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Organic Greek Yoghurt with Honey - Primal or not?

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  • Organic Greek Yoghurt with Honey - Primal or not?

    Folks!

    New to primal and new to the forum! Loving the lifestyle so far!

    Just wondering if anyone could tell me if this yoghurt is considered to be a primal food.

    Its Rachels Organic Greek Style honey bio-live yoghurt

    Nutritional Info:

    Per 100g
    128kcal
    Carb 12.6g (of which sugars 12.6)
    Fat 7.2g (of which saturates 4.4g)

    Many thanks
    Geoff
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Hey Geoff,
    Depends. Mark would say not, as added honey is still added sugar and will give you the same insulin spike, and he says dairy itself should be a food enjoyed in moderation, not a staple. But you could argue that honey is in principle a primal food as it would have been available to early humans to some extent, although probably not on a daily basis.

    So if you enjoy it it could be a rare treat. It would probably be better to get plain Greek style yoghurt though and add honey yourself if you feel you really need to, then phase out the sweetener. I bought the Yeo Valley Greek Style yogurt with honey by accident some time ago and it was SO sweet I couldn't eat it. The plain one is great on its own or with some berries.
    Well and happy - Journalling a primal life in London

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi pineneedles

      Thanks for the reply! I see what you mean! I dont mind it not being sweet at all! Just wanted to try something different.

      So would Mark not recommend plain greek yoghurt as a daily "snack" item?

      I am having it at the minute either as a breakfast or a mid morning snack with berries and nuts/seeds!

      Is greek better nutritionally than just natural yoghurt!

      Apologies for the questions! Still learning!

      Comment


      • #4
        I have a small container of greek yogurt daily and I consider that, with a small amount of cheese later in the day, moderation for me. Dairy is in the same tier as fruit, and most people consider 1-2 servings daily of fruit moderation. I really don't eat the fruit though (or nuts), so maybe that is my trade off.

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        • #5
          Yeah June! That makes sense!

          I dont drink much milk other wise! It would just be some cheese and yogurt! But I wouldn't eat cheese every day!

          Comment


          • #6
            I'm having greek yoghurt a few times a week (especially as the yeo valley one has been on special offer in Waitrose!) but do see it as one of my "treats" rather than one of my staples. As far as I understood Mark considers dairy part of the 20% rather than the 80%? But see what works for you. I can't see much wrong with yoghurt as it is high in saturated fat, reasonably high in protein and pro-biotic to boot. And delicious!

            Greek yoghurt is higher fat than normal so it's more satisfying. Other than that I'm not aware of nutritional benefits over any natural yoghurt. Organic dairy is meant to have a better Omega 6: Omega 3 ratio than non-organic.

            By the way, is Yoghurt / Yogurt a UK vs US spelling? I've never paid much attention to how I spell it but have noticed in nutrition databases you often have to search for "yogurt". (I live in the UK but English isn't my first language.)
            Well and happy - Journalling a primal life in London

            Comment


            • #7
              One more thing I noticed, it doesnt appear your yogurt is full fat, otherwise it would be around 20g of fat in a serving. Look for FAYE or CABOT full fat plain greek yogurt (10% fat). All dairy should be full fat to be primal.
              Primal since March 2011

              Female/29 years old/5' 1"/130ish lbs

              Comment


              • #8
                Is there added sugar in it? I believe labeling most yogurts as "probiotic" is misleading as the added sugar is bad for gut flora.
                Last edited by Bosnic; 11-03-2011, 05:44 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Looks like that's "greek style" yogurt, not just Greek yogurt which is what I typically see on a label....not sure what that means or if it makes a difference. Though the ingredient list falls into Mark's "primal gray area" -organic yogurt, organic cream, organic honey (10.2%)

                  The nutrition breakdown is less desirable (IMO) than what you would get with Greek Yogurt - less protein, less fat:
                  Your yogurt per 100g:
                  Protein 3.3g
                  Carbohydrate 12.6g
                  of which sugars 12.6g
                  Fat 7.2g
                  of which saturates 4.4g

                  Fage Total per 100g (no honey added):
                  Total fat 10g
                  Saturated fat 8g
                  Total carbohydrates 3g
                  Sugars* 3g
                  Protein 8g

                  I eat Fage Total Greek yogurt as a snack...either plain or mixed with some berries. Occasionally I add a touch of local raw, unpasteurized honey. You have to play around with things and see how you handle dairy - fermented and not. I removed dairy for 30 days and brought it back in...I found I can tolerate some dairy better than others and only at certain levels.
                  Heather and the hounds - Make a Fast Friend, Adopt a Greyhound!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Pineneedles View Post
                    I'm having greek yoghurt a few times a week (especially as the yeo valley one has been on special offer in Waitrose!) but do see it as one of my "treats" rather than one of my staples. As far as I understood Mark considers dairy part of the 20% rather than the 80%? But see what works for you. I can't see much wrong with yoghurt as it is high in saturated fat, reasonably high in protein and pro-biotic to boot. And delicious!

