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The Miracle of Vitamin D: Sound Science, or Hype?

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  • The Miracle of Vitamin D: Sound Science, or Hype?



    New York Time's take on Vit D: http://2.ly/jq4

    “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
    "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
    "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

  • #2
    1



    Nice article.


    I also like this post:

    http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.com/2009/12/vitamin-d-and-uv-fluctuations-2.html
    [quote]

    Dr Vieth has a model of tissue 1,25(OH)2D synthesis and degradation in which the level of active substance is pretty well independent of blood vitamin D level, provided the level is either rising or stable.
    </blockquote>


    Basically, testing your blood for vitamin D is a complete waste of effort as it gives no indication of how much available vitamin D is in your tissue.


    ..and there&#39;s more to it than sun exposure.
    [quote]

    From all of this I would deduce that, under marginal levels of UVB in Glasgow, the primary determinant of gross clinical expression of deficiency of vitamin D is vegetarianism. There is a protective effect of meat consumption.</blockquote>
    [quote]

    It seems like humans can get away with vegetarianism in the tropics. Move north and you need to eat meat.
    </blockquote>
    The "Seven Deadly Sins"

    • Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . • Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . .• Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
    • Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . • Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . • Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
    • Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

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    • #3
      1



      "protective effect of meat"


      Is that simply that meat has contains fat-soluble vit D, the kind that is easily used by humans. Clearly these are modern observations, so it would seem logical that animals would get a lot more sun exposure than a modern human. Therefore animal tissue would have more vit D.

      It's grandma, but you can call me sir.

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      • #4
        1



        Makes sense. If we can&#39;t get the vitamin D directly just kill an animal who&#39;s got some and eat him. I like it.

        Comment


        • #5
          1



          I like this response:

          http://freetheanimal.com/2010/02/the...mmon-cold.html

          Comment


          • #6
            1



            There is a simple way to get your vit D levels up, just get enough sunshine whenever possible. Mark has said that your body will store the D during the summer months when you&#39;re getting more so that during the winter months you can use what is stored in your fat when you burn that (vit D is fat soluble). So for me, I just go out and bask in the sun for 15-20 minutes whenever the sun is out.

            Comment


            • #7
              1



              kong, that might be true... but MOST people (Americans anyway) never get around to burning their body fat... so that stored D would be inaccessible, right?

              Good news for us primals though.

              Eating lots but still hungry? Eat more fat. Mid-day sluggishness? Eat more fat. Feeling depressed or irritable? Eat more fat. People think you've developed an eating disorder? Eat more fat... in front of them.

              Comment


              • #8
                1



                Tis true, tis true. More health benefits for us. Eventually the world will catch up with us.


                Maybe.

                Comment


                • #9
                  1



                  we can&#39;t all live where enough sun can be gotten during the summer months for use in winter months. so i will continue happily supplementing *and* eating meat.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    1



                    Wow. I hope that wasn&#39;t a typical quality column for Tara Parker-Pope. She&#39;s woefully uninformed about vitamin D. I like Richard&#39;s response on Free the Animal.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      1



                      @kongluirong


                      Last Friday it was -20F(windchill) here. Come "bask" with me haha!

                      Don't be a paleotard...

                      http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...oxidation.html

                      http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...torage-qa.html

                      http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/fat...rn-fat-qa.html

                      http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...-you-need.html

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        1



                        Hi! I&#39;m hoping that some knowledgeable folks can help me out with a recent vitamin D issue.


                        I moved to London (where there is little sunshine relative to my previous location), and recently started taking about 1,5000 IU of a vitamin D3 supplement. Within the first day or two, I&#39;ve experienced severe insomnia issues (awake until 7 am) and am regularly overheated in the evenings. After 3 days, I stopped taking it about 2 days ago.


                        I&#39;ve been reading up on the side-effects of vitamin D3 supplementation, and so far the information suggests that insomnia and sleeping difficulties are a side effect of vitamin D deficiency rather than a potential overdose (this seems unlikely considering my relatively low dose). I am a regular exerciser and nothing else in my diet or routine has changed. Does anyone have any tips or insights on how I may be able to counteract some of the negative effects on sleep? I&#39;m currently on 4 hours of sleep over 48 hours!


                        Apologies for the long message, and my intention is not to dissuade anyone from taking vitamin D3. I&#39;m sure it&#39;s very beneficial for a lot of people, this is personal reaction.


                        Thanks for your help!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          1



                          When did you take it? Taking it early usually helps that.

                          Mama to 4, wife to my love

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            1



                            lawrencemak, I&#39;ve read insomnia can be a side-effect of taking Vitamin D and it is suggested to take it earlier in the day. Try taking yours earlier and see if that helps. I take mine (10,000 IU) just before going to sleep and I still can&#39;t wake up in the morning

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              1



                              Thanks for the suggestions. I&#39;m not quite sure about the timing issue. At this point, I&#39;m not too keen on continuing to take it given the personal side-effects. On the days I did take it, I took it with food around 11 am or so. And, it&#39;s been two days since I last took it, and I&#39;m still feeling relatively affected. Maybe it&#39;s gotten to a point where I&#39;m psyching myself out a little bit around bed time?


                              So far, the preliminary (and probably relatively superficial) research I&#39;ve done hasn&#39;t offered up any helpful information. I&#39;m worried that since it&#39;s a fat soluble vitamin that the excess D3 will take a while to flush out and I&#39;ll be affected for a while. Is there any benefit to significantly increasing the amount of exercise and water intake in hopes that the D3 will flush out faster?


                              Thanks!

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