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Support your local farmer...CSA's

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  • Support your local farmer...CSA's

    Hello all! I am an organic farmer from Montana. I am new to the primal diet (3 months in). It seems as though everyone here eats copious (in a good way) amounts of veggies, eggs and meats. I want to mention some local food options for folks on this forum who may not know about organic farms, CSA's and meat co-ops. I think is is very primal to buy local and eat seasonally .
    #1. Our farm is a CSA farm. CSA stand for community Supported Agriculture. It is basically a pay in advance vegetable subscription that starts in May-ish and runs through October -ish. It is a great deal, super fresh food once a week, you support local ag, and it is a taste of eating seasonal! You can find your CSA farm online on a website called Local harvest. There are sometimes options for eggs and meat included. *Often you can also buy root crops & winter greens in the winter from local farms as well. Contact them!
    #2. Buy a cow! You can actually by a whole or half cow, pig, lamb...ect from a local farmer. yes, they will butcher it for you (unless of course you feel the need to do it yourself! )
    #3. Local Eggs- All eggs are not equal..buy local! They are super fresh..especially when eating raw it is really important! Try to buy eggs that are not fed GMO corn, are free range..pastured poultry is best!
    #4. Chicken CSA- There are many chicken CSA's popping up. The same for veggies but with fresh chicken. Same for eggs..choose pastured poultry.
    #5. Farmer's markets ! Make sure what you buy is free from pesticides, herbicides and non-organic petroleum free fertilizers. Ask questions! Some say pesticide free but use dangerous fertilizers!
    That is all I can think of! Okay, I will step of my soapbox!

  • #2
    I've been trying to buy locally more often, but I didn't know about CSA's. Thanks for the information!
    this great blue world of ours seems a house of leaves, moments before the wind

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    • #3
      I've always wanted to try a CSA but can't commit to the quantity. I hope that purchasing local from the co-op and farmers market is supportive enough.
      Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
        I've always wanted to try a CSA but can't commit to the quantity. I hope that purchasing local from the co-op and farmers market is supportive enough.
        I think buying locally from co-op or markets is supportive enough, fantastic! If you are interested in CSA, I know that some farms (we do!) offer half shares!

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        • #5
          I get beef/poultry from a local farm around here Welcome to John Crow Farm I love their program because they have pickup locations once a month so you dont have to store an entire cow. You can fit it in your regular freezer. They also provide eggs.
          Primal since March 2011

          Female/29 years old/5' 1"/130ish lbs

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          • #6
            Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
            I've always wanted to try a CSA but can't commit to the quantity. I hope that purchasing local from the co-op and farmers market is supportive enough.
            Some farms have different sized boxes available. I've avoided doing a CSA, but found out (a little too late) that a farm that's down the street from me has half boxes available which is more manageable than what the other farms offer. From talking to some of the farms, the larger the farm, the less likely they'll do this as it becomes a hassle with all the orders they have. So, in short, look for a small farm, they might be able to suit your needs.

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            • #7
              I'm joining a CSA for the first time this year, can't wait to get started in the spring! I wish I could find one that has grass-fed beef, and pastured chickens and eggs too.

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              • #8
                I've been on a csa for three years now and have been very pleased. will do it as long as I live, and will add eggs this year.
                Liberalism: ideas so good they have to be mandatory.

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                • #9
                  We buy completely local and seasonal. In the winter our meat/fat consumption goes up because there is no plant matter available locally during that season...so we all lose some weight over the cold winter months

                  We even get our water locally, it's from a geothermal underground water well, with high mineral content. The only thing we buy out of state is fish and the occassional lettuce from the store during winter.
                  I LOVE the farmer's markets and co-ops around here.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by spincycle View Post
                    I'm joining a CSA for the first time this year, can't wait to get started in the spring! I wish I could find one that has grass-fed beef, and pastured chickens and eggs too.
                    I bet there is someone who supplies grass fed beef in your area..ask around! Nothing feels better than having a cow in your freezer

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                    • #11
                      My brother's neighbor had some angus cows she raised and butchered. I got a few servings of it and remember as being quite tasty. I have a friend who raises free range chickens. He sells the eggs from a small shed, those are also quite tasty. It took me several weeks, a few dozen to get accustomed to the taste over store bought. His chickens also taste better. A cleaner fresher chicken flavor. My mother says they taste like the chickens they raised in the 30's. I just found a local farm that raises grass fed beef, pastured chickens and pigs. They are sold out for the season, but I am on the mailing list for spring ordering. At 40+ miles, they are not quite local enough for me. Still searching for a closer farm.
                      Learning the intricacies of healthy eating and nourishing my body the right way.
                      I am not bald, that is a Vitamin D collector. Time to Grok and Roll!
                      Eased into a primal diet starting at Christmas 2011. Goal weight - 205 started: 240 pounds waist 40, now 227 pounds and waist 38 Summer 2012 - weight =215 and waist is actually still 39"
                      ljbprrfmof = LJ = Little John = John

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                      • #12
                        Are CSA's financially better for the farmer than just buying the stuff at the market? I don't think I can handle even a half share by myself. And to be honest, I like having several vendors to choose from. (for example, I don't want to stuck with a boxfull of kohlrabi.)
                        5'0" female, 45 years old. Started Primal October 31, 2011, at a skinny fat 111.5 lbs. Low weight: 99.5 lb on a fast. Gained back to 115(!) on SAD chocolate, potato chips, and stress. Currently 111.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by activia View Post
                          I get beef/poultry from a local farm around here Welcome to John Crow Farm I love their program because they have pickup locations once a month so you dont have to store an entire cow. You can fit it in your regular freezer. They also provide eggs.
                          I'm glad I live so close to them...in addition to my meat and poultry csa's I go there every weekend and get 2 - 3 dozen eggs. Most of the time I'm picking them up off the ground or other random places...it's like an Easter egg hunt but the eggs are much healthier.

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                          • #14
                            [B"]Are CSA's financially better for the farmer than just buying the stuff at the market? I don't think I can handle even a half share by myself. And to be honest, I like having several vendors to choose from. (for example, I don't want to stuck with a boxfull of kohlrabi.) "

                            [/B]

                            Yes, CSA's are better for the farmer because of the direct marketing. When we sell to a super market we often do not get much money for our product..making it hard to survive as a small farmer. I cannot understand not getting through a CSA share myself because I eat a lot of vegetables. My husband and I typically can go through 1.5-2 shares a week! A good CSA farm will always give you a diversity of vegetables not just a bunch of one item! Our typical drop in July would include 1lb salad mix, spring onions, bunch carrots, 2 zuchini/summer squash, cucumber, 1 head broccoli, and maybe a 1-2lb sugar snap peas. I do understand wanting to have choices..farmers market would be a good option! Also, you are not alone in being overwhelmed by the veggies..many are but then again they are also eating lots of grain.
                            Last edited by nettle1976; 01-08-2012, 08:18 PM.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by raftguide3r View Post
                              I'm glad I live so close to them...in addition to my meat and poultry csa's I go there every weekend and get 2 - 3 dozen eggs. Most of the time I'm picking them up off the ground or other random places...it's like an Easter egg hunt but the eggs are much healthier.
                              That is awesome!!!

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