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Gelatin/bone broths - from chicken?

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  • Gelatin/bone broths - from chicken?

    I've been wondering about this for a little while, and Mark's post today regarding gelatin finally spurred me to ask. I keep hearing how great bone broths are, but I haven't quite been able to fit red meat based bone broths into my diet.

    What I do have somewhat frequently (maybe 2x per week) is some type of dish with braised bone in chicken thighs. I know this produces gelatin because the liquid gels when chilled. I eat the chicken and the liquid.

    I know chicken is considered less optimal than red meat, but what I'm wondering is if this chicken preparation provides some of the benefits of bone broths (gelatin? minerals?) or if I should really work on getting in some of the red meat based variety...

  • #2
    Turkey would be a better bet than chicken, and it will be great. To make sure the thing sets, add some gelatin to the strained broth. If you want chicken jello'd broth, you might want to visit a local Asian store and buy some real chicken legs (like the yllow ones with talons). You can do the same with fish: make a strong fish broth from the heads and tails (sold separately) and then use the broth to set around the white fish like tilapia (again , use a bit of gelatin).
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    • #3
      chicken feet= best thick jello evvvveerrrrr
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      • #4
        WHenever I cook a whole chicken(once a week or so) I throw the carcas, skin and offals into a pot of water with some celery, carrots for flavor and cover in water. I then sit it in the oven over night covered at 170 . I freeze what I don't use immediately but I use it alot for frech drinking broth and cooking. It taste better with a chicken backbone, neck and liver and gizzards in the mix.
        Integrity is what we do when nobody's watching.

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        • #5
          When I buy chicken, I only ever buy whole birds, and usually make soup from it. Cut the bird up, simmer long enough to get the flesh off the bones. Reserve the flesh, put the bones back in for 3 hours or so, strain bones out, put in veggies, cook, put flesh back in 5 minutes before it's done. Season, eat.

          There are several beneficial aspects to these broths: gelatin comes from the bones, skin, and other connective tissue; minerals come from the bone, and glycosaminoglycans (which, along with gelatin, support good joint function), which come from the joints. So while simmering (or braising) bones is good, getting the joints is better, and is something where chicken actually shines compared to beef (cow knees are hard to find, and hard to handle).

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          • #6
            Plus chicken bone broth is the *best* tasting stuff, IMHO. My personal favourite.
            I have the simplest tastes. I am always satisfied with the best.

            Oscar Wilde

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            • #7
              If there aren't enough bones, throw them in a bag and freeze them When you have enough bones to half fill a slow cooker, add the juice of a lemon, cover with water and cook on low for about 12 / 24 hours - whatever fits with your schedule. The strained off stock should jell in the fridge - in which case you've got an ace stock!

              If you can get hold of them, a pigs foot or two, scalded and washed, is a BRILLIANT addition to chicken stock. Achieves a marvellous jell. Also, chickens feet are good to add too.
              Last edited by breadsauce; 11-01-2011, 04:50 AM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by primalphilly View Post
                I've been wondering about this for a little while, and Mark's post today regarding gelatin finally spurred me to ask. I keep hearing how great bone broths are, but I haven't quite been able to fit red meat based bone broths into my diet.

                What I do have somewhat frequently (maybe 2x per week) is some type of dish with braised bone in chicken thighs. I know this produces gelatin because the liquid gels when chilled. I eat the chicken and the liquid.

                I know chicken is considered less optimal than red meat, but what I'm wondering is if this chicken preparation provides some of the benefits of bone broths (gelatin? minerals?) or if I should really work on getting in some of the red meat based variety...
                If I read your question correctly, you are wondering if eating a chicken dish with bone in chicken thighs provides the same benefits as eating bone broth? No. Traditionally prepared bone broth will contain: calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sulfur, flouride, sodium, potassium, chondrotin sulfate, keratin sulfate, hyaluronic acid, collagen (gelatin), elastin, osteocytes and chondrocytes.
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                • #9
                  Thank you everyone for the replies and delicious sounding tips! Vanessa120, you did answer my question exactly, and it sounds like a chicken bone broth would be less optimal than a traditional bone broth, but from what AndreaReina says, chicken broth is not without benefits (and is delicious).

                  Do any of you ever do a braise with bone in beef for the same benefits? I'm interested in working this in, but not too keen on just having a bowl of bone broth alone. Right now I'm thinking about oxtails...

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