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Anyone doing a leptin diet that is NOT Jack Kruse style?

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  • Anyone doing a leptin diet that is NOT Jack Kruse style?

    As the title says...is anyone doing a leptin diet that is NOT Jack Kruse style? But follows the 5 leptin rules as set out by most leptin experts. No snacking, high protein breakfast, 12hrs from dinner to breakfast etc?.

  • #2
    Do you mean the 5 rules by Byron Richards? I saw his site and his leptin reset seems much easier. I am interested to know if it is as effective as Jack Kruse's method.

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    • #3
      Yes that's the one I mean. I have read many good reviews of it on different websites, many people having good results. I don't see why it wouldn't work to be honest.

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      • #4
        I'm curious... what are the 5 rules?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by SusanMcL View Post
          I'm curious... what are the 5 rules?
          The Five Rules of The Leptin Diet | Weight Loss News

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          • #6
            Farfalla - Thank you !!!

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            • #7
              Hmm.... fiber? Fruit? That wouldn't work for me.

              Comment


              • #8
                Somewhere along the lines i must have reset my leptin somehow (I think) because I don't have hunger/craving/satiation issues anymore, and i used to be a compulsive overeater with a minor in binge-eating. When I first went gluten/dairy free, I was still eating a ton of non-gluten grains and legumey stuff (like hummus, etc). My whole life I've been obsessed with food, with thinking about food, with planning ways to sneak-eat lots of candy or a whole bag of cookies/potato chips without anyone knowing...I'd make a huge dinner, then be starving 20 minutes later. I thought about food constantly, and if I was hungry, I couldn't think about anything else, I'd feel like the world was ending. This sounds like a leptin problem (in addition to other stuff), no?

                When i first went Paleo, and cut out the legumes and stopped eating any grains/starches (I'd have something with white rice maybe once a month), it was really hard. I was craving carbs all the time. I didn't know anyting about leptin, or even that there was such a thing as the paleo/primal diet (I fell into paleo as a result of trying to create a healthy diet for myself and realized later it already existed!) Everytime I got a sugar craving, I told myself I could eat as much fruit as I wanted, which I did. Every time I was hungry 10 minutes afer dinner, I told myself I could eat as much as I wanted, as long as it was veggies or lean meat/fish, which I did. Some nights l had 3 dinners (homemade chicken veggie soup). Eventually, over months, my hunger cooled down, my cravings diminished, and now I usually eat 2 meals a day (I do 8/16 intermittent fasts, with some 24hour ones), and either don't feel hungry, or if I do I can acknowledge that I'm hungry and wait till later - my hunger doesn't drive me anymore, it's something in the background that I decide to listen to or not.

                In retrospect, the things that were the most important for me were:

                *Not ever telling myself that I could never eat things again. Instead, I focused only on the present day. Instead of saying 'I can't eat potato chips', I'd tell myself, 'those chips look good, but not today, maybe tomorrow.'

                *Having the green light to eat as much of something healthy (like fruit and veggies) as I needed to be full

                *Increasing my protein. A lot. I had been averaging something like 25 grams a day, I now average 75-125 grams per day.

                *Making sure I always had healthy food (like veggie soup) in the fridge, so I wouldn't let poor judgement during a hunger attack make me eat junk.

                *Not keeping ANY junk in the house. At all. Not even dried fruit, which for me was a binge trigger.

                I think it takes time, months and months, to retrain our brains to work properly after a lifetime of being abused. I don't think there's any magic method, and while I think Jack Kruse is awesome, I don't think his method is magic, it's really just about eating a lot of protein to reduce faulty hunger signals.
                Whether you follow his step-by-steps or do a variation, it still takes time, dedication, hard work.

                Sometimes I think that people who are feeling powerless need to have something to blame (It's LEPTIN! LEPTIN made me eat that bucket of chicken!) and have a catchy name like 'leptin reset'- to avoid taking responsibility for falling off the wagon or having an unhealthy relationship with food. What I did probably accomplished the same thing as a leptin reset, I just didn't have a cool name to call it.

                I hope I've not offended anyone, or implied that hormonal issues aren't real, but sometimes it seems like people are looing for an easy way to fix complicated problems. Fixing our relationship with food isn't easy, there's no magic to it. You just have to grit your teeth and not give up, and it will eventually get better.

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                • #9
                  "Resetting your leptin" is based on pseudo science (or really no science at all) and it is just a way to restrict your calories and lose weight. When you follow the rules of resetting your leptin you eat more protein which blunts hunger and you don't snack which cuts down your calories, thus you lose weight.

                  Nothing magic about it. I challenge anyone that says otherwise to post one study showing that any of that stuff does ANYTHING to leptin. Spoiler alert, there are none, because its bullshit.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    LOL @ these 5 rules:

                    The Five Rules of the The Leptin Diet are:
                    Rule 1: Never eat after dinner.
                    Rule 2: Eat three meals a day.
                    Rule 3: Do not eat large meals.
                    Rule 4: Eat a breakfast containing protein.
                    Rule 5: Reduce the amount of carbohydrates eaten.

                    Each one of those rules, if followed, reduces the amount of calories you eat. That is why it works. Because you aren't eating as many calories. My favorite is that you are limited to 3 meals a day, but they can't be big, LOL! "I'm losing weight because I am resetting my leptin"...ughhh, no, sorry, you are losing weight by eating less calories.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      That looks suspiciously like any generic sorta low carb diet. And it offers no reasons why.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Snauzoo View Post
                        That looks suspiciously like any generic sorta low carb diet. And it offers no reasons why.
                        Dr Kruse doesn't offer any reasons why either...at least ones that are based on science and not big words that have absolutely nothing to do with what he is talking about.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          JimHensen - Didja ever think that maybe eating the normal SAD all day is what gets your leptin out of whack?
                          Last edited by otzi; 01-11-2012, 03:53 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by otzi View Post
                            Didja ever think that maybe eating like a pig all day is what gets your leptin out of whack?

