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should we salt or not?

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  • should we salt or not?

    I know it makes everything taste better with salt, but do we actually need to add in extra salt?

    I keep reading different opinions, as to whether it is necessary or not, if it's harmful or not, and if it's better to add in MORE salt, or to avoid and use LESS.

    Off the top of my head, I believe Eades promotes the use of salt, while Cordain advises not to.

    Then there's the remineralizing of drinking water by adding in some salt...

    Am confused about how much is too much.

    Thoughts?
    SW: 68 kg. * CW: 61.5 kg. * GW: 60 kg or less...
    “Your work is to discover your work and then with all your heart to give yourself to it.” ~ Buddha

  • #2
    I liberally salt and have no blood pressure issues. YMMV

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    • #3
      Ditto, but moderate salt.

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      • #4
        I haven't changed my salt intake habits at all. Put salt on stuff when it needs it. But you may find you need less salt as you can actual taste things better when they're not coated or smothered in other things. Just my experience.
        “It's a lifestyle--train like there's no finish line".

        Army Officer by day.
        Practicing Crossfitter, Yogi, Chef and Hiker by night.

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        • #5
          Heard coarse salt maintains the minerals...but not fine salt.
          Any Other Primal Beings From Singapore?

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          • #6
            I don't have any references at the moment, but apparently the concern about salt and blood pressure is more often a potassium deficiency, as the sodium/potassium ratio gets skewed towards sodium and causes hypertension... or something.

            The other problem is that your tastebuds can get accustomed to it, so that it takes more salt to get the same level of saltiness.

            I think salt is necessary- my wife gets cravings for it sometimes, so we definitely need it, and I think that low sodium levels can cause problems as well. Even animals often go nuts for salt blocks left outside.

            My rules:
            1. Use good sea salt, with lots of other minerals in it.
            2. Use it moderately, when needed.
            3. Eat primally to get plenty of other minerals.

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            • #7
              unless you are 3% of the population excess salt is excreted in your urine. if you are that 3% it will kill you.
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              • #8
                I think it depends. In the summer, my electrolytes get all out of whack because I'm seriously sweating for 6-10 hours a day, 6 days a week. Yeah, in that case I can use some extra (good) salt or I get a migraine. During the winter, I really don't sweat at all, so I don't as much.

                I also think that cutting out processed foods can lower your salt intake anyway, so I'm not sure if I would supplement, but I wouldn't be worried about having some.
                Durp.

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                • #9
                  Depends on the salt~ sodium chloride (AKA Morton's) Yikes, no!! But unprocessed sea salt?? It really has made a positive difference in my life~ especially in summer, here in hell~

                  Critical Salt Info

                  from http://curezone.com/foods/saltcure.asp

                  Vital Functions of Salt in the Body

                  1. Salt is most effective in stabilizing irregular heartbeats and, Contrary to the misconception that it causes high blood pressure, it is actually essential for the regulation of blood pressure - in conjunction with water. Naturally the proportions are critical.

                  2. Salt is vital to the extraction of excess acidity from the cells in the body, particularly the brain cells.

                  3. Salt is vital for balancing the sugar levels in the blood; a needed element in diabetics.

                  4. Salt is vital for the generation of hydroelectric energy in cells in the body. It is used for local power generation at the sites of energy need by the cells.

                  5. Salt is vital to the nerve cells' communication and information processing all the time that the brain cells work, from the moment of conception to death.

                  6. Salt is vital for absorption of food particles through the intestinal tract.

                  7. Salt is vital for the clearance of the lungs of mucus plugs and sticky phlegm, particularly in asthma and cystic fibrosis.

                  8. Salt is vital for clearing up catarrh and congestion of the sinuses.

                  9. Salt is a strong natural antihistamine.

                  10. Salt is essential for the prevention of muscle cramps.

                  11. Salt is vital to prevent excess saliva production to the point that it flows out of the mouth during sleep. Needing to constantly mop up excess saliva indicates salt shortage.

                  12. Salt is absolutely vital to making the structure of bones firm. Osteoporosis, in a major way, is a result of salt and water shortage in the body.

