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Fats and Carbs together

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  • Fats and Carbs together

    I have read many places that you shouldn't mix fat and carbs in a meal. That you should only eat carbs + protein, or fat + protein.

    How important is this? Why can't you eat just carbs and fat in a meal? Does it stall weight loss? I am trying to lose weight but I am just don't understand the reasoning or how it makes you gain weight.

    I usually would eat protein and veggies as carbs with fat. So usually I eat a little of all three (protein, veggies (carb) and and healthy fats) about 2-3 meals a day. Am I doing it all wrong? I am just wondering the science or reasoning behind it all.
    Last edited by primalprincess7; 11-11-2011, 04:36 PM.
    I'm too stubborn to give up so I keep on trying.

    You're never going to get to the top of the stairs if you don't walk up them.

  • #2
    you will gain weight if you consistently eat carbs AND fat. I'm not talking 0 carb meals with high fat, I'm talking eating 200g carbs or more, and 200 fat, you get the idea right?
    That's why you can lose weight on a high carb/low fat diet, as well as a low carb/high fat diet. High carb/high fat = weight gain.
    --Trish (Bork)
    TROPICAL TRADITIONS REFERRAL # 7625207
    http://pregnantdiabetic.blogspot.com
    FOOD PORN BLOG! http://theprimaljunkfoodie.blogspot.com

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    • #3
      If you spike your insulin while your bloodstream contains a lot of fatty acids, your body will store the fat.

      Insulin is normally spiked by high levels of blood glucose (although fast-digesting protein like whey protein can also do it). So combinations like mashed potatoes with butter, ice cream, etc. can cause rapid weight gain.

      Non-starchy vegetables, however, do not appreciably raise your blood glucose or elicit an insulin spike. So even though they are technically carbs, you can safely consume them with fat.

      Does that make sense?

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      • #4
        hmm yeh it makes sense. I always love your guys' posts,^^ they are always so well said!

        Oh wait, so what if you eat a sweet potato with butter?it is starchy right? or if you ate a piece of fruit with some fat? that is not good? I do not eat fruit and if I do it is berries. But I don't really like fruit anymore. I am just saying, in theory. I probably sound so dumb lol
        Last edited by primalprincess7; 11-11-2011, 05:29 PM.
        I'm too stubborn to give up so I keep on trying.

        You're never going to get to the top of the stairs if you don't walk up them.

        Comment


        • #5
          Don't think you've got to worry about the sweet potato w/ butter. Think (especially) processed and dessert type foods. Deep fat fried white potatoes, donuts, etc. Bad carbs and bad fats together.
          Trying a journal. We'll see how long that lasts....

          http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread37152.html

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          • #6
            Thanks primalprincess! Yes, a sweet potato with butter would be a mix of glucose and fat. But like Dr. Bork says, a little bit of mixing is not a problem. There's a small amount of butter mixed into my post-workout mashed potatoes, but I still tend to lose weight overnight. Berries are also a great carb choice for workout days.

            I really enjoy loading up on fat on rest days, and starch and berries on workout days. Gives me something new to look forward to each day.

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            • #7
              There's probably some other data, too, but diet studies have shown that people can lose weight better on either low carb or low fat. Others say that it isn't merely carbs and fat, but carbs and omega 6 fats. Berries and cream are better than a baked potato with sour cream, and better than cheesecake with whipped cream.

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              • #8
                If you want specifics as to what happens on the biochemical level when you combine the two I'd recommend Good Calories, Bad Calories by Gary Taubes, he explains it pretty comprehensively I think. but the jist of the story is that your body stores fat by making and storing triglycerides. Triglycerides are made up of three fatty acid components and a glycerol component that binds them together. The glycerol component is made from glucose, so the idea is that if you restrict glucose intake you can restrict glycerol production which restricts triglyceride production. Eating carbohydrates triggers the insulin response that signals your body to use the incoming glucose to make triglycerides. If you eat both fat and carbohydrate you are giving your body everything it needs to make and store fat, including the hormonal signals to do just that.