                            I am not sure who your comment was directed toward, so I am not going to take it personally. I have never been morbidly obese. But I did suffer from a rather large weight gain as a result of some prescription drugs at a point when my lifestyle changed dramatically and I entered menopause. My brother, my husband, and my father all were diagnosed with cancer. (testicular, non Hodgkins lymphoma and multiple myeloma respectively). The first two are in remission. My dad died, leaving a blind widow and I was also the primary caregiver for a new born unplanned baby girl. If you cannot relate to the stress that this entails, I cannot help you.

                            My life became a series of chemo therapy appts, cross country travels to med centers, being up all night with a baby, and the mundane ordinary stresses of how to pay bills and put dinner on the table the few nights I was actually home to do so.

                            I was put on Prozac like many peri menopausal women and that was the straw that broke the camels back. It was an instant fat pill. So when things got back to normal, I lost the weight. The south beach diet caught my attention at a cardiovascular nursing conference and our department considered using the concepts with some of our low fat, high carb diet failures. I was the guinea pig LOL. I lost a total of 55 lbs, back to my high school track and swim team weight, losing all the tiny incremental baby fat lbs from three pregnancies. I was back to teaching and running my department. It was not until I hit my mid 60s that I started having sleeping problems, digestive problems, etc that prompted me to clean up my diet. And I wanted to deal with a nagging 15 lb weight gain. So I ended up here because I saw a lot of women working through very similar issues. Some fat, some not so fat, some skinny fat and some recovering from anorexia.

                            I guess I took a lot more time in crafting my reply than you remark really deserved, but I really think what you said was at best hastily written and probably not well considered. As Dr. Lustig so ably put it, obesity is not a disease of gluttony and sloth.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by BestBetter View Post
                              Somewhere along the lines i must have reset my leptin somehow (I think) because I don't have hunger/craving/satiation issues anymore, and i used to be a compulsive overeater with a minor in binge-eating. When I first went gluten/dairy free, I was still eating a ton of non-gluten grains and legumey stuff (like hummus, etc). My whole life I've been obsessed with food, with thinking about food, with planning ways to sneak-eat lots of candy or a whole bag of cookies/potato chips without anyone knowing...I'd make a huge dinner, then be starving 20 minutes later. I thought about food constantly, and if I was hungry, I couldn't think about anything else, I'd feel like the world was ending. This sounds like a leptin problem (in addition to other stuff), no?

                              When i first went Paleo, and cut out the legumes and stopped eating any grains/starches (I'd have something with white rice maybe once a month), it was really hard. I was craving carbs all the time. I didn't know anyting about leptin, or even that there was such a thing as the paleo/primal diet (I fell into paleo as a result of trying to create a healthy diet for myself and realized later it already existed!) Everytime I got a sugar craving, I told myself I could eat as much fruit as I wanted, which I did. Every time I was hungry 10 minutes afer dinner, I told myself I could eat as much as I wanted, as long as it was veggies or lean meat/fish, which I did. Some nights l had 3 dinners (homemade chicken veggie soup). Eventually, over months, my hunger cooled down, my cravings diminished, and now I usually eat 2 meals a day (I do 8/16 intermittent fasts, with some 24hour ones), and either don't feel hungry, or if I do I can acknowledge that I'm hungry and wait till later - my hunger doesn't drive me anymore, it's something in the background that I decide to listen to or not.

                              In retrospect, the things that were the most important for me were:

                              *Not ever telling myself that I could never eat things again. Instead, I focused only on the present day. Instead of saying 'I can't eat potato chips', I'd tell myself, 'those chips look good, but not today, maybe tomorrow.'

                              *Having the green light to eat as much of something healthy (like fruit and veggies) as I needed to be full

                              *Increasing my protein. A lot. I had been averaging something like 25 grams a day, I now average 75-125 grams per day.

                              *Making sure I always had healthy food (like veggie soup) in the fridge, so I wouldn't let poor judgement during a hunger attack make me eat junk.

                              *Not keeping ANY junk in the house. At all. Not even dried fruit, which for me was a binge trigger.

                              I think it takes time, months and months, to retrain our brains to work properly after a lifetime of being abused. I don't think there's any magic method, and while I think Jack Kruse is awesome, I don't think his method is magic, it's really just about eating a lot of protein to reduce faulty hunger signals.
                              Whether you follow his step-by-steps or do a variation, it still takes time, dedication, hard work.

                              Sometimes I think that people who are feeling powerless need to have something to blame (It's LEPTIN! LEPTIN made me eat that bucket of chicken!) and have a catchy name like 'leptin reset'- to avoid taking responsibility for falling off the wagon or having an unhealthy relationship with food. What I did probably accomplished the same thing as a leptin reset, I just didn't have a cool name to call it.

                              I hope I've not offended anyone, or implied that hormonal issues aren't real, but sometimes it seems like people are looing for an easy way to fix complicated problems. Fixing our relationship with food isn't easy, there's no magic to it. You just have to grit your teeth and not give up, and it will eventually get better.
                              THANK YOU for this breath of fresh air. What a well worded, spot-on assessment- and very inspiring, too. I am struggling to overcome disordered eating and very real preoccupation with food and weight and it is so good to read this. You give me hope that I am slowly inching my way there. It is hard to see progress when you are so aware of the roadblocks and stumbles, but reading this helps me to remember that I AM doing good things, even if I'm not where I want to be yet.

                              Thank you.

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