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  • Asian noodles

    Like many, I am playing with adding back in healthy carbs and want your opinions on Asian noodles. I have seen them made of rice flour, sweet potato starch, white potato starch, tapioca. No other processed ingredients.

    What's the consensus? Healthy starches? Benign starches? Refined and therefore to be avoided starches?

    Thanks in advance.

  • #2
    I put them somewhere in between "part of my 20%" and "good starch". Meaning that I don't feel bad having some a few times a month, but I'd never use them as a large portion of my carb intake.

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    • #3
      I found sweet potato ones and tried them. I like them well enough. Maybe once or twice a month as a carby treat, but certainly not a staple.

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      • #4
        If you're lean and healthy, I would say they're okay (preferably post-workout).

        That being said, they're still "refined," and made from the pulverized versions of whole food. I would still prefer whole potatoes and (less often) white rice over "potato starch" and "rice flour."

        Listen to your body, and stick with fresh, whole foods. Noodles have been processed to some degree, by machinery, as with white rice. Easy to overeat, but your body can process them.

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        • #5
          Thanks for weighing in you guys. I'm kind of on a Thai kick and things like fresh rolls are pretty fun. I will use as an indulgence rather than standard fare.

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          • #6
            So long as they are the benign starches, it doesn't really matter if they're refined. After all, the consensus seems to be that white rice (ie processed) is better than brown rice because of the removal of anti-nutrients

            By way OP, I only got your username the other day. Like it
            Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

            Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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