                Restricting fat works in a similar way, but replacing fat with carbohydrate leads to all sorts of health problems, which also get discussed in Good Calories, Bad Calories, and in paleo/primal blogs.

                hope this helps!

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                • #9
                  Thanks for the great responses! This is very interesting. Isn't every day a workout day? I have a great fitness program schedule I follow which is basically lifting weights and HIIT . 3 HIIT and 3 weight days and 1 day off. So I should eat starchy carbs after the weight days only? I feel stupid because I was always in great health and then I got sick and my thryoid and hormones and PCOS issues all came about. And now I am questioning everything and over thinking it. I know how to do it but I research and then confuse myself. Also it is a big mess and harder with all the hormone/health issues but I know they are reversible and can be managed. I just have yet to perfect it consistently. I will never give up though or stop trying, not in my nature!

                  There's a small amount of butter mixed into my post-workout mashed potatoes, but I still tend to lose weight overnight. Berries are also a great carb choice for workout days.
                  Men seem to have it so easy! haha
                  I'm too stubborn to give up so I keep on trying.

                  You're never going to get to the top of the stairs if you don't walk up them.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by primalprincess7 View Post
                    Men seem to have it so easy! haha
                    LOL... I'm afraid that's true!

                    As for eating starchy carbs every day if you work out hard six days a week, I'm actually not sure. Personally, I only work out hard for three days. I've tried six in the past but my body just couldn't handle the abuse. My lifts stalled and I couldn't lose weight. When I converted my cardio days to recovery days (lots of walking and some very mild carrying and sprints), the plateau ended.

                    For those gifted people who can patch up overnight from a heavy workout, I suppose carbs after every day's workout would make sense. Then your dinner could be high-fat, low-carb I suppose. Any other perspectives on this?

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                    • #11
                      Hmmm I could work out less! lol
                      I'm too stubborn to give up so I keep on trying.

                      You're never going to get to the top of the stairs if you don't walk up them.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Timothy View Post
                        LOL... I'm afraid that's true!

                        As for eating starchy carbs every day if you work out hard six days a week, I'm actually not sure. Personally, I only work out hard for three days. I've tried six in the past but my body just couldn't handle the abuse. My lifts stalled and I couldn't lose weight. When I converted my cardio days to recovery days (lots of walking and some very mild carrying and sprints), the plateau ended.

                        For those gifted people who can patch up overnight from a heavy workout, I suppose carbs after every day's workout would make sense. Then your dinner could be high-fat, low-carb I suppose. Any other perspectives on this?
                        By definition, no one can work out hard every day, since the most accurate definition of working out hard is one that takes significant time to recover from. Rippetoe covers this extensively in Practical Programming- untrained people and beginners actually lack the muscle recruitment to be able to work hard and advanced trainees actually schedule their routines around a small amount of truely hard workouts and lots of rest. </tangent>

                        Anyway, I think too much is made of the macro-nutrient mixing. It may matter more for people on either side of the bell curve- that is people trying to get from 7% BF to 5% and people who have very damaged metabolisms. But I don't think it's worth worrying about for most people. Just my opinion and experience.
                        Lifting Journal

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by primalprincess7 View Post
                          Hmmm I could work out less! lol
                          Yeah, please get rid of those 2 extra HIIT days that aren't doing you any favors. Eat more steak instead. I'm serious.
                          I used to seriously post here, now I prefer to troll.

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                          • #14
                            I think too the fat and carbs digest at different speeds and cause some gut problems which radiate outward. Fat moves more slowly than carbs, especially 'low rent' carbs and so the carbs break down and start to turn bad inside the intestinal tract while the fat digests nice and slow. This allows for more absorption of what is essentially rotten food as it slides down the tracts. I think I got the gist anyway. I'm just learning about it too, trying my hand at making some homemade probiotics and it seems to be a 'thing' in the gut health community.

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                            • #15
                              Fat actually slows down the glucose "hit" of a starchy carb, easing the insulin spike in doing so. I think a fat with carb is fine in normal amounts. It is also easier on your blood glucose levels.

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