                    Greek yoghurt is higher fat than normal so it's more satisfying. Other than that I'm not aware of nutritional benefits over any natural yoghurt. Organic dairy is meant to have a better Omega 6: Omega 3 ratio than non-organic.

                    By the way, is Yoghurt / Yogurt a UK vs US spelling? I've never paid much attention to how I spell it but have noticed in nutrition databases you often have to search for "yogurt". (I live in the UK but English isn't my first language.)
                    Well, maybe I should try and just have it every other day for example! Generally I can tolerate dairy ok, but we'll see! Yeah i agree! Greek yoghurt is delicious!

                    Yip! Yoghurt is the UK spelling (i think)!

                    Originally posted by activia View Post
                    One more thing I noticed, it doesnt appear your yogurt is full fat, otherwise it would be around 20g of fat in a serving. Look for FAYE or CABOT full fat plain greek yogurt (10% fat). All dairy should be full fat to be primal.
                    Haven't heard of FAYE or CABOT before!

                    Originally posted by Bosnic View Post
                    Is there added sugar in it? I believe labeling most yogurts as "probiotic" is misleading as the added sugar is bad for gut flora.
                    mmm, not sure! From what I can see it doesnt say anywhere on the label that there is added sugar!

                    Originally posted by kennelmom View Post
                    Looks like that's "greek style" yogurt, not just Greek yogurt which is what I typically see on a label....not sure what that means or if it makes a difference. Though the ingredient list falls into Mark's "primal gray area" -organic yogurt, organic cream, organic honey (10.2%)

                    The nutrition breakdown is less desirable (IMO) than what you would get with Greek Yogurt - less protein, less fat:
                    Your yogurt per 100g:
                    Protein 3.3g
                    Carbohydrate 12.6g
                    of which sugars 12.6g
                    Fat 7.2g
                    of which saturates 4.4g

                    Fage Total per 100g (no honey added):
                    Total fat 10g
                    Saturated fat 8g
                    Total carbohydrates 3g
                    Sugars* 3g
                    Protein 8g

                    I eat Fage Total Greek yogurt as a snack...either plain or mixed with some berries. Occasionally I add a touch of local raw, unpasteurized honey. You have to play around with things and see how you handle dairy - fermented and not. I removed dairy for 30 days and brought it back in...I found I can tolerate some dairy better than others and only at certain levels.
                    Thanks for this excellent information!

                    I have just come from 8 months of following Slimming World (lost 3 stone) were fat was EVIL!! I am finding it difficult to adjust to the fact that its ok to eat good fat! But the more I read the more it makes sense. I have a degree in Physiology so all the science that Mark talks about makes sense to me.

                    My local Tesco only has the Total 0% FAGE! Will have another look as they advertise a full fat Tesco Finest on the website!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I eat M&S unsweetened probiotic greek style yoghurt - it's great stuff.
                      Nutrition, per 100g, is Protein 4.8g, Carbs 6.8g, Fat 10.1g of which 6.1g is saturated.

                      Total Fage full fat Greek Yoghurt would even better - will look for it the next I'm in Tesco.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I prefer not to eat full-fat dairy if the dairy is conventionally raised. When conventionally raised, I generally try to limit the amount of fat I consume - since a lot of the bad stuff gets stored in the fat. My grass-fed dairy however, is all full-fat. Just something to think about. Unless I know it is pastured/grass-fed, I get low-fat or fat free versions. Be careful though because the lower fat ones generally have higher carbs. Although from what I've heard, only half the carbs count in yogurt... but I don't have access to the source right now.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Step 1: Buy unsweetened, unflavored Greek yogurt.
                          Step 2: Buy organic, raw honey.
                          Step 3: Spoon honey into Greek yogurt.
                          Step 4: Mix
                          Step 5: Eat

                          That is how to make Primal Greek yogurt. Even if the ingredients on your yogurt are just milk, cultures and honey, I'd question the source of the honey. Processed honey is not Primal. You may as well just use brown sugar.
                          Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Always go to the manufacturer's website for specific nutritional info. Here are the actual ingredients of the OP's picture product:
                            organic yogurt, organic cream, organic honey (10.2%)

                            Typical Nutritional Composition per 100g:

                            Energy 523kJ/128kcal
                            Protein 3.3g
                            Carbohydrate 12.6g
                            of which sugars 12.6g
                            Fat 7.2g
                            of which saturates 4.4g
                            Fibre 0.0g
                            Sodium 0.04g

                            Honey - Rachel's Organic
                            carl's cave

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