Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

My Kids Won't Eat

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
    When I was a kid, the invention of cheese sauce suddenly made vegetables my favorite food. I know it's not the healthiest thing, but it was my gateway to vegetables.
    +1 I agree. PUt veggies in stews as well. Also try homemade lemon caper sauce! Find sauces that they like and load it up. Try cooking them in lard too! Eggplant sauteed well done (so its gooey) cooked in lard (deskinned) is just fabulous. Then you can slowly reduce the amount of sauce as they are starting to develop a taste for them. Also try stuffing chicken/beef with the veggies when you roast them.. also put hte roasted drippings over the veggies.
    Primal since March 2011

    Female/29 years old/5' 1"/130ish lbs

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
      When I was a kid, the invention of cheese sauce suddenly made vegetables my favorite food. I know it's not the healthiest thing, but it was my gateway to vegetables.
      Meh, cheese is mostly saturated fat and whey protein. They're the two best for growth, assimilation and absorption. Nothing's better than dairy protein in terms of bioavailability - it even beats eggs - and the fatty acid profile of GOOD cheeses is fantastic, especially if you can get raw, grass fed cheese (hello, Trader Joe's!). I think cheese is plenty healthy as long as it's real, grass fed, preferably raw/organic and not abused, meaning you're not eating a block of cheese for dinner every night
      Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

      Comment


      • #33
        Yeah, but cheese SAUCE that they put in the boxed frozen veggies is full of flour and salt ... it has to be melted grated cheese, or make your own sauce...

        i miss cheese (casein intolerant, boo). It's worth the bloat every so often to have some LOL

        Comment


        • #34
          ^^^That goes without saying. I think most "cheese sauce" doesn't even have dairy in it...blech! Heat whole milk, melt down cheese slowly. THAT is real cheese sauce.
          Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

          Comment


          • #35
            With regard to your comment about your wife being sensitive to tastes/textures: this can be a sign of zinc deficiency. My middle child (7 last week) was incredibly fussy and had real problems with tastes and textures until a couple of months ago. After a couple of weeks of zinc supplementation she became a totally different eater and has started enjoying (rather than enduring) food. We no longer have the "How many bites do I have to eat?" (and her bites used to be the tiniest nibbles) or the endless chewing and struggling with food in her mouth.
            It might be an idea to get zinc drops for everyone?

            Comment


            • #36
              Keep trying! My son went on a NO BEEF strike for close to 4 months! I think he had a problem chewing/swallowing it once (he's 2) and decided not to eat it. Ever again.

              But all of a sudden he gobbles it up! "More steak, please." It's so weird, but great! He asks for more and more. Now my concern is that he's eating too much of my portion!

              Comment


              • #37
                Love this thread, great advice here people! I'm a month into primal and really struggling with my Mr12 and Miss8. Well to be fair, Miss8 isn't too bad, she will eat some salad foods. But Mr12 ... apart from some meats and cherry tomatoes, he won't go near a vegetable. He loves breads and grains

                However my biggest problem is that I am now separated (6 months ago) and while its amicable and the kids are taking it really well, my main worry is that if I manage to get my kids eating primal healthy - they are going to get high carb/high grain on the other side (we share custody 50/50). My ex is reasonably overweight and eats largely processed foods and grains. I don't see her responding to any advice I may give her on primal living.

                Thoughts on how I can tackle this problem??
                Buzz71
                Come visit my blog about life, my journey and seizing the day: www.thecarpediem.net
                Read my Journal of Awesomeness!
                Follow me on Twitter: @Buzz_71 and @the_CarpeDiem
                My Primal slow movement challenge: 208.29km of 1000km completed in 2012!

                Comment


                • #38
                  Hunger is the best spice. If they don't want to eat at dinner time, then they can go to bed hungry. They'll be eating whatever you serve them for breakfast at that point. In theory.
                  Crohn's, doing SCD

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    This is an interesting blog Maria's Nutritious and Delicious Journal that has loads of recipes that are healthy (no grain, refined sugar) alternatives to typical American foods (stuff that kids like : ) ). She does use dairy which I do not do but she uses it in moderation. All of the sugars that she uses are natural but do not trigger blood sugar ect... Check it out maybe there are something your kids will like. Good luck to you!

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      hey, they won't eat? let them not eat.

                      it's an intermittent fast.

                      when they are ready to eat again, you give them the primal and never look back.

                      simple.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        X2
                        Crohn's, doing SCD

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Knifegill View Post
                          X2
                          yea after i posted that i saw what you said a few posts up. same deal.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Hey OP,

                            You're doing a great thing, but it's tough - we struggle with one of ours in particular. I think having 5 kiddos would multiply the frustration at waste of time and effort enormously.

                            ITA on your idea of bringing dinner forward. Mine get a small snack on school pick up to walk home with (so, 3-3.30pm) then have to go hungry until dinner at 5.30pm. If they are starving, they get raw veges and some ham or cheese. If I am making something I'm pretty sure they will turn their noses up at, I will do a large platter of raw veges, ham, maybe some seeds etc. Also are you trying to prepare 'interesting' meals or just meat and veg? A friend gave me her take on food preparation for kids - there is an inverse relationship between how long you spend preparing the meal and the likelihood of them eating it. KISS principle. So while it is a little dull for us ATM, we do lots of meat and veg variations.

