all an egg that's healthier for us to consume.

        Besides, they just taste better!
        Re-focusing on the Primal Lifestyle in 2012!

        Starting: 221.0lb, 29.5% BF (1/9/2012)
        Latest: 208.9, 26.1% BF (3/19/2012)

        http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread35679.html

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        • #5
          unfortunately, the label "cage free," when it comes to eggs, means almost nothing. yup, nothing. Egg Purchasing Guide | Mark's Daily Apple

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          • #6
            Originally posted by jakey View Post
            unfortunately, the label "cage free," when it comes to eggs, means almost nothing. yup, nothing. Egg Purchasing Guide | Mark's Daily Apple
            Wow I didn't know that. I I guess I'm alright just buying the 60 egg bulk pack from costco? Or even though it probably doesn't mean anything would I still be better off buying cage free to be safe?

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            • #7
              my take is that we do the best we can. organic at least ensures better quality, non-GMO feed. omega3 eggs will have better nutrition, chickens still probably led shitty lives. farmer's market eggs are your best bet, and i buy those weekly. if i'm buying in the market i do shoot for the brown organic eggs, if nothing else, or the omega3 eggs. cage free sometimes too, with the hope that one of those chickens made it outside for like a day...

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              • #8
                Originally posted by jakey View Post
                my take is that we do the best we can. organic at least ensures better quality, non-GMO feed. omega3 eggs will have better nutrition, chickens still probably led shitty lives. farmer's market eggs are your best bet, and i buy those weekly. if i'm buying in the market i do shoot for the brown organic eggs, if nothing else, or the omega3 eggs. cage free sometimes too, with the hope that one of those chickens made it outside for like a day...
                Yeah seems like a good plan. If I can't afford or don't have access to the brown organic ones is it detrimental to eat the regular ones, or is it mostly discouraged because of the bad lives that the chickens live?

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                • #9
                  What do you mean by 'brown' organic eggs? The colour of the egg happens due to the colouring of the chook

                  I get some of mine via the back yard but unfortunately, I'm not allowed to keep as many chooks as I need to (cos I live in town). The yolks are beautiful orange and the flavour is superb. My chooks are very spoilt and get lots of treats and you can tell by the flavour. I do, at times, have to buy other people's eggs (or get them from our school as we have chooks there too) and they obviously don't get the treats mine do, cos the flavour is lacking.

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                  • #10
                    IMHO, there is no excuse for buying eggs from caged hens. The food and drugs they are given are crap, and their wretched lives are even crappier.

                    Get the best quality eggs you can afford and CHECK their source, because you can't rely on the various weaselly definitions that the industry uses (and inadequate regulation lets them get away with). Find out if the birds are actually allowed out to pasture, to eat bugs and move freely and engage in their instinctive behaviours. Support those farmers who are trying to do the right thing, so there will eventually be more of them and fewer of the nasty factory farms with mutilated and miserable birds.

                    And yes, the colour of the shell has nothing to do with the egg's nutritional value; it simply varies according to the breed/colour of the hen.
                    I have the simplest tastes. I am always satisfied with the best.

                    Oscar Wilde

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Bron View Post
                      What do you mean by 'brown' organic eggs?
                      i mean the ones that are brown colored! they please me more than the ones that are white. i try not to let real logic interfere.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Bron View Post
                        What do you mean by 'brown' organic eggs? The colour of the egg happens due to the colouring of the chook

                        I get some of mine via the back yard but unfortunately, I'm not allowed to keep as many chooks as I need to (cos I live in town). The yolks are beautiful orange and the flavour is superb. My chooks are very spoilt and get lots of treats and you can tell by the flavour. I do, at times, have to buy other people's eggs (or get them from our school as we have chooks there too) and they obviously don't get the treats mine do, cos the flavour is lacking.
                        +2 I get blue (aqua), brown, white, greenish-blue eggs from a local farmer. The color of shell depends on the type of chicken. Just cause they're brown don't mean they're good. When you crack 'em open they should be like Bron describes "beautiful orange". If the yolk is a pale yellow and tiny as hell you got junk eggs...
                        Self-realization. I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

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                        • #13
                          Interesting info here. This is one of the reasons I'm about to embark or raising my own chickens - for the farm fresh eggs. I can control what they eat and their living conditions, making for healthier eggs. And yes, the color of the egg shell depends on the breed, nothing else.

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                          • #15
                            I think there is a huge amount of confusion between "cage-free" and "pastured." Cage-free means the chickens have *access* to a small door that leads outside of their huge coop. They very rarely use this access. It's true they are not confined to small cages, but for all intents and purposes, they are confined to the coop building, in overcrowded numbers.

                            Commercially, pastured chickens actually live outside in smaller flocks confined in portable "yards" and spend their days eating grasses and bugs. At night, they enter small portable coops parked within the yard. The yards and coops are moved to fresh pasture every few days

                            Chickens are not vegetarians. Chickens that have been fed a strictly vegetarian diet have been abused, IMO. They will never produce the highest quality eggs because they have not been allowed to be chickens. Additionally, many of these vegetarian chicken diets rely heavily on soy.

                            Organic is better than chemicalized. Pastured is better than cage-free. Chickens raised on organic pastures will give the best eggs.

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