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sugar in my salt?!

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  • sugar in my salt?!



    I've been lurking here for a while, but I just came across something so frustrating that I needed to join and post.


    For those who use the iconic Morton's salt AND/OR sea salt, stop. It has dextrose on the ingredients list. also, I'd avoid the salt shakers at all restaurants seeing as they probably use Morton's brand. I never thought my salt would have anything other than salt (or iodine) in it. I'm sure most people have switched to kosher or sea salt, but I just thought I'd share.


  • #2
    1



    I also found that where there's salt, there's sugar. It seems like they are both used because they tend to balance flavors with each other in many dishes. I don't do boxed or can goods, but I can tell when they add sugar to my food in restaurants.

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    • #3
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      sea salt ... that is so lame about the dextrose !!!

      PrimalMom
      Check out my new blog at http://primalmom.blogspot.com

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      • #4
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        Seriously! I'm going to bring my extra salt grinder to work because all we have is the mortons, and just the consistency seems weird to me now after grinding pure sea salt.


        Diane, that's one of the reasons I don't eat out much anymore either (or buy boxed or canned "food"): since restaurants put sugar in EVERYTHING it means they also have to oversalt to compensate. Hence the outrageous sodium levels in restaurant food. You'd think they could just stop adding sugar to every dish and start using more spices than just salt...oh well, cooking at home is better and cheaper anyway

        You are what you eat,
        and what you eat eats too - Michael Pollan

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        • #5
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          This sucks! I never realized this. Lately I've been sticking with Hain's sea salt or Kosher rock salt for cooking.

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          • #6
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            I looked for sea salt at the grocery store the other day but ALL of them had some additive or other (like anti-caking agents...) Will look for Celtic sea salt in my local co-op.

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            • #7
              1



              Chill out! Stop acting like a headless chicken(s). For Pete's sake, how much dextrose do you think is in that serving of salt? Almost zip-ola! That's why it's way down near or at the end of the list of ingredients.


              As I've tried to point out here, it is not just WHAT, it is HOW MUCH. There isn't even enough dextrose to show up (as carbohydrate)in the nutritional analysis for a CUP of salt. Eaten that much lately?


              Dextrose is a form of glucose, just like you might get eating a piece of fruit.


              And why are you salting your food anyway?


              Get a grip...........

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              • #8
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                You know what OTB, some people care about all the extra stuff in packaged foods. I generally try not to let myself be irked by you, but you have got to stop being so condescending about what other people care about. You may not be worried about the trace amounts of this chemical or that chemical that winds up in your body, and you've clearly demonstrated in other threads that you follow your own idea of PB with a focus on weightloss rather than the idea as a whole. All the way down to eating whole, minimally processed foods, and grass fed and pastured animals from local sources. It is rude of you to be so demeaning when not having unnecessarily added ingredients is important to some of us. Real salt is gathered from the earth with no processing involved other than breaking it up and putting it in a container, and that has value to a lot of people. Just because it has no value to you doesn't give you permission to tell us to "get a grip."

                You are what you eat,
                and what you eat eats too - Michael Pollan

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                • #9
                  1



                  Fine hannahc, but don't confuse emotion with ration and pretend the former is the latter.


                  Yes, that mode of "thinking" does drive me absolutely nuts. It's not a difference of opinion of quantifiable fact with a reaction. Should I affirm such fears? Should I just nod when someone says the earth is flat? I think not.


                  A few micrograms of dextrose in salt - which if you are primal you aren't adding anyway - is NOT going to hurt ANYone. To think otherwise elevates the dextrose to the same as eating a pound of arsenic or something. There are more important and less important things to be concerned about, scientifically, rationally, but not emotionally. No?


                  And dextrose is not one to not be concerned about.