                            Mine also have a grab bag of minor sensory issues, neither ate any 'baby mush' - so we did baby led introduction to food before I'd ever heard of it. They also have a strong aversion to pumpkin and sweet potatoes (they both got this as a first mush food which was strongly rejected and, we think, imprinted on their psyches for all time!!). So don't rule this our either.

                            In our house, letting kids go to bed hungry is not an option (6 and 3yrs), because they have my metabolism and wake in the night with hunger pains and come downstairs. No 1 is particularly bad and her mood in the morning can just flip to ogre once those blood sugars get critical (which means I struggle to get her off to school coz her mood is set to 'bad').

                            Do you serve up their plates or let them serve themselves? I find mine will tend to try more if they get to select it themselves. Not as much as I would serve them - but self regulating their appetites is important to me (having had "clean the plate" drummed into me as a kid). Mine eat 1 piece of fruit after dinner - its not a 'reward' but if they are 'not hungry' they don't get it. Saw something on a kid's show they other day about having a "no thank you portion", where you have a taste and say 'no thank you' to the rest. I have been able to use this to my advantage!

                            I also wonder if it has become an 'issue' beyond the actual food. This can happen, esp w some personalities (like my no 1 and then the little one decided she could do it too!). This is where the self serve option is good. As MOTH (man of the house), you explain (not at the dinner table, some other time) that your job as parents is to provide nutritious food to ensure they have long and healthy lives (blah, blah). Then set the expectation that they will respect the effort that your wife has made to prepare the meal by trying a little of everything. Every time. No arguments or discussion at the table. No faces or disparaging comments about food. If they are not going to comply they need to sit quietly (I find if one complains it can be really off putting for the other) until it is time to leave the table. The last thing you want is your family table (an important bonding ritual) to be turned into a power struggle, so take the focus off the food and put it back on the family and ritual (I'm not religious, but showing appreciation for plentiful food is nice). My kids are well versed in nutritional info (we have eaten organic whole foods their entire lives) and often notice/comment on foods which provides me with further opportunity to educate them (just not at the table).

                            As far as replacing the sit down meal, I would say no. It has been shown (sorry, no links to hand, Australian research I think, need to access the filing system in my head for the source!) that families who sit down to a meal together have lower incidences of many social ills (teen drug use, promiscuity etc).

                            Anyway, know that you are not alone, that it is baby steps and you are giving your kids the gift of a long and healthy life (they will probably eat McD's 24/7 the first year they leave home, then revert to the default setting - your lessons in nutrition).

                            Good luck and keep us posted.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Buzz71 View Post
                              Love this thread, great advice here people! I'm a month into primal and really struggling with my Mr12 and Miss8. Well to be fair, Miss8 isn't too bad, she will eat some salad foods. But Mr12 ... apart from some meats and cherry tomatoes, he won't go near a vegetable. He loves breads and grains

                              However my biggest problem is that I am now separated (6 months ago) and while its amicable and the kids are taking it really well, my main worry is that if I manage to get my kids eating primal healthy - they are going to get high carb/high grain on the other side (we share custody 50/50). My ex is reasonably overweight and eats largely processed foods and grains. I don't see her responding to any advice I may give her on primal living.

                              Thoughts on how I can tackle this problem??
                              I have a similar situation, although I didn't go primal until I'd been divorced for several years and my daughter was 13. But we struggled for years with trying to teach her how to eat "healthy" and always getting chicken nuggets and CiCi's pizza at her dads My advice is, you simply CAN'T control what they eat at their mom's, so don't tear yourself up trying to, and don't make negative comments to your kids. Instead, EDUCATE them (gently) about why the foods you prepare are healthy, and talk about how they feel mentally and physically when they eat primal vs. junk. You may not be able to CONTROL their diet, but you can establish a framework of understanding as to what their choices mean. Even my daughter (who has split custody and is 16 now) has started to make better choices when she's with her dad because she knows that she feels better with meat and veggies than chicken nuggets and fries! We've even had the "low carb beats PMS" conversation and I think she's starting to believe me - largely because I don't flip out every month myself

                              And ... my condolences. Divorce sucks, even when it's the right thing to do. Best of luck to you ...

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by jimhensen View Post
                                My son is 3 and most likely autistic (he hasn't been officially diagnosed but it is extremely likely at this point). Unfortunately diet is something that he has a problem with and if I were try to just give him primal foods he would starve. It really depends on the child because not every kid is just going to eat what they are given.
                                Except I know several families with autistic children and their kids DO eat very now. It took a lot of work and was stressful in the beginning but your son WILL eat. I'm like a broken record. Check out the GAPS diet website and GAPS yahoo message board.
                                Picky Eaters | The Liberated Kitchen, LLC
                                Roo's Clues: Welcome to Our World

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X