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Organic Valley Eggs - Response from inquiry about chicken feed

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  • Organic Valley Eggs - Response from inquiry about chicken feed

    I like Organic Valley dairy because it is pastured. However, the eggs don't sound as good. I emailed them about what the organic chicken feed is made of and this is the response. Thought I would share.

    Subject
    ---------------------------------------------------------------
    farming practices - chicken feed


    Discussion Thread
    ---------------------------------------------------------------
    Response (Tracy Budworth) - 10/20/2011 08:32 AM

    Dear Katie,

    Thank you for contacting Organic Valley and for the very kind words. Our farmers and employees truly appreciate your support.

    Organic Valley farmers are required to provide their animals with outdoor access and all animals receive 100% organic feed. Rations are composed mainly of soy beans, corn, flax seed, and small grains, such as wheat, barley and oats. The amounts may vary depending on the individual farmers management techniques.

    To learn more about our farm requirements you can log onto our Farmer web site, Farmers.coop - Organic Farmers, CROPP Cooperative.

    If I can be of further assistance, please do not hesitate to contact me.

    Sincerely,
    Tracy Budworth
    Organic Valley
    Consumer Relations - Social Media Specialist
    tracy.budworth@organicvalley.com
    608-625-2666 x3465
    LaFarge, WI 54639

  • #2
    Give her a call. "the amounts may vary depending on the individual farmers management techniques" is way too vague for me.

    Weak.

    Comment


    • #3
      Also "provide their animals with outdoor access" does not mean "their chicken go and stay outside during the day". Disappointing.

      Comment


      • #4
        I haven't found ANY grocery store eggs to compete with the pastured eggs I get. HOWEVER, my wife has a friend with some backyard chickens whose yokes are even more orange and firm. I love them. She has another friend with chickens whose yokes are pale though. I always go with the darker, firmer.

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        • #5
          ...chickens eat everything. why are they only feeding theirs grains?
          beautiful
          yeah you are

          Baby if you time travel back far enough you can avoid that work because the dust won't be there. You're too pretty to be working that hard.
          lol

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by bloodorchid View Post
            ...chickens eat everything. why are they only feeding theirs grains?
            Because, as someone noted above, "outdoor access" most definitely does not mean the chickens are prowling open fields eating bugs and whatever else like voracious little raptors. They just have nice ventilation and organic soy to eat!

            Comment


            • #7
              it was a rhetorical question
              beautiful
              yeah you are

              Baby if you time travel back far enough you can avoid that work because the dust won't be there. You're too pretty to be working that hard.
              lol

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              • #8
                Originally posted by bloodorchid View Post
                it was a rhetorical question
                LOL, I know, I just got caught up in the moment!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Most of the egg brands that are available to me in a grocery store have some variation on "proudly vegetarian fed chickens!" which annoys me a bit. Chickens should be out eating bugs and grubs and things.

                  So....farmer's market!
                  carl's cave

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    By their yolks ye shall know them. Should be as dark as possible with little irregularities like bubbly bits and flecks of blood/tissue.

                    When I had to find a new egg source, I bought a half dozen of each type I could find at the farmer's market. Then I put one of each in the skillet each time I made eggs. I quickly found the good brands based on the comparative color and the flavor of the yolk.

                    Now I buy the three best varieties each time to get a nice, broad nutritional profile.

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                    • #11
                      God, I wish pastured eggs weren't so expensive. I was eating them for about two weeks and now all other eggs look sad to me. We go through about 2 dozen eggs per week, so it would be significantly more expensive. It's fun to crack a pastured egg next to a cage-free egg and see the difference. And it's a HUGE difference.
                      http://baconandwhimsy.blogspot.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by glorth2 View Post
                        I haven't found ANY grocery store eggs to compete with the pastured eggs I get. HOWEVER, my wife has a friend with some backyard chickens whose yokes are even more orange and firm. I love them. She has another friend with chickens whose yokes are pale though. I always go with the darker, firmer.
                        My egg farmer recently switched from conventional feed to a custom made organic feed. Even though the hens are pastured, the new feed has made a huge improvement in color and flavor.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by MadelynMc View Post
                          God, I wish pastured eggs weren't so expensive. I was eating them for about two weeks and now all other eggs look sad to me. We go through about 2 dozen eggs per week, so it would be significantly more expensive. It's fun to crack a pastured egg next to a cage-free egg and see the difference. And it's a HUGE difference.
                          In the scope of your weekly food budget it is not a lot to switch to pastured eggs. I think you get the most bang or your buck on eggs. You're talking about $4-5 extra to significantly improve 1/3 of your meals!
                          Last edited by Adrianag; 10-20-2011, 05:49 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Adrianag View Post
                            In the scope of your weekly food budget it is not a lot to switch to pastured eggs. I think you get the most bang or your buck on eggs. You're talking about $4-5 extra tosignificantly improve 1/3 of your meals!
                            That is the truth. For example, chuck steak to filet mignon is a lot of money for not a lot of improvement (you just have to chew less). Go wth cheaper cuts of meat, sink the savings into pastured eggs, and profit!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Timothy View Post
                              That is the truth. For example, chuck steak to filet mignon is a lot of money for not a lot of improvement (you just have to chew less). Go wth cheaper cuts of meat, sink the savings into pastured eggs, and profit!
                              Gotta agree with this...Well worth the extra cost. ANd your chuck steak can become filet mignon, just slow cook it in the crok pot:-)
                              Free your mind, and your Grok will follow!

                              Comment

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