Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Type of bones for bone broth?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Type of bones for bone broth?

    I'm looking into making my own broth, but am wondering what bones I should be getting besides the ones from a chicken carcass? Also, is it best for the bones to come from a grass fed animal or would I still be getting the benefits from an organic animal's bones? Thanks in advance =)
    && It's not just about living well, it's about dying well.

  • #2
    I think even conventionally raised cows bones would be fine too. I would suggest getting bones with a fair amount of cartilage on them, because part of the "goodness" of bone broth is the amino profile you get from cooking down the jelly like substances. I personally make home made gelatin sometimes to get it instead of daily bone broth, but both are good.
    Karin

    A joyful heart is good medicine

    He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose. - Jim Elliot

    Mmmmm. Real food is good.

    My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread29685.html

    Comment


    • #3
      I like using beef neck bones. They're cheap, have a good bit of meat that is good to eat (take it off after a few hours then add the bones back in to simmer some more). I also like using oxtails, but they are more expensive.

      Comment


      • #4
        If you have a good butcher, ask for split calf heels (feet) and pigs trotters. They are FULL of gelatin which is very nutritious. Add them to any other bones you happen to be cooking. Roasting bones is good too - before dumping them in your slow cooker with water and lemon juice.

        Comment


        • #5
          Lamb/goat bones are good for newbies, they're smaller and break down faster.
          I'm a paleo foodie, come check out my recipes: http://strangekitty.ca/

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks everyone, I'll be going to get them today and it's nice to have a starting point! I haven't gotten to trying offal (not that brave yet), and because of this feel something is lacking so I thought I'd try making the broth to fill in some nutritive gaps.
            && It's not just about living well, it's about dying well.

            Comment


            • #7
              Does any one have a recipe for bone broth? How much bone should i add? How much water? Anything else i need to add? How long to i cook it for? I'd really love to make a bone broth but can't find an exact recipe anywhere ( Also when the broth is done, what do you add to it to turn it into a tasty soup?
              Thanks for any tips!

              Comment


              • #8
                put bones in pot add water to cover plus two inches. I add vegetables at the last few hours (celery carrots onions) strain. Make sure you salt to taste. Either drink or make it into a soup.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Jovana View Post
                  Does any one have a recipe for bone broth? How much bone should i add? How much water? Anything else i need to add? How long to i cook it for? I'd really love to make a bone broth but can't find an exact recipe anywhere ( Also when the broth is done, what do you add to it to turn it into a tasty soup?
                  Thanks for any tips!
                  There is no exact recipe, because it's not an exact science. But a general recipe would look like this (btw stock and broth are essentially the same thing, though some people will say broth is made with meat, stock with bones only):

                  Ingredients
                  • Bones (as much as you like, you're only limited by the size of your stockpot or by how much stock you want)
                  • Cold water (just enough to cover, usually tends to be about 1-2L/kg bones)
                  • Any vegetables, herbs or spices that you might fancy (I'd avoid starchy vegetables, as they will cloud the stock, and cruciferous vegetables, as they will produce a sulphurous taste


                  Procedure
                  1. (Optional) Wash or soak bones in cold water to remove blood, unless you don't mind the taste.
                  2a. For a white stock, blanch the bones by placing in cold water, heating until it boils for 2 minutes, then pour off the water and rinse. Return bones to stockpot and add cold water.
                  2b. For a brown stock, use leftover bones from a roast or brown raw bones in a hot oven. Return bones to stockpot and add cold water. Deglaze the roasting pan with a little boiling water and add this to the stockpot.
                  3. Heat stockpot, uncovered, until it reaches a simmer (a stock that reaches a boil will still taste good, but will look cloudy).
                  4. Skim the scum and particles that will form on the surface of the water, especially in the first hour of cooking.
                  5. Continue simmering, adding water as necessary to keep the bones submerged, until done. Done time depends on the simmer temperature, bone size (smaller is faster) and type of bones. Usually fish stocks will take half an hour, poultry stocks will take 1-4 hours, most red meats 4-8 hours, beef 6-12 hours. Breaking bones into smaller pieces, and chopping vegetables more finely, will speed the process (as will using a pressure cooker).
                  6. Add vegetables, herbs and spices in the last hour of cooking.
                  7. When done, allow to cool until no longer steaming. Strain the stock through cheesecloth, leaving as many solids as possible still in the pot.
                  8. Defat the stock:
                  a. by chilling in the fridge and removing the solid fat from the surface
                  b. by freezing the stock, then wrapping with cheesecloth and allow to thaw in the fridge. The stock will drip out of the cloth, the fat will remain.
                  c. by allowing to cool to room temperature, then spooning off the fat layer from the surface
                  9. (Optional) To further concentrate the stock, add to a clean stockpot and reduce in volume by up to half.
                  10. (Optional) To make a double stock, use the above-prepared stock in place of water for the next batch of bones.
                  11. To store, freeze (will keep for a month or two) or keep in fridge (for no more than 48 hours). Freeze in small portions, roughly what would be used in a single recipe.
                  Last edited by Doddibot; 09-26-2011, 04:28 AM.
                  "Thanks to the combination of meat, calcium-rich leaf foods, and a vigorous life, the early hunter-gatherers were robust, with strong skeletons, jaws, and teeth." - Harold McGee, On Food And Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by m e g a n foxy View Post
                    I'm looking into making my own broth, but am wondering what bones I should be getting besides the ones from a chicken carcass? Also, is it best for the bones to come from a grass fed animal or would I still be getting the benefits from an organic animal's bones? Thanks in advance =)
                    I use beef shank and knuckles. Shank have a lot of meat which I usually remove after the first 8 hours of cooking.
                    Currently dabbling in: IF, leangains, Starting Strength, 5/3/1

