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Is Dairy Paleo? Great Article on the herder-gather era

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  • Is Dairy Paleo? Great Article on the herder-gather era

    Is dairy paleo? (part 2) Revising history with new perspectives on flocks of goats, femur bones and feckless nutritionism | drcate.com

    Hmmm seems like experimenting with an increase in whole raw dairy may be in order.... The only dairy I currently consume is about 5 ounces of raw milk cheddar cheese a week.
    Primal since March 2011

    Female/29 years old/5' 1"/130ish lbs

  • #2
    Darn interesting article! Question is - have we been milking animals long enough!
    Started 9/15/11 at 323 pounds
    2/16/13 at 241 pounds
    Goal is 223 pounds or less

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    • #3
      Interesting, thank you! Sadly irrelevant to me "in real life", as even raw milk disagrees with me *sad sigh*

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Go Tribe View Post
        Darn interesting article! Question is - have we been milking animals long enough!
        According to the article, since it literally caused a change in our bone structure at the same time we started herding, I would say most likely yes.
        Primal since March 2011

        Female/29 years old/5' 1"/130ish lbs

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        • #5
          They found a grave in hte middle of a town in Belgium that was dated back 35000 years. (not a typo)
          When the grave was excavated they found that is was an unusually large dog burried with flowers and gifts in hte center of that town. This meant that people domesticated animals (even if just a wolf) way before we thought they would.

          Also, the first mutation of human bones are also dated about 35000 years back. People started to be born with excess bone formations like extra 2 ribs (men and women) and 1 extra vertabrae (at tailbone). Since organs weren't preserved they also figure that most of those carry a 3rd kidney.
          All those human mutations are of a rare blood type A-, B- and AB-. The extra kidney seems to have grown to process the extra protein (milk) and the bones formed due to abundant bio-available minerals.
          The rare blood types are also concentrated in areas where herder-gatherers would've most likely evolved.

          Not sure if it's just coincidence, but sure is interesting.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by activia View Post
            Hmmm seems like experimenting with an increase in whole raw dairy may be in order.... The only dairy I currently consume is about 5 ounces of raw milk cheddar cheese a week.
            Hmm I did forget about all that pasture raised butter that I eat as well... I'm starting to think giving raw milk to children is a good idea tho. Worth the trouble that is... lucky we can still buy it in MA unfortunately it entails going to a local dairy farm.
            Primal since March 2011

            Female/29 years old/5' 1"/130ish lbs

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            • #7
              Anecdote only, but I really do well with full fat, mostly raw dairy (or cultured). Never had a problem with dairy, even before when I used to have conventional dairy products. Not sure of my blood type, but perhaps its one that's adapted to milk. Once I upped my dairy, even before going primal(ish), a lot of health issues disappeared. I came to primal/paleo from Weston A. Price, and they do advocate milk and milk products - Rami Nagel's work on healing dental decay, which does have a large dairy component, comes to mind.

              I think for some, dairy (raw or cultured) is great - others, not so much.

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              • #8
                Great article, thanks for posting.

                I'm one of the lucky one's in that dairy doesn't bother me a bit. Which works well for me because I subscribe to the dietary rule that everything tastes better with cheese

                OTOH, I'm so bad with gluten that stuff I used to love isn't even tempting anymore - it's just not worth it...

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by lexie View Post
                  Anecdote only, but I really do well with full fat, mostly raw dairy (or cultured). Never had a problem with dairy, even before when I used to have conventional dairy products. Not sure of my blood type, but perhaps its one that's adapted to milk. Once I upped my dairy, even before going primal(ish), a lot of health issues disappeared. I came to primal/paleo from Weston A. Price, and they do advocate milk and milk products - Rami Nagel's work on healing dental decay, which does have a large dairy component, comes to mind.

                  I think for some, dairy (raw or cultured) is great - others, not so much.
                  Exactly this. We go through a lot of raw dairy (milk, cream, cultured butter, sour cream) each week and neither my husband nor I have had any issues.