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                  • #10
                    1



                    You can have the last word if you want, because I can only assume that you somehow need to, but this has nothing to do with emotion taking the place of rational thinking. That is another example of your demeaning and condescending attitude towards people who hold different values and opinions than you do. It's completely rational to make a decision to buy minimally processed foods. I have no emotion about sea salt. It doesn't make me happy or sad or angry. I think it is unnecessary for there to be any ingredients other than salt in my salt. I believe that restaurants, as a whole, use too much salt and sugar in the meals they prepare, as compared to the meals that many people make in their own homes. I would like to bring my own sea salt to work to lightly salt my hard boiled eggs. Emotional? Not a bit. My own thoughts and opinions? Completely. Why are your "rational" thoughts better than anyone else's? Why do you put "thinking" in quotations as if we aren't actually "thinking" at all? You don't have to care about the dextrose in your salt, but stop talking down to other people because they do. Just because we don't value the same qualities in the foods we choose to buy and consume doesn't mean our thoughts and opinions aren't as valid as yours. You can present your ideas in any conversation, because that's what these forums are for, but the sarcasm and rudeness, such as "Chill out!" and "Get a grip..." are completely unnecessary.

                    You are what you eat,
                    and what you eat eats too - Michael Pollan

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                    • #11
                      1



                      (you knew I'd be along eventually


                      From morton's site:
                      [quote]


                      In 1924 Morton became the first company to produce iodized salt for the table in order to reduce the incidence of simple goiter. Dextrose is added to stabilize the iodide. Iodine is vital to the proper functioning of the thyroid gland and the prevention of goiter. Actually, the amount of dextrose in salt is so small that it is dietetically insignificant. Morton® Iodized Table Salt contains 0.04 percent dextrose or 40 milligrams per 100 grams of salt. Morton® Plain Table Salt contains neither iodine nor dextrose. All Morton Salt products containing potassium iodide are labeled as such. </blockquote>


                      I am concerned about what I put in my body. Iodine is one of the things that I pay attention to since thyroid function is critical to health. This topic has been explored (debated) in other threads and I don&#39;t see an alternative to iodized salt just yet. Sea vegetables are alternative, but I don&#39;t find those in my produce section. Some sort of supplement made of kelp would work I&#39;m sure, but I am actually concerned about getting too much and causing hyperthyroidism if I were to start supplementing. So, I figure it aint broke so don&#39;t fix it. Until I find and feel comfortable with a more natural alternative, I&#39;m going to stick with iodized salt.

                      It's grandma, but you can call me sir.

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                      • #12
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                        In this article, unrefined sea-salt is mentioned as a source of Iodine:


                        http://www.westonaprice.org/basicnut...ralprimer.html

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                        • #13
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                          Thanks, maba. This was debated in the other thread. Every analysis of sea salt showed a very small amount of iodine. Some who say that american shouldn&#39;t have to worry about it since we eat so much processed and prepared food that we don&#39;t need to add it at the table. But we don&#39;t eat those things. Besides I was never really sure if when a package says salt it means iodized salt.


                          It seems that iodine is unstable so, how the sea salt is made seems to matter -- as does the age and storage of your mortons (which is why they add dextrose)

                          It's grandma, but you can call me sir.

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                          • #14
                            1

                            [quote]

                            Yes, that mode of "thinking" does drive me absolutely nuts. It&#39;s not a difference of opinion of quantifiable fact with a reaction. Should I affirm such fears? Should I just nod when someone says the earth is flat? I think not
                            </blockquote>


                            OTB, aren&#39;t you a Quaker? It must be hard to compatibilize your rationality and critical thinking with Quakerism.


                            About iodine intake, yogurt, eggs and strawberries seem to be good sources of it. Not as good as kelp but apparently enough.


                            http://tinyurl.com/lavqh4


                            The above being said, it is so annoying to have to become label-obsessed to make sure I am getting what I think I&#39;m getting. Having to look at the label of salt to make sure it&#39;s salt is ridiculous. That&#39;s why I also buy Celtic salt when I can.


                            Also, I&#39;m curious about what makes salt qualify as Kosher for a Rabbi.

                            “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
                            "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
                            "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

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                            • #15
                              1



                              I believe kosher salt is just a style of salt. A salt with a large grain. I don&#39;t think it necessarily means that it is *kosher*.

                              It's grandma, but you can call me sir.

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