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Cold pressed rapeseed oil

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  • Cold pressed rapeseed oil

    I didn't know you could get it but my local supermarket has two different varieties. Without involving hexane or other chemical extraction techniques, is it considered healthy? I assume that lectins are no longer an issue in this form?

  • #2
    It's still a seed oil that is very high in PUFA's. There are many better options out there, this shouldn't even be considered.

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    • #3
      The major concern with rapeseed (and canola) is the abundance of erucic acid which has a number of toxic effects (heart lesions in rats).

      Lectins are proteins so only trace amounts could exist in an oil.
      http://thepaleopremise.blogspot.com

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      • #4
        It can stay on the shelf in that case. I'm already hypersensitive enough to food and toxins so don't need any added problems. Thanks for your advice.

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        • #5
          Rapeseed has had its name unofficially changed to canola, for marketing purposes. It's usually (over 80%) genetically modified by Monsanto (most evil corporation ever, perhaps) to be tolerant of high levels of glyphosate, which is a pretty potent toxin that is getting into our environment.

          Don't encourage the bastards.

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          • #6
            Wtf? Why? Why? Why would you even consider it? What possible advantage foes it have over food?

            Would you buy "all natural, organic cyanide"?
            Lifting Journal

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Stevenhamley View Post
              The major concern with rapeseed (and canola) is the abundance of erucic acid which has a number of toxic effects (heart lesions in rats).
              Originally posted by jfreaksho View Post
              Rapeseed has had its name unofficially changed to canola, for marketing purposes. It's usually (over 80%) genetically modified by Monsanto (most evil corporation ever, perhaps) to be tolerant of high levels of glyphosate, which is a pretty potent toxin that is getting into our environment.
              Canola was a strain of rapeseed selectively bred (not GM) decades ago to be very low in Erucic Acid and thus safe for human consumption. (as opposed to toxic natural rapeseed oil used industrially). More recently Monsanto did Roundup Ready Canola, and just entering the market are other genetically modified edible Rapeseed strains with very different fatty acid profiles than 'canola'. (50% less PUFA, higher Oleic, etc...)

              With that said, its not the best choice of oil. Among oils to avoid its better than Soy & Corn, but not something I'd buy a bottle of.

              Go with Olive oils (virgin & light/mild) or coconut oil if you need oil. If you must have a seed oil, High & Mid Oleic Sunflower / Safflower are the best choices I've seen commercially available.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Apex Predator View Post
                Wtf? Why? Why? Why would you even consider it? What possible advantage foes it have over food?

                Would you buy "all natural, organic cyanide"?
                Hi. Devil's advocate here. Here is why someone MIGHT use canola oil: it makes a pretty cheap and tasty mayonnaise. Mayo really needs a neutral oil base, IMO.

                However, if cheap isn't your problem, then using a 50/50 mix of "light" olive oil and steam-deodorized coconut oil yields the same result without resorting to canola.

                I also occasionally run into recipes that call for the ubiquitous "vegetable oil". If it's a baked good, I melt butter or coconut oil (again, deodorized). If it's a salad, I use olive oil. But making those conversions took trial and error.

                What I don't understand is how cold-pressed makes canola any better. It's nasty tasting stuff on its own. That's why you need the hexane. It must be sanitized with heavy duty chemicals for us to eat it.

                Unless someone has bred the taste out of it, but even then -- what everyone else said. There are better fats to be used.
                Steph
                My Primal Meanderings

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by onalark View Post
                  Hi. Devil's advocate here. Here is why someone MIGHT use canola oil: it makes a pretty cheap and tasty mayonnaise. Mayo really needs a neutral oil base, IMO.

                  However, if cheap isn't your problem, then using a 50/50 mix of "light" olive oil and steam-deodorized coconut oil yields the same result without resorting to canola.

                  I also occasionally run into recipes that call for the ubiquitous "vegetable oil". If it's a baked good, I melt butter or coconut oil (again, deodorized). If it's a salad, I use olive oil. But making those conversions took trial and error.

                  What I don't understand is how cold-pressed makes canola any better. It's nasty tasting stuff on its own. That's why you need the hexane. It must be sanitized with heavy duty chemicals for us to eat it.

                  Unless someone has bred the taste out of it, but even then -- what everyone else said. There are better fats to be used.
                  Generally things labeled as cold-pressed, and that are insanely niche aren't cheap.
                  Lifting Journal

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Apex Predator View Post
                    Generally things labeled as cold-pressed, and that are insanely niche aren't cheap.
                    So what?

                    I'm not a fan of anything that you have to both bleach AND deodorize in order for you to be able to eat it. There was a segment on "How It's Made" about canola oil.

                    Personally, for a quick, neutral, high-heat oil, I use grapeseed oil by La Tourangelle.
                    Read. The. Book.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Satch12879 View Post
                      So what?

                      I'm not a fan of anything that you have to both bleach AND deodorize in order for you to be able to eat it. There was a segment on "How It's Made" about canola oil.

                      Personally, for a quick, neutral, high-heat oil, I use grapeseed oil by La Tourangelle.
                      That was in response the the suggestion it was a *cheap* flavorless oil for mayo.
                      Lifting Journal

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                      • #12
                        I like rapeseed oil - it is great for lighting the fire in the morning (I am heating with wood) - and it is much more environmently friendly than petroleum based stuff. Hey wait, were you asking about actually using it for cooking :-) ?!?

                        Joking aside - I just dont think it is a good oil for a number of reasons that other people have laready alluded to
                        http://thorfalk.wordpress.com

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                        • #13
                          I use canola oil to oil door hinges. That's all it's good for in any variety. The issue is the lipid/acid content of the seed itself, so all the processing in the world won't make it any better.

                          If you need a mayo oil, look for avocado oil, macadamia nut oil or a light olive oil. Personally, if I ate mayo (which I don't), I'd just use extra virgin olive oil because I'm a real man and can handle it. Your move
                          Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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