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miracle noodle: a stupid ploy?

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  • miracle noodle: a stupid ploy?



    does anyone know anything about the "miracle noodle" i'm hearing about? how can anything be zero calories?

    here is a link:

    http://www.miraclenoodle.com/index-new.html

    i hate to even ask, but is it even close to primal, or even natural?

    i'll give anyone who can tell me about this thing one dollar.

    go!


  • #2
    1



    primal/natural? no way.


    like... from the miracle noodle vine? haha.

    Eating lots but still hungry? Eat more fat. Mid-day sluggishness? Eat more fat. Feeling depressed or irritable? Eat more fat. People think you've developed an eating disorder? Eat more fat... in front of them.

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    • #3
      1



      Whatever it is, it still tastes like nothing, so why bother.

      .`.><((((> .`.><((((>.`.><((((>.`.><(( ((>
      ><((((> .`.><((((>.`.><((((>.`.><(( ((>

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      • #4
        1



        mmm spaghetti squash.

        Eating lots but still hungry? Eat more fat. Mid-day sluggishness? Eat more fat. Feeling depressed or irritable? Eat more fat. People think you've developed an eating disorder? Eat more fat... in front of them.

        Comment


        • #5
          1



          "Miracle" anything is a scam, whether emotional, dietary, or financial.


          One great way to determine if a food is primal is to gauge how much advertising is invested into it.

          Comment


          • #6
            1



            One great way to determine if a food is primal is to gauge how much advertising is invested into it.

            Never really thought about that...but it&#39;s incredibly true!

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            • #7
              1



              <shudder>

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              • #8
                1



                Mark had a poll about this a while ago... http://www.marksdailyapple.com/dear-readers-3/


                I think it&#39;s a sensible vice but not primal... I ordered a 20 pack and tried it... not overly impressed with the taste or texture... but it wasn&#39;t bad. Neither my wife and I gained any weight or felt bloating like other typical noodles. This product supposedly has no carbs or calories?... go figure... I have never reordered after my first order as I didn&#39;t think it was all that, but it is a decent substitute for noodles once in a while if you must have it.

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                • #9
                  1



                  oh geez, really? How many of you know what it even is? Someone just marketed something that is very common in Asia. I&#39;ve tried them once, and they&#39;re not very appetizing. They&#39;re basically all fiber that&#39;s why they say "no calorie and all that jazz". Just funny how everyone jumps on the negative side of things when they hear a marketing name. I am not for or against them, but it&#39;s far from a "ploy", they just added a fancy name to a food that is eaten regularly.

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                  • #10
                    1



                    Kaizen, just because it&#39;s eaten regularly doesn&#39;t mean that it&#39;s primal/natural or good. I agree with you that it&#39;s a "food", not a "ploy," but I think it&#39;s a food in the same way that cheesy puffs are food... highly processed and unnatural.

                    Eating lots but still hungry? Eat more fat. Mid-day sluggishness? Eat more fat. Feeling depressed or irritable? Eat more fat. People think you've developed an eating disorder? Eat more fat... in front of them.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      1



                      I never said it was primal, just irritated me that everyone jumps on the negative band wagon when they&#39;re clearly trying to market a healthy food. It&#39;s basically pure fiber, it&#39;s good for you, but by primal standards it&#39;s not something "allowed". Mark himself said it, it&#39;s a sensible vice, and good substitute if you want some good noodles. Personally I&#39;d rather have a nice bowl of soba noodles, but that&#39;s me.


                      Anyways, clever marketing doesn&#39;t make something less or more primal. How many ads have we seen for water? or back when they used to have so many commercials/ads for beef. Lots of healthy foods get marketed, doesn&#39;t mean they&#39;re less primal. How about we suggest if their primal, by the actual food?

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                      • #12
                        1



                        Personally I love these noodles as part of Sukiyaki; they absorb the flavor of the broth. But then again I got them when I was growing up in So Cal; we had to make special trips to J Town to get stuff like this.

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                        • #13
                          1

                          [quote]

                          Anyways, clever marketing doesn&#39;t make something less or more primal. How many ads have we seen for water? or back when they used to have so many commercials/ads for beef. Lots of healthy foods get marketed, doesn&#39;t mean they&#39;re less primal. How about we suggest if their primal, by the actual food? </blockquote>


                          My comment was not completely inclusive; rather, it is just a general rule of thumb that I find helpful. Food marketing generally follows food processing. The basic tenets of a primal diet are whole animal products and vegetables, none of which require any sort of processing by food manufacturers.


                          The beef industry&#39;s advertising campaign is still an example of marketing unhealthy food, as this promotes factory-farmed cattle. While not nearly as detrimental as HFCS-laden cereals and such, factory-farmed beef is still not an ideal food source.


                          Also, what about these noodles is actually good for you? Fiber is overrated, and the utter lack of any caloric or nutritive value leaves me wondering where the actual benefit lies. I suppose if you eat only to fill your belly, perhaps you may find some good in them. However, if you are eating to nourish your body, these noodles are nothing more than a worthless marketing ploy.

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                          • #14
                            1



                            "However, if you are eating to nourish your body, these noodles are nothing more than a worthless marketing ploy. "


                            but do the noodles&#39; packages/advertising claim to nourish your body?? I don&#39;t think they do. I think they claim to "nothing" your body, which is about what they do... you eat them, then you poop them out (mmm fiber).

                            I think they&#39;re for people who want noodles without actually wanting NOODLES and everything that comes with noodles... so yeah, just to chew, and fill your belly, but not worry about calories/carbs/insulin/whatnot.


                            Still, I&#39;m with you in principle. I&#39;d rather nourish my body most of the time, so I&#39;m not likely to ever eat these nothing noodles.

                            Eating lots but still hungry? Eat more fat. Mid-day sluggishness? Eat more fat. Feeling depressed or irritable? Eat more fat. People think you've developed an eating disorder? Eat more fat... in front of them.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              1

                              [quote]

                              but do the noodles&#39; packages/advertising claim to nourish your body?? I don&#39;t think they do. I think they claim to "nothing" your body, which is about what they do...</blockquote>


                              Good point; in truth, the marketing is accurate as the noodles really do the nothing that they promise. My response was more directed at Kaizen&#39;s statement, which I should have included for clarity:
                              [quote]

                              ...everyone jumps on the negative band wagon when they&#39;re clearly trying to market a healthy food. It&#39;s basically pure fiber, it&#39;s good for you... </blockquote>


                              I just don&#39;t understand how something that is a complete nutritional void can be considered a healthy food that is good for you.


                              Of course, in no way am I advocating only strictly consuming food for nutrition purposes all of the time. But I guess that I prefer my visceral pleasures with a flavor of cocoa or pinot noir.

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