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  • #31
    1



    Tomatoes have some potential implication in developing/exacerbating Multiple Sclerosis. Loren Cordain mentions elimination of grains and tomatoes needs to be looked at further in this regard. Tomatoes may fit a Primal diet, but likely NOT a Paleo nutritional approach (as well as peppers, potatoes, etc mentioned above)

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    • #32
      1

      [quote]

      Life without New Mexico style green chile wouldn&#39;t be worth living.</blockquote>


      I think I need the recipe...


      I&#39;m just not *there*--in a place where I&#39;m wanting or ready to cut those nightshades out. Maybe in the future... I&#39;m definitely interested in reading more on the tomato/nightshade/multiple sclerosis connection though.

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      • #33
        1



        FairyRae, are you at all familiar with GC?


        Recipes are on the intertubes and are variations on a narrow theme.


        The biggest problem outside of NM, CO, and occasionally TX, is getting the roasted chiles. I brought a few gallons with me from CO to FL when I moved. Last week I roasted some pasillos and jalapenos on the grill to good results. Not the same, but close enough.

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        • #34
          1



          GC? (All this makes me think of is Good Calories Bad Calories...)


          I can certainly look up a recipe.

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          • #35
            1



            Green Chile. I was being lazy and now I pay for it!


            Some roasted chiles w/o skin or seeds, sautee&#39;d onion, garlic, chicken broth. That&#39;s the basics. Add pork to make GC stew, tomatoes if you wish, a bit of corn masa to thicken.


            This is one eating event that I will eat corn; it&#39;s just part of it. I used cut up pieces of flour tortillas to thicken and I made corn chips with the tortilla pieces fried in lard. So at least it was a tiny bit paleo!

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            • #36
              1



              Nightshades cause join pain (and potentially arthritis).


              I had bad knees for most of my life that are now fantastic. I can tell if I get exposed to nightshades because I can feel it in my knees again. My wife had the same thing in her hips.


              Nightshades aren&#39;t worth the side effects for us. We prefer to have better mobility.

              The "Seven Deadly Sins"

              Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . . Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
              Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
              Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

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              • #37
                1



                I was looking on WH foods and it said that sweet potatoes have less glycoalkaloids than regular white potatoes, does this mean that they are more okay to eat? or should they really be avoided? i just love them a lot! thanks for everyones help

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                • #38
                  1



                  Mmmm--sound yummy! (I cannot do corn, but have utilized arrowroot starch or coconut flour to thicken things w/ good results.) Thanks for clarifying OTB!


                  Hannah, have you seen this: http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=175097
                  [quote]

                  In the present collaborative study carried out in Korea, we showed that glycoalkaloids isolated from five commercial potato varieties widely consumed in Korea and Japan also inhibit the growth of human cervical, liver, lymphoma, and stomach cancer cells and that mixtures of two glycoalkaloids can act synergistically in destroying the cells. This information can guide the development and use of health-promoting potatoes containing optimum combination of the two major glycoalkaloids a-chaconine and a-solanine.</blockquote>


                  Not sure it has any validity (there can be so much bias in studies) but thought it was relevant!

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                  • #39
                    1



                    Tubers are a staple of nearly every hunter/gatherer population studied so I don&#39;t know why they wouldn&#39;t be considered &#39;primal&#39;.


                    I eat them (in moderation because I feel much better low-carb) because I need to gain weight, not lose it. And they don&#39;t give me the digestive issues grains and legumes do.

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                    • #40
                      1



                      This thread talks a lot about sweet potatoes, potatoes and other wild tubers, but what about roots like carrots or beets?


                      Would they be considered primal? If you had to choose between berries or root vegies, witch one would be the best choice.


                      I want to stay out of ketosis right now because my kidneys are sore and I want to make it easy on them since I&#39;m scared they could get worse. I need to rely on a safe source of carb and I know large quantities of green leaky vegies or cruciferous vegies could be a problem. What&#39;s left seem to be roots, fruits and winter squash. Are all of these possibly primal?

                      Get great paleo diet lifestyle tricks, recipes and cooking tips. My contribution to the paleo movement.

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                      • #41
                        1



                        italians eat tons of tomatoes and don&#39;t have a high incidence of joint pain. so it may be one of those many things where individual mileage varies.


                        tubers and roots are pretty paleo, or at least it is not certain to argue they are purely neolithic.

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                        • #42
                          1



                          Just wanted to share a link to a post by Tarlach from the caveman forums.


                          http://cavemanforum.com/index.php?topic=976.msg7067#msg7067


                          There are multiple links that are worth following and reading in this post that are related to eating nightshades (tomatoes, potatoes [white--not sweet], bell peppers, eggplant, etc.) and general health.


                          After doing all this reading, I&#39;m now really thinking about trying to drop nightshades from my diet for a bit, b/c I do have some minor joint pains that I think get better when I am getting enough bone broth in, but I&#39;m wondering if they are linked to my nightshade consumption. (I also have a history of arthritis in my family--my grandmother and father both had/have it, so if some people are more prone to it then others, I&#39;d think I&#39;d be one...) From what I&#39;ve read, it only takes a few weeks of eliminating them to see if they cause problems for you.


                          I also find it interesting that white potatoes (which are in the nightshade family) are NOT in the same &#39;food family&#39; as arrowroot (a tuber often considered paleo) or sweet potatoes (morning glory family). (For more on food families, check out: http://www.calgaryallergy.ca/Article...by_Food_Family )


                          And, just fyi:
                          [quote]

                          Nightshade: Brinjal, Cayenne, Capsicum, Eggplant, Ground Cherry, Banana Pepper, Bell Pepper, Chili Pepper, Green Pepper, Red Pepper, Sweet Pepper, Paprika, Pimento, Potato, Tabasco, Thorn Apple, Tobacco, Tomato.</blockquote>


                          @ sebzzz--Sorry I&#39;ve got no info on the carrots/beets--I personally think they are paleo/acceptable. I do think starchy veggies are an ok addition to a paleo diet, from what I&#39;ve read. That&#39;s just my opinion though!

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                          • #43
                            1



                            Carrots and beets are pretty sugary. Use with care!

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                            • #44
                              1



                              I&#39;m following a merge of the Primal Diet and Alton Brown&#39;s "Plan of Four Lists" from one of his shows (S13 E13) along with a couple of other rules that are consistent with the PD.


                              - He recommends eating sweet potatoes at least three times a week

                              - He recommends eating carrots daily...


                              Given the starchiness of sweet potatoes, I think limiting your consumption to no more than 3 x a week and adhere to your carb guidelines for weight loss/weight maintenance is a good choice...

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                              • #45
                                1



                                Don&#39;t understand the purists. We evolved in Africa but virtually none of the domesticated plants and animals available as modern food are African in origin. And obviously all domesticated species are significantly different than their wild base - they have been selectively bred to be bigger, softer, sweeter, and fattier. Mmm.


                                How is eating a domestic cow any more &#39;paleo&#39; technically than eating a yam?

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