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I use beef and chicken bones, add an onion and a few carrots for extra flavor, and simmer about 8 hours. Usually, I'm too lazy to make soup and just drink it as is, but when I do I often use this recipe.

                      If you add a tsp of vinegar (I use apple cider) while it's simmering, it apparently helps extract minerals from the bones. When it's done cooking, I scoop the marrow out of the bones and mix into the broth for extra nutrients. For chicken bones I break off the ends and shove the marrow out with a chopstick.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I'm trying to track down where I read this, but I recently read somewhere that parsley also helps make some of the minerals in the bone broth more bioavailable. Maybe it's similar to vinegar?

                        The chicken broth recipe in the Primal cookbook is awesome. Just this weekend, this is what I did. It's super easy and not at all intimidating. Just make sure to check the cavity of the chicken for the neck and gizzards, sometimes they put that stuff in a little baggie, so you have to make sure and remove the packaging.

                        Put one whole chicken -- including neck, innards and feet if you have them; if you can get extra feet, clean them and throw those in too -- in a pot. Add three coarsely chopped carrots. Three coarsely chopped celery ribs. One coarsely chopped onion. (You can leave the skin on for more color if you want.) A handful of flat-leaf parsley. A few teaspoons of salt and some fresh pepper. Maybe a dash of vinegar. Fill the pot with water until it covers everything and bring to a boil. Cover, turn down the heat and simmer for an hour, skimming the scum off the top. Take the chicken out and let it cool. Cut the meat off and put the skin and bones back in the pot and top off the water. Cover and simmer for many hours, then let it cool, strain, skim the fat off the top with a spoon or paper towels, and enjoy!

                        And I just learned that you can also simmer the broth uncovered to condense the flavor.

                        Going to make the coconut milk lemongrass chicken soup from the Primal cookbook with the broth and chicken tonight.
                        ~elaine. twitter, primal journal.


                        Originally posted by vontrapp
                        CoWorker: What? Cmon live a little.
                        Me: No thanks, I'd rather live a lot.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          ooo yumm these all sound amazing! I can't wait to try it! I'm getting shanks (LOVE these), beef knuckles, and the roasted chicken bones. Maybe some lamb shanks as well. I can't wait to see if this makes a difference in how I feel/perform/look. anyone else experience positives from lots of broth and marrow? Also, does the marrow taste funky when you mix it with the broth?
                          && It's not just about living well, it's about dying well.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by m e g a n foxy View Post
                            ooo yumm these all sound amazing! I can't wait to try it! I'm getting shanks (LOVE these), beef knuckles, and the roasted chicken bones. Maybe some lamb shanks as well. I can't wait to see if this makes a difference in how I feel/perform/look. anyone else experience positives from lots of broth and marrow? Also, does the marrow taste funky when you mix it with the broth?
                            I don't find the marrow really has any detectable taste of its own, the only thing that might take some getting used to is the texture. The beef marrow is rather gelatinous kind of like pudding and the chicken is more dense. Neither of them mix in completely well and tend to rise to the top. You just have to get accustomed to little clumps of surprise in your broth. Perhaps a food processor might do a better job of mixing it in, but I've always just kind of mashed it in with a fork or spoon.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by m e g a n foxy View Post
                              anyone else experience positives from lots of broth and marrow? Also, does the marrow taste funky when you mix it with the broth?
                              I make my broth with just onions and a little vinegar, no salt. When I reheat, I add a little salt or miso to it to make a nice soup to go with my dinner, which I've been doing consistently for the past few weeks. Some things I noticed:

                              1) some chronically dry skin patches since going primal have gone away
                              2) get full and stay full up till bedtime
                              3) delicious

                              From the shank/knuckles, the marrow for me becomes this sort of fatty-like mass that has a buttery taste to it. More so when you add salt.
                              Currently dabbling in: IF, leangains, Starting Strength, 5/3/1

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X