                  And it makes my teeth pearly - I definitely notice a difference in how my teeth feel if I skip the dairy for a few days, which I think is largely attributable the the Vitamin K2 it provides.
                  Primal cookery, forgotten skills, natural birth
                  www.forgottendomesticarts.com

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                  • #10
                    Thanks for posting the article - very interesting. I'm pescatarian and eat a lot of goat's cheese and butter, and quite a bit of sheep's cheese. I seem to be intolerant to cow's dairy (I developed eczema briefly as a baby when I was introduced to cow's milk - the eczema did not reappear until my mid twenties).

                    It seems there is a huge genetic element to toleration to dairy, both the casein and lactose, perhaps more genetic variation than almost any other food. That makes a lot of sense in the context of this article.

                    Also, it seems very logical to me that there was a strong evolutionary pressure how ever many tens of thousands of years ago to adapt to eating dairy from other animals. Dairy is hardly an alien food to mammals.

                    My genes are apparently mostly celtic with some Scandinavian thrown in ... no brown eyes in my family and mostly blue on my Mum's side and green on my Dad's (that's where my Irish surname comes from - but I am only 1/8 Irish), and all fair haired as kids. I remember reading a thread here that discussed the traditional celtic diet which was oats, vegetables, fish, dairy, alcohol. I don't eat oats now but of all the grains I've eaten (apart from white rice) I believe that's given me the least problems.
                    F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by paleo-bunny View Post
                      I remember reading a thread here that discussed the traditional celtic diet which was oats, vegetables, fish, dairy, alcohol.
                      I have a lot of Irish, English, Scottish in my family tree and can handle dairy with ease. Hell, I drink milk to calm my stomach. I also figure the dairy gene follows the whiskey gene. I have no problem with that either. (Depends on who you ask.)

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                      • #12
                        Hmmm whiskey is a bit grainy so I rarely drink it any more.

                        Perhaps I should experiment with reintroducing it as I used to love the stuff, especially a single malt as a treat.
                        F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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                        • #13
                          I'm the same -- a smidge of lactose intolerance. but at christmas time (which is to say, JUNE here), I indulge in some local, raw, fancy-pants cheese.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by zoebird View Post
                            I'm the same -- a smidge of lactose intolerance. but at christmas time (which is to say, JUNE here), I indulge in some local, raw, fancy-pants cheese.
                            Tough to find cheese, around here - where it only says raw cheese, on the in the ingredients list.
                            If you have a problem with what you read: 1. Get a dictionary 2. Don't read it 3. Grow up 4. After 3, go back to 1/ or 2. -- Dennis Blue. | "I don't care about your opinion, only your analysis"- Professor Calabrese. | "Life is more important than _______" - Drew | I eat animals that eat vegetables -- Matt Millen, former NFL Linebacker. | "This country is built on sugar & shit that comes in a box marinated in gluten - abc123

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by aidennsoah
                              Good and excellent article! Very interesting and this article really got me thinking that she made some radical but believable leap of faith in her thinking which makes everyone to support and inspire.I really like raw milk which is very healthy. This article shows a strong evidence that bone length is greater in african tribes who consume dairy than who do not. Yes, milk makes bones to grow and it makes us taller. So, milk is not neolithic after all.
                              Even if milk were neolithic, the fact that the majority of Europeans evolved in such a short space of time to thrive on it indicates that at some point diary consumption confered a strong survival advantage.

                              Evolution, or genetic change, usually occurs in acute spikes in response to acute changes in environment. The school textbook view of evolution as a slow and steady process is incorrect. It just appears that way from the occasional snapshots that fossil records provide of 100s of millions of years of evolution. Sometimes a species' environment is so constant it undergoes no significant genetic changes for 10s of millions of years.

                              Currently there's a massive selection pressure for those genes that confer toleration of grains, PUFA, and inflammation, and produce weaker specific immune responses.
                              Last edited by paleo-bunny; 04-03-2012, 02:28 AM. Reason: grammar
                              F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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