                  13. Salt is vital for sleep regulation. It is a natural hypnotic.

                  14. Salt is a vitally needed element in the treatment of diabetics.

                  15. Salt on the tongue will stop persistent dry coughs.

                  16. Salt is vital for the prevention of gout and gouty arthritis.

                  17. Salt is vital for maintaining sexuality and libido.

                  18. Salt is vital for preventing varicose veins and spider veins on the legs and thighs.

                  19. Salt is vital to the communication and information processing nerve cells the entire time that the brain cells work - from the moment of conception to death.

                  20. Salt is vital for reducing a double chin. When the body is short of salt, it means the body really is short of water. The salivary glands sense the salt shortage and are obliged to produce more saliva to lubricate the act of chewing and swallowing and also to supply the stomach with water that it needs for breaking down foods. Circulation to the salivary glands increases and the blood vessels become "leaky" in order to supply the glands with water to manufacture saliva. The "leakiness" spills beyond the area of the glands themselves, causing increased bulk under the skin of the chin, the cheeks and into the neck.

                  21. Sea salt contains about 80 mineral elements that the body needs. Some of these elements are needed in trace amounts. Unrefined sea salt is a better choice of salt than other types of salt on the market. Ordinary table salt that is bought in the super markets has been stripped of its companion elements and contains additive elements such as aluminum silicate to keep it powdery and porous. Aluminum is a very toxic element in our nervous system. It is implicated as one of the primary causes of Alzheimer's disease.

                  22. Twenty-seven percent of the body's salt is in the bones. Osteoporosis results when the body needs more salt and takes it from the body. Bones are twenty-two percent water. Is it not obvious what happens to the bones when we're deficient in salt or water or both.
                  Last edited by Nady; 12-17-2011, 09:39 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Celtic sea salt! And then you can have as much as you want. So many minerals, so good for you. You may be a little thirstier, though...
                    Making adventure out of this thing called life

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                    • #11
                      You can put me in the pro-salt camp. I love Real Salt. It tastes great and has a bit of mineral in it. My blood pressure is fine, too.

                      I swear sometimes that our ideas about healthy eating in the US are rooted in the puritanical idea that anything pleasurable must be bad.

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                      • #12
                        I salt foods, but if I'm eating a salty cut like bacon or ham I don't salt.

                        I know a lot of people don't use salt because supposedly grok didn't eat salt. I'm not so sure about that. I grew up in the boonies and occasionally we'd find 'rocks' in our woods that deer and probably other animals liked to lick. My dad tried one and said it tasted salty. So if other animals seek out salty substances wouldn't grok do the same?

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                        • #13
                          As everybody know, salt is very important for the taste of food but if you added more then it may cause some unwanted health issues like you may get more sweating.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Linny View Post
                            I salt foods, but if I'm eating a salty cut like bacon or ham I don't salt.

                            I know a lot of people don't use salt because supposedly grok didn't eat salt. I'm not so sure about that. I grew up in the boonies and occasionally we'd find 'rocks' in our woods that deer and probably other animals liked to lick. My dad tried one and said it tasted salty. So if other animals seek out salty substances wouldn't grok do the same?
                            I think salt was always sought after ~ and yes, I believe Grok hunted mineral/salt just like all the other land animals~after all, we came from the sea and still have 'salty' tears, blood etc.
                            Originally posted by Flower View Post
                            As everybody know, salt is very important for the taste of food but if you added more then it may cause some unwanted health issues like you may get more sweating.
                            Actually, I use salt because it prevents excess sweating~ here in the desert in summer, it's easy to lose too many electrolytes through perspiration~ and believe me, heat exhaustion is not fun! The sea salt replaces the trace minerals in the proper ratio~

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Nady View Post
                              Depends on the salt~ sodium chloride (AKA Morton's) Yikes, no!! But unprocessed sea salt?? It really has made a positive difference in my life~ especially in summer, here in hell~

                              Critical Salt Info
                              Aside from these 80 trace minerals that you claim it has, what is another benefit of sea salt over regular?

                              Sea salt vs regular salt, to me, has always been another case of "fancy people buy the more expensive stuff that is no better and sometimes even worse". I will admit a lack of research though, so what do